• Context: Clumping in the radiation-driven winds of hot, massive stars arises naturally due to the strong, intrinsic instability of line-driving (the `LDI'). But LDI wind models have so far mostly been limited to 1D, mainly because of severe computational challenges regarding calculation of the multi-dimensional radiation force. Aims: To simulate and examine the dynamics and multi-dimensional nature of wind structure resulting from the LDI. Methods: We introduce a `pseudo-planar', `box-in-a-wind' method that allows us to efficiently compute the line-force in the radial and lateral directions, and then use this approach to carry out 2D radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of the time-dependent wind. Results: Our 2D simulations show that the LDI first manifests itself by mimicking the typical shell-structure seen in 1D models, but how these shells then quickly break up into complex 2D density and velocity structures, characterized by small-scale density `clumps' embedded in larger regions of fast and rarefied gas. Key results of the simulations are that density-variations in the well-developed wind statistically are quite isotropic and that characteristic length-scales are small; a typical clump size is ~0.01R at 2R, thus resulting also in rather low typical clump-masses ~10^17 g. Overall, our results agree well with the theoretical expectation that the characteristic scale for LDI-generated wind-structure is of order the Sobolev length. We further confirm some earlier results that lateral `filling-in' of radially compressed gas leads to somewhat lower clumping factors in 2D simulations than in comparable 1D models. We conclude by discussing an extension of our method toward rotating LDI wind models that exhibit an intriguing combination of large- and small-scale structure extending down to the wind base.
  • OB stars exhibit various types of spectral variability historically associated with wind structures, including the apparently ubiquitous discrete absorption components (DACs). These features have been proposed to be caused either by magnetic fields or non-radial pulsations. In this second paper of this series, we revisit the canonical phenomenological hydrodynamical modelling used to explain the formation of DACs by taking into account modern observations and more realistic theoretical predictions. Using constraints on putative bright spots located on the surface of the O giant $\xi$ Persei derived from high precision space-based broadband optical photometry obtained with the Microvariability and Oscillations of STars (MOST) space telescope, we generate two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of co-rotating interaction regions in its wind. We then compute synthetic ultraviolet (UV) resonance line profiles using Sobolev Exact Integration and compare them with historical timeseries obtained by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) to evaluate if the observed behaviour of $\xi$ Persei's DACs is reproduced. Testing three different models of spot size and strength, we find that the classical pattern of variability can be successfully reproduced for two of them: the model with the smallest spots yields absorption features that are incompatible with observations. Furthermore, we test the effect of the radial dependence of ionization levels on line driving, but cannot conclusively assess the importance of this factor. In conclusion, this study self-consistently links optical photometry and UV spectroscopy, paving the way to a better understanding of cyclical wind variability in massive stars in the context of the bright spot paradigm.
  • Recent spectropolarimetric surveys of bright, hot stars have found that ~10% of OB-type stars contain strong (mostly dipolar) surface magnetic fields (~kG). The prominent paradigm describing the interaction between the stellar winds and the surface magnetic field is the magnetically confined wind shock (MCWS) model. In this model, the stellar wind plasma is forced to move along the closed field loops of the magnetic field, colliding at the magnetic equator, and creating a shock. As the shocked material cools radiatively it will emit X-rays. Therefore, X-ray spectroscopy is a key tool in detecting and characterizing the hot wind material confined by the magnetic fields of these stars. Some B-type stars are found to have very short rotational periods. The effects of the rapid rotation on the X-ray production within the magnetosphere have yet to be explored in detail. The added centrifugal force due to rapid rotation is predicted to cause faster wind outflows along the field lines, leading to higher shock temperatures and harder X-rays. However, this is not observed in all rapidly rotating magnetic B-type stars. In order to address this from a theoretical point of view, we use the X-ray Analytical Dynamical Magnetosphere (XADM) model, originally developed for slow rotators, with an implementation of new rapid rotational physics. Using X-ray spectroscopy from ESA's XMM-Newton space telescope, we observed 5 rapidly rotating B-type stars to add to the previous list of observations. Comparing the observed X-ray luminosity and hardness ratio to that predicted by the XADM allows us to determine the role the added centrifugal force plays in the magnetospheric X-ray emission of these stars.
  • The groundbreaking detection of gravitational waves produced by the inspiralling and coalescence of the black hole (BH) binary GW150914 confirms the existence of "heavy" stellar-mass BHs with masses >25 Msun. Initial modelling of the system by Abbott et al. (2016a) supposes that the formation of black holes with such large masses from the evolution of single massive stars is only feasible if the wind mass-loss rates of the progenitors were greatly reduced relative to the mass-loss rates of massive stars in the Galaxy, concluding that heavy BHs must form in low-metallicity (Z < 0.25-0.5 Zsun) environments. However, strong surface magnetic fields also provide a powerful mechanism for modifying mass loss and rotation of massive stars, independent of environmental metallicity (ud-Doula & Owocki 2002; ud-Doula et al. 2008). In this paper we explore the hypothesis that some heavy BHs, with masses >25 Msun such as those inferred to compose GW150914, could be the natural end-point of evolution of magnetic massive stars in a solar-metallicity environment. Using the MESA code, we developed a new grid of single, non-rotating, solar metallicity evolutionary models for initial ZAMS masses from 40-80 Msun that include, for the first time, the quenching of the mass loss due to a realistic dipolar surface magnetic field. The new models predict TAMS masses that are significantly greater than those from equivalent non-magnetic models, reducing the total mass lost by a strongly magnetized 80 Msun star during its main sequence evolution by 20 Msun. This corresponds approximately to the mass loss reduction expected from an environment with metallicity Z = 1/30 Zsun.
  • Many types of stars have strong magnetic fields that can dynamically influence the flow of circumstellar matter. In stars with accretion disks, the stellar magnetic field can truncate the inner disk and determine the paths that matter can take to flow onto the star. These paths are different in stars with different magnetospheres and periods of rotation. External field lines of the magnetosphere may inflate and produce favorable conditions for outflows from the disk-magnetosphere boundary. Outflows can be particularly strong in the propeller regime, wherein a star rotates more rapidly than the inner disk. Outflows may also form at the disk-magnetosphere boundary of slowly rotating stars, if the magnetosphere is compressed by the accreting matter. In isolated, strongly magnetized stars, the magnetic field can influence formation and/or propagation of stellar wind outflows. Winds from low-mass, solar-type stars may be either thermally or magnetically driven, while winds from massive, luminous O and B type stars are radiatively driven. In all of these cases, the magnetic field influences matter flow from the stars and determines many observational properties. In this chapter we review recent studies of accretion, outflows, and winds of magnetized stars with a focus on three main topics: (1) accretion onto magnetized stars; (2) outflows from the disk-magnetosphere boundary; and (3) winds from isolated massive magnetized stars. We show results obtained from global magnetohydrodynamic simulations and, in a number of cases compare global simulations with observations.
  • We observed NGC 1624-2, the O-type star with the largest known magnetic field Bp~20 kG), in X-rays with the ACIS-S camera onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Our two observations were obtained at the minimum and maximum of the periodic Halpha emission cycle, corresponding to the rotational phases where the magnetic field is the closest to equator-on and pole-on, respectively. With these observations, we aim to characterise the star's magnetosphere via the X-ray emission produced by magnetically confined wind shocks. Our main findings are: (i) The observed spectrum of NGC 1624-2 is hard, similar to the magnetic O-type star Theta 1 Ori C, with only a few photons detected below 0.8 keV. The emergent X-ray flux is 30% lower at the Halpha minimum phase. (ii) Our modelling indicated that this seemingly hard spectrum is in fact a consequence of relatively soft intrinsic emission, similar to other magnetic Of?p stars, combined with a large amount of local absorption (~1-3 x 10^22 cm^-2). This combination is necessary to reproduce both the prominent Mg and Si spectral features, and the lack of flux at low energies. NGC 1624-2 is intrinsically luminous in X-rays (log LX emission ~ 33.4) but 70-95% of the X-ray emission produced by magnetically confined wind shocks is absorbed before it escapes the magnetosphere (log LX ISM corrected ~ 32.5). (iii) The high X-ray luminosity, its variation with stellar rotation, and its large attenuation are all consistent with a large dynamical magnetosphere with magnetically confined wind shocks.
  • We present an overview of four phase-constrained Chandra HETGS X-ray observations of Delta Ori A. Delta Ori A is actually a triple system which includes the nearest massive eclipsing spectroscopic binary, Delta Ori Aa, the only such object which can be observed with little phase-smearing with the Chandra gratings. Since the fainter star, Delta Ori Aa2, has a much lower X-ray luminosity than the brighter primary, Delta Ori A provides a unique system with which to test the spatial distribution of the X-ray emitting gas around Delta Ori Aa1 via occultation by the photosphere of and wind cavity around the X-ray dark secondary. Here we discuss the X-ray spectrum and X-ray line profiles for the combined observation, having an exposure time of nearly 500 ksec and covering nearly the entire binary orbit. Companion papers discuss the X-ray variability seen in the Chandra spectra, present new space-based photometry and ground-based radial velocities simultaneous with the X-ray data to better constrain the system parameters, and model the effects of X-rays on the optical and UV spectrum. We find that the X-ray emission is dominated by embedded wind shock emission from star Aa1, with little contribution from the tertiary star Ab or the shocked gas produced by the collision of the wind of Aa1 against the surface of Aa2. We find a similar temperature distribution to previous X-ray spectrum analyses. We also show that the line half-widths are about $0.3-0.5\times$ the terminal velocity of the wind of star Aa1. We find a strong anti-correlation between line widths and the line excitation energy, which suggests that longer-wavelength, lower-temperature lines form farther out in the wind. Our analysis also indicates that the ratio of the intensities of the strong and weak lines of \ion{Fe}{17} and \ion{Ne}{10} are inconsistent with model predictions, which may be an effect of resonance scattering
  • The initial success of the Rigidly Rotating Magnetosphere (RRM) model application to the B2Vp star sigma OriE by Townsend, Owocki & Groote (2005) triggered a renewed era of observational monitoring of this archetypal object. We utilize high-resolution spectropolarimetry and the magnetic Doppler imaging (MDI) technique to simultaneously determine the magnetic configuration, which is predominately dipolar, with a polar strength Bd = 7.3-7.8 kG and a smaller non-axisymmetric quadrupolar contribution, as well as the surface distribution of abundance of He, Fe, C, and Si. We describe a revised RRM model that now accepts an arbitrary surface magnetic field configuration, with the field topology from the MDI models used as input. The resulting synthetic Ha emission and broadband photometric observations generally agree with observations, however, several features are poorly fit. To explore the possibility of a photospheric contribution to the observed photometric variability, the MDI abundance maps were used to compute a synthetic photospheric light curve to determine the effect of the surface inhomogeneities. Including the computed photospheric brightness modulation fails to improve the agreement between the observed and computed photometry. We conclude that the discrepancies cannot be explained as an effect of inhomogeneous surface abundance. Analysis of the UV light variability shows good agreement between observed variability and computed light curves, supporting the accuracy of the photospheric light variation calculation. We thus conclude that significant additional physics is necessary for the RRM model to acceptably reproduce observations of not only sigma Ori E, but also other similar stars with significant stellar wind-magnetic field interactions.
  • [Abridged] We develop and benchmark a fast and easy-to-use effective-opacity formalism for line and continuum radiative transfer in an accelerating two-component clumpy medium. The formalism bridges the limits of optically thin and thick clumps, and is here used to i) design a simple vorosity-modified Sobolev with exact integration (vmSEI) method for analyzing UV wind resonance lines in hot, massive stars, and ii) derive simple correction factors to the line force driving the outflows of such stars. We show that (for a given ionization factor) UV resonance doublets may be used to analytically predict the upward corrections in empirically inferred mass-loss rates associated with porosity in velocity space (a.k.a. velocity-porosity, or vorosity), but that severe solution degeneracies exist. For an inter-clump density set to 1 % of the mean density, we for O and B supergiants derive upward empirical mass-loss corrections of typically factors of either ~5 or ~50, depending on which of the two applicable solutions is chosen. Overall, our results indicate this solution dichotomy severely limits the use of UV resonance lines as direct mass-loss indicators of clumped hot stellar winds. We next apply the effective-opacity formalism to the standard CAK theory of line-driven winds. By analytic and numerical hydrodynamics calculations, we show that in cases where vorosity is important at the critical point setting the mass-loss rate, the reduced line-force leads to a lower theoretical mass loss, by a factor scaling with the normalized velocity filling factor fvel. On the other hand, if vorosity is important only above this critical point, the predicted mass loss is not affected, but the wind terminal speed is reduced. This shows that porosity in velocity space can have a significant impact not only on the diagnostics, but also on the dynamics and theory of radiatively driven winds.
  • Massive, hot OB-stars show clear evidence of strong macroscopic broadening (in addition to rotation) in their photospheric spectral lines. This paper examines the occurrence of such "macro-turbulence" in slowly rotating O-stars with strong, organised surface magnetic fields. Focusing on the CIV 5811A line, we find evidence for significant macro-turbulent broadening in all stars except NGC1624-2, which also has (by far) the strongest magnetic field. Instead, the very sharp CIV lines in NGC1624-2 are dominated by magnetic Zeeman broadening, from which we estimate a dipolar field of approximately 20 kG. By contrast, magnetic broadening is negligible in the other stars (due to their weaker field strengths, on order 1 kG), and their CIV profiles are typically very broad and similar to corresponding lines observed in non-magnetic O-stars. Quantifying this by an isotropic, Gaussian macro-turbulence, we derive vmac = 2.2 (+- 0.9/2.2) km/s for NGC1624-2, and vmac = 20-65 km/s for the rest of the magnetic sample. We use these observational results to test the hypothesis that the field can stabilise the atmosphere and suppress the generation of macro-turbulence down to stellar layers where the magnetic pressure PB and the gas pressure Pg are comparable. Using a simple grey atmosphere to estimate the temperature T0 at which PB = Pg, we find that T0 > Teff for all investigated magnetic stars, but that T0 reaches the ~160000 K layers associated with the iron opacity-bump in hot stars only for NGC1624-2. This is consistent with the view that the responsible physical mechanism for photospheric O-star macro-turbulence may be stellar gravity-mode oscillations excited by sub-surface convection zones, and suggests that a sufficiently strong magnetic field can suppress such iron-bump generated convection and associated pulsational excitation.
  • Building on results from the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) project, this paper shows how a two-parameter classification of massive-star magnetospheres in terms of the magnetic wind confinement (which sets the Alfv\'en radius RA) and stellar rotation (which sets the Kepler co-rotation radius RK) provides a useful organisation of both observational signatures and theoretical predictions. We compile the first comprehensive study of inferred and observed values for relevant stellar and magnetic parameters of 64 confirmed magnetic OB stars with Teff > 16 kK. Using these parameters, we locate the stars in the magnetic confinement-rotation diagram, a log-log plot of RK vs. RA. This diagram can be subdivided into regimes of centrifugal magnetospheres (CM), with RA > RK, vs. dynamical magnetospheres (DM), with RK > RA. We show how key observational diagnostics, like the presence and characteristics of Halpha emission, depend on a star's position within the diagram, as well as other parameters, especially the expected wind mass-loss rates. In particular, we identify two distinct populations of magnetic stars with Halpha emission: namely, slowly rotating O-type stars with narrow emission consistent with a DM, and more rapidly rotating B-type stars with broader emission associated with a CM. For O-type stars, the high mass-loss rates are sufficient to accumulate enough material for line emission even within the relatively short free-fall timescale associated with a DM: this high mass-loss rate also leads to a rapid magnetic spindown of the stellar rotation. For the B-type stars, the longer confinement of a CM is required to accumulate sufficient emitting material from their relatively weak winds, which also lead to much longer spindown timescales. [abbreviated]
  • It is observationally as well as theoretically well established that the winds of hot, massive OB-stars are highly structured on a broad range of spatial scales. This paper first discusses consequences of the small-scale structures associated with the strong instability inherent to the line-driving of these winds. We demonstrate the importance of a proper treatment of such wind clumping to obtain reliable estimates of mass-loss rates, and also show that instability simulations that are perturbed at the lower boundary indeed display significant clumping quite close to the wind base, in general agreement with observations. But a growing subset of massive stars has also been found to possess strong surface magnetic fields, which may channel the star's outflow and induce also large-scale wind structures and cyclic behavior of spectral diagnostics. The paper concludes by showing that multi-dimensional, magneto-hydrodynamical wind simulations, together with detailed radiative-transfer modeling, can reproduce remarkably well the periodic Balmer line emission observed in slowly rotating magnetic O stars like HD191612.
  • (shortened) It has been proposed that the envelopes of luminous stars may be subject to substantial radius inflation. The inflation effect has been discussed in relation to the radius problem of WR stars, but has yet failed to explain the large observed radii of Galactic WR stars. We wish to obtain a physical perspective of the inflation effect, and study the consequences for the radii of WR stars, and LBVs. For WR stars the observed radii are up to an order of magnitude larger than predicted by theory, whilst S Doradus-type LBVs are subject to humongous radius variations, which remain as yet ill-explained. We use a dual approach to investigate the envelope inflation, based on numerical models for stars near the Eddington limit, and a new analytic formalism to describe the effect. An additional new aspect is that we take the effect of density inhomogeneities (clumping) within the outer stellar envelopes into account. Due to the effect of clumping we are able to bring the observed WR radii in agreement with theory. Based on our new formalism, we find that the radial inflation is a function of a dimensionless parameter W, which largely depends on the topology of the Fe-opacity peak, i.e., on material properties. For W>1, we discover an instability limit, for which the stellar envelope becomes gravitationally unbound, i.e. there no longer exists a static solution. Within this framework we are also able to explain the S Doradus-type instabilities for LBVs like AG Car, with a possible triggering due to changes in stellar rotation. The stellar effective temperatures in the upper HR diagram are potentially strongly affected by the inflation effect. This may have particularly strong effects on the evolved massive LBV and WR stars just prior to their final collapse, as the progenitors of SNe Ibc, SNe II, and long GRBs.
  • Magnetic massive stars -- which are being discovered with increasing frequency -- represent a new category of wind-shaping mechanism for O and B stars. Magnetic channeling of these stars' radiation-driven winds, the Magnetically Confined Wind Shock paradigm, leads to the formation of a shock-heated magnetosphere, which can radiate X-rays, modify UV resonance lines, and create disks of Halpha emitting material. The dynamical properties of these magnetospheres are well understood from a theoretical point of view as an interplay between the magnetic wind confinement and rotation. However, the manifestations of magnetospheres across the spectrum may be more complex and various than first anticipated. On the other hand, recent advances in modeling these magnetospheres provide a key to better understand massive star winds in general. We will summarize the coordinated observational, theoretical, and modeling efforts from the Magnetism in Massive Star Project, addressing key outstanding questions regarding magnetosphere manifestations across the spectral domain.
  • Mass-loss rates currently in use for hot, massive stars have recently been seriously questioned, mainly because of the effects of wind clumping. We investigate the impact of clumping on diagnostic ultraviolet resonance and optical recombination lines. Optically thick clumps, a non-void interclump medium, and a non-monotonic velocity field are all accounted for in a single model. We used 2D and 3D stochastic and radiation-hydrodynamic (RH) wind models, constructed by assembling 1D snapshots in radially independent slices. To compute synthetic spectra, we developed and used detailed radiative transfer codes for both recombination lines (solving the "formal integral") and resonance lines (using a Monte-Carlo approach). In addition, we propose an analytic method to model these lines in clumpy winds, which does not rely on optically thin clumping. Results: Synthetic spectra calculated directly from current RH wind models of the line-driven instability are unable to in parallel reproduce strategic optical and ultraviolet lines for the Galactic O-supergiant LCep. Using our stochastic wind models, we obtain consistent fits essentially by increasing the clumping in the inner wind. A mass-loss rate is derived that is approximately two times lower than predicted by the line-driven wind theory, but much higher than the corresponding rate derived from spectra when assuming optically thin clumps. Our analytic formulation for line formation is used to demonstrate the potential impact of optically thick clumping in weak-winded stars and to confirm recent results that resonance doublets may be used as tracers of wind structure and optically thick clumping. (Abridged)
  • We examine the nature and role of mass loss via an equatorial decretion disk in massive stars with near-critical rotation induced by evolution of the stellar interior. In contrast to the usual stellar wind mass loss set by exterior driving from the stellar luminosity, such decretion-disk mass loss stems from the angular momentum loss needed to keep the star near and below critical rotation, given the interior evolution and decline in the star's moment of inertia. Because the specific angular momentum in a Keplerian disk increases with the square root of the radius, the decretion mass loss associated with a required level of angular momentum loss depends crucially on the outer radius for viscous coupling of the disk, and can be significantly less than the spherical mass loss the spherical, wind-like mass loss commonly assumed in evolutionary calculations. We discuss the physical processes that affect the outer disk radius, including thermal disk outflow, and ablation of the disk material via a line-driven wind induced by the star's radiation. We present parameterized scaling laws for taking account of decretion-disk mass loss in stellar evolution codes, including how these are affected by metallicity, or by presence within a close binary and/or a dense cluster. Effects similar to those discussed here should also be present in accretion disks during star formation, and may play an important role in shaping the distribution of rotation speeds on the ZAMS.
  • We present new U-band photometry of the magnetic Helium-strong star Sigma Ori E, obtained over 2004-2009 using the SMARTS 0.9-m telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. When combined with historical measurements, these data constrain the evolution of the star's 1.19 d rotation period over the past three decades. We are able to rule out a constant period at the p_null = 0.05% level, and instead find that the data are well described (p_null = 99.3%) by a period increasing linearly at a rate of 77 ms per year. This corresponds to a characteristic spin-down time of 1.34 Myr, in good agreement with theoretical predictions based on magnetohydrodynamical simulations of angular momentum loss from magnetic massive stars. We therefore conclude that the observations are consistent with Sigma Ori E undergoing rotational braking due to its magnetized line-driven wind.
  • In the subclass of high-mass X-ray binaries known as "microquasars", relativistic hadrons in the jets launched by the compact object can interact with cold protons from the star's radiatively driven wind, producing pions that then quickly decay into gamma rays. Since the resulting gamma-ray emissivity depends on the target density, the detection of rapid variability in microquasars with GLAST and the new generation of Cherenkov imaging arrays could be used to probe the clumped structure of the stellar wind. We show here that the fluctuation in gamma rays can be modeled using a "porosity length" formalism, usually applied to characterize clumping effects. In particular, for a porosity length defined by h=l/f, i.e. as the ratio of the characteristic size l of clumps to their volume filling factor f, we find that the relative fluctuation in gamma-ray emission in a binary with orbital separation a scales as sqrt(h/pi a) in the "thin-jet" limit, and is reduced by a factor 1/sqrt(1 + phi a/(2 l)) for a jet with a finite opening angle phi. For a thin jet and quite moderate porosity length h ~ 0.03 a, this implies a ca. 10 % variation in the gamma-ray emission. Moreover, the illumination of individual large clumps might result in isolated flares, as has been recently observed in some massive gamma-ray binaries.
  • We introduce a new Rigid-Field Hydrodynamics approach to modeling the magnetospheres of massive stars in the limit of very-strong magnetic fields. Treating the field lines as effectively rigid, we develop hydrodynamical equations describing the 1-dimensional flow along each, subject to pressure, radiative, gravitational, and centrifugal forces. We solve these equations numerically for a large ensemble of field lines, to build up a 3-dimensional time-dependent simulation of a model star with parameters similar to the archetypal Bp star sigma Ori E. Since the flow along each field line can be solved for independently of other field lines, the computational cost of this approach is a fraction of an equivalent magnetohydrodynamical treatment. The simulations confirm many of the predictions of previous analytical and numerical studies. Collisions between wind streams from opposing magnetic hemispheres lead to strong shock heating. The post-shock plasma cools initially via X-ray emission, and eventually accumulates into a warped, rigidly rotating disk defined by the locus of minima of the effective (gravitational plus centrifugal) potential. But a number of novel results also emerge. For field lines extending far from the star, the rapid area divergence enhances the radiative acceleration of the wind, resulting in high shock velocities (up to ~3,000 km/s) and hard X-rays. Moreover, the release of centrifugal potential energy continues to heat the wind plasma after the shocks, up to temperatures around twice those achieved at the shocks themselves. Finally, in some circumstances the cool plasma in the accumulating disk can oscillate about its equilibrium position, possibly due to radiative cooling instabilities in the adjacent post-shock regions.
  • Continuum driving is an effective method to drive a strong stellar wind. It is governed by two limits: the Eddington limit and the photon-tiring limit. A star must exceed the effective Eddington limit for continuum driving to overcome the stellar gravity. The photon-tiring limit places an upper limit on the mass loss rate that can be driven to infinity, given the energy available in the radiation field of the star. Since continuum driving does not require the presence of metals in the stellar atmosphere it is particularly suited to removing mass from low- and zero-metallicity stars and can play a crucial part in their evolution. Using a porosity length formalism we compute numerical simulations of super-Eddington, continuum driven winds to explore their behaviour for stars both below and above the photon-tiring limit. We find that below the photon tiring limit, continuum driving can produce a large, steady mass loss rate at velocities on the order of the escape velocity. If the star exceeds the photon-tiring limit, a steady solution is no longer possible. While the effective mass loss rate is still very large, the wind velocity is much smaller
  • LS I +61 303 is a puzzling Be/X-ray binary with variable gamma-ray emission at up TeV energies. The nature of the compact object and the origin of the high-energy emission are unclear. One family of models invokes particle acceleration in shocks from the collision between the B-star wind and a relativistic pulsar wind, while another centers on a relativistic jet powered by accretion. Recent high-resolution radio observations showing a putative "cometary tail" pointing away from the Be star near periastron have been cited as support for the pulsar-wind model. We wish here to carry out a quantitative assessment of these competing models for this extraordinary source. We apply a 3D SPH code for dynamical simulations of both the pulsar-wind-interaction and accretion-jet models. The former yields a description of the shape of the wind-wind interaction surface. The latter provides an estimation of the accretion rate. The results allow critical evaluation of how the two distinct models confront the data in various wavebands under a range of conditions. When one accounts for the 3D dynamical wind interaction under realistic constraints for the relative strength of the B-star and pulsar winds, the resulting form of the interaction front does not match the putative "cometary tail" claimed from radio observations. On the other hand, dynamical simulations of the accretion-jet model indicate that the orbital phase variation of accretion power includes a secondary broad peak well away from periastron, thus providing a plausible way to explain the observed TeV gamma ray emission toward apastron. We conclude that the colliding-wind model is not clearly established for LS I +61 303, while the accretion-jet model can reproduce many key characteristics of the observed TeV gamma-ray emission.
  • Gamma-rays can be produced by the interaction of a relativistic jet and the matter of the stellar wind in the subclass of massive X-ray binaries known as "microquasars". The relativistic jet is ejected from the surroundings of the compact object and interacts with cold protons from the stellar wind, producing pions that then quickly decay into gamma-rays. Since the resulting gamma-ray emissivity depends on the target density, the detection of rapid variability in microquasars with GLAST and the new generation of Cherenkov imaging arrays could be used to probe the clumped structure of the stellar wind. In particular, we show here that the relative fluctuation in gamma rays may scale with the square root of the ratio of porosity length to binary separation, \sqrt{h/a}, implying for example a ca. 10 % variation in gamma ray emission for a quite moderate porosity, h/a ~ 0.01.
  • We present XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer observations of pairs of X-ray emission line profiles from the O star Zeta Pup that originate from the same He-like ion. The two profiles in each pair have different shapes and cannot both be consistently fit by models assuming the same wind parameters. We show that the differences in profile shape can be accounted for in a model including the effects of resonance scattering, which affects the resonance line in the pair but not the intercombination line. This implies that resonance scattering is also important in single resonance lines, where its effect is difficult to distinguish from a low effective continuum optical depth in the wind. Thus, resonance scattering may help reconcile X-ray line profile shapes with literature mass-loss rates.
  • We present 2D MHD simulations of the radiatively driven outflow from a rotating hot star with a dipole magnetic field aligned with the star's rotation axis. We focus primarily on a model with moderately rapid rotation (half the critical value), and also a large magnetic confinement parameter, $\eta_{\ast} \equiv B_{\ast}^2 R_{\ast}^{2} / \dot{M} V_{\infty} = 600$. The magnetic field channels and torques the wind outflow into an equatorial, rigidly rotating disk extending from near the Kepler corotation radius outwards. Even with fine-tuning at lower magnetic confinement, none of the MHD models produce a stable Keplerian disk. Instead, material below the Kepler radius falls back on to the stellar surface, while the strong centrifugal force on material beyond the corotation escape radius stretches the magnetic loops outwards, leading to episodic breakout of mass when the field reconnects. The associated dissipation of magnetic energy heats material to temperatures of nearly $10^{8}$K, high enough to emit hard (several keV) X-rays. Such \emph{centrifugal mass ejection} represents a novel mechanism for driving magnetic reconnection, and seems a very promising basis for modeling X-ray flares recently observed in rotating magnetic Bp stars like $\sigma$ Ori E.
  • We attempt to characterize the observed variability of the magnetic helium-strong star sigma Ori E in terms of a recently developed rigidly rotating magnetosphere model. This model predicts the accumulation of circumstellar plasma in two co-rotating clouds, situated in magnetohydrostatic equilibrium at the intersection between magnetic and rotational equators. We find that the model can reproduce well the periodic modulations observed in the star's light curve, H alpha emission-line profile, and longitudinal field strength, confirming that it furnishes an essentially correct, quantitative description of the star's magnetically controlled circumstellar environment.