• The AKARI All-Sky Catalogues are an important infrared astronomical database for next-generation astronomy that take over the IRAS catalog. We have developed an online service, AKARI Catalogue Archive Server (AKARI-CAS), for astronomers. The service includes useful and attractive search tools and visual tools. One of the new features of AKARI-CAS is cached SIMBAD/NED entries, which can match AKARI catalogs with other catalogs stored in SIMBAD or NED. To allow advanced queries to the databases, direct input of SQL is also supported. In those queries, fast dynamic cross-identification between registered catalogs is a remarkable feature. In addition, multiwavelength quick-look images are displayed in the visualization tools, which will increase the value of the service. In the construction of our service, we considered a wide variety of astronomers' requirements. As a result of our discussion, we concluded that supporting users' SQL submissions is the best solution for the requirements. Therefore, we implemented an RDBMS layer so that it covered important facilities including the whole processing of tables. We found that PostgreSQL is the best open-source RDBMS products for such purpose, and we wrote codes for both simple and advanced searches into the SQL stored functions. To implement such stored functions for fast radial search and cross-identification with minimum cost, we applied a simple technique that is not based on dividing celestial sphere such as HTM or HEALPix. In contrast, the Web application layer became compact, and was written in simple procedural PHP codes. In total, our system realizes cost-effective maintenance and enhancements.
  • AKARI, the first Japanese satellite dedicated to infrared astronomy, was launched on 2006 February 21, and started observations in May of the same year. AKARI has a 68.5 cm cooled telescope, together with two focal-plane instruments, which survey the sky in six wavelength bands from the mid- to far-infrared. The instruments also have the capability for imaging and spectroscopy in the wavelength range 2 - 180 micron in the pointed observation mode, occasionally inserted into the continuous survey operation. The in-orbit cryogen lifetime is expected to be one and a half years. The All-Sky Survey will cover more than 90 percent of the whole sky with higher spatial resolution and wider wavelength coverage than that of the previous IRAS all-sky survey. Point source catalogues of the All-Sky Survey will be released to the astronomical community. The pointed observations will be used for deep surveys of selected sky areas and systematic observations of important astronomical targets. These will become an additional future heritage of this mission.
  • The nearby face-on spiral galaxy M101 has been observed with the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) onboard AKARI. The far-infrared four-band images reveal fine spatial structures of M101, which include global spiral patterns, giant HII regions embedded in outer spiral arms, and a bar-like feature crossing the center. The spectral energy distribution of the whole galaxy shows the presence of the cold dust component (18 K) in addition to the warm dust component (55 K). The distribution of the cold dust is mostly concentrated near the center, and exhibits smoothly distributed over the entire extent of the galaxy, whereas the distribution of the warm dust indicates some correlation with the spiral arms, and has spotty structures such as four distinctive bright spots in the outer disk in addition to a bar-like feature near the center tracing the CO intensity map. The star-formation activity of the giant HII regions that spatially correspond to the former bright spots is found to be significantly higher than that of the rest of the galaxy. The latter warm dust distribution implies that there are significant star-formation activities in the entire bar filled with molecular clouds. Unlike our Galaxy, M101 is a peculiar normal galaxy with extraordinary active star-forming regions.
  • Far-infrared (IR) images of the nearby Sb galaxy NGC2841 and the Sc galaxy NGC2976 at wavelengths of 65, 90, 140, and 160 um have been obtained with the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) onboard AKARI. Both galaxies reveal similar morphologies of dust rings. They are, however, significantly different in the dust temperature: a cold (21 K) ring for NGC2841 and a warm (30 K) ring for NGC2976, which presumably reflects the difference in the origin of the ring structure for the different Hubble type of the galaxy. In addition to the dust ring structure, a warm dust component is detected from the central region of NGC2841, which may be attributed to the heating by its Low-Ionization Nuclear Emission-line Region nucleus. As for NGC2976, an extended dust component is observed along the minor axis, which shows a distribution somewhat asymmetrical to the galactic disk; this might be associated with the HI bridge in the M81/M82 group that NGC2976 belongs to. By taking advantage of a wealth of the far-IR bands of the FIS, it is demonstrated that the spectral energy distribution of NGC2841 is spatially more variable than that of NGC2976.