• We investigate the higher-order correlation properties of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) to test the hierarchical scaling hypothesis at z~1 and the dependence on galaxy luminosity, stellar mass, and redshift. We also aim to assess deviations from the linearity of galaxy bias independently from a previously performed analysis of our survey (Di Porto et al. 2014). We have measured the count probability distribution function in cells of radii 3 < R < 10 Mpc/h, deriving $\sigma_{8g}$, the volume-averaged two-,three-,and four-point correlation functions and the normalized skewness $S_{3g}$ and kurtosis $S_{4g}$ for volume-limited subsamples covering the ranges $-19.5 \le M_B(z=1.1)-5log(h) \le -21.0$, $9.0 < log(M*/M_{\odot} h^{-2}) \le 11.0$, $0.5 \le z < 1.1$. We have thus performed the first measurement of high-order correlations at z~1 in a spectroscopic redshift survey. Our main results are the following. 1) The hierarchical scaling holds throughout the whole range of scale and z. 2) We do not find a significant dependence of $S_{3g}$ on luminosity (below z=0.9 $S_{3g}$ decreases with luminosity but only at 1{\sigma}-level). 3) We do not detect a significant dependence of $S_{3g}$ and $S_{4g}$ on scale, except beyond z~0.9, where the dependence can be explained as a consequence of sample variance. 4) We do not detect an evolution of $S_{3g}$ and $S_{4g}$ with z. 5) The linear bias factor $b=\sigma_{8g}/\sigma_{8m}$ increases with z, in agreement with previous results. 6) We quantify deviations from the linear bias by means of the Taylor expansion parameter $b_2$. Our results are compatible with a null non-linear bias term, but taking into account other available data we argue that there is evidence for a small non-linear bias term.
  • We compare three methods to measure the count-in-cell probability density function of galaxies in a spectroscopic redshift survey. From this comparison we found that when the sampling is low (the average number of object per cell is around unity) it is necessary to use a parametric method to model the galaxy distribution. We used a set of mock catalogues of VIPERS, in order to verify if we were able to reconstruct the cell-count probability distribution once the observational strategy is applied. We find that in the simulated catalogues, the probability distribution of galaxies is better represented by a Gamma expansion than a Skewed Log-Normal. Finally, we correct the cell-count probability distribution function from the angular selection effect of the VIMOS instrument and study the redshift and absolute magnitude dependency of the underlying galaxy density function in VIPERS from redshift $0.5$ to $1.1$. We found very weak evolution of the probability density distribution function and that it is well approximated, independently from the chosen tracers, by a Gamma distribution.
  • We explore the evolution of the Colour-Magnitude Relation (CMR) and Luminosity Function (LF) at 0.4<z<1.3 from the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) using ~45,000 galaxies with precise spectroscopic redshifts down to i'_AB<22.5 over ~10.32 deg^2 in two fields. From z=0.5 to z=1.3 the LF and CMR are well defined for different galaxy populations and M^*_B evolves by ~1.04(1.09)+/-0.06(0.10) mag for the total (red) galaxy sample. We compare different criteria for selecting early-type galaxies (ETGs): (1) fixed cut in rest-frame (U-V) colours, (2) evolving cut in (U-V) colours, (3) rest-frame (NUV-r')-(r'-K) colour selection, and (4) SED classification. Regardless of the method we measure a consistent evolution of the red-sequence (RS). Between 0.4<z<1.3 we find a moderate evolution of the RS intercept of Delta(U-V)=0.28+/-0.14 mag, favouring exponentially declining star formation (SF) histories with SF truncation at 1.7<=z<=2.3. Together with the rise in the ETG number density by 0.64 dex since z=1, this suggests a rapid build-up of massive galaxies (M>10^11 M_sun) and expeditious RS formation over a short period of ~1.5 Gyr starting before z=1. This is supported by the detection of ongoing SF in ETGs at 0.9<z<1.0, in contrast with the quiescent red stellar populations of ETGs at 0.5<z<0.6. There is an increase in the observed CMR scatter with redshift, two times larger than in galaxy clusters and at variance with theoretical models. We discuss possible physical mechanisms that support the observed evolution of the red galaxy population. Our findings point out that massive galaxies have experienced a sharp SF quenching at z~1 with only limited additional merging. In contrast, less-massive galaxies experience a mix of SF truncation and minor mergers which build-up the low- and intermediate-mass end of the CMR.
  • We present the first Public Data Release (PDR-1) of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Survey (VIPERS). It comprises 57 204 spectroscopic measurements together with all additional information necessary for optimal scientific exploitation of the data, in particular the associated photometric measurements and quantification of the photometric and survey completeness. VIPERS is an ESO Large Programme designed to build a spectroscopic sample of ' 100 000 galaxies with iAB < 22.5 and 0.5 < z < 1.5 with high sampling rate (~45%). The survey spectroscopic targets are selected from the CFHTLS-Wide five-band catalogues in the W1 and W4 fields. The final survey will cover a total area of nearly 24 deg2, for a total comoving volume between z = 0.5 and 1.2 of ~4x10^7 h^(-3)Mpc^3 and a median galaxy redshift of z~0.8. The release presented in this paper includes data from virtually the entire W4 field and nearly half of the W1 area, thus representing 64% of the final dataset. We provide a detailed description of sample selection, observations and data reduction procedures; we summarise the global properties of the spectroscopic catalogue and explain the associated data products and their use, and provide all the details for accessing the data through the survey database (http://vipers.inaf.it) where all information can be queried interactively.
  • We measure the evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function from z=1.3 to z=0.5 using the first 53,608 redshifts of the ongoing VIMOS Public Extragalactic Survey (VIPERS). We estimate the galaxy stellar mass function at several epochs discussing in detail the amount of cosmic variance affecting our estimate. We find that Poisson noise and cosmic variance of the galaxy mass function in the VIPERS survey are comparable with the statistical uncertainties of large surveys in the local universe. VIPERS data allow us to determine with unprecedented accuracy the high-mass tail of the galaxy stellar mass function, which includes a significant number of galaxies that are usually too rare to detect with any of the past spectroscopic surveys. At the epochs sampled by VIPERS, massive galaxies had already assembled most of their stellar mass. We apply a photometric classification in the (U-V) rest-frame colour to compute the mass function of blue and red galaxies, finding evidence for the evolution of their contribution to the total number density budget: the transition mass above which red galaxies dominate is found to be about 10^10.4 M_sun at z=0.55 and evolves proportionally to (1+z)^3. We are able to trace separately the evolution of the number density of blue and red galaxies with masses above 10^11.4 M_sun, in a mass range barely studied in previous work. We find that for such large masses, red galaxies show a milder evolution with redshift, when compared to objects at lower masses. At the same time, we detect a population of similarly massive blue galaxies, which are no longer detectable below z=0.7. These results show the improved statistical power of VIPERS data, and give initial promising indications of mass-dependent quenching of galaxies at z~1. [Abridged]
  • The aim of this work is to develop a comprehensive method for classifying sources in large sky surveys and we apply the techniques to the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Using the optical (u*, g', r', i') and NIR data (z', Ks), we develop a classifier, based on broad-band photometry, for identifying stars, AGNs and galaxies improving the purity of the VIPERS sample. Support Vector Machine (SVM) supervised learning algorithms allow the automatic classification of objects into two or more classes based on a multidimensional parameter space. In this work, we tailored the SVM for classifying stars, AGNs and galaxies, and applied this classification to the VIPERS data. We train the SVM using spectroscopically confirmed sources from the VIPERS and VVDS surveys. We tested two SVM classifiers and concluded that including NIR data can significantly improve the efficiency of the classifier. The self-check of the best optical + NIR classifier has shown a 97% accuracy in the classification of galaxies, 97 for stars, and 95 for AGNs in the 5-dimensional colour space. In the test on VIPERS sources with 99% redshift confidence, the classifier gives an accuracy equal to 94% for galaxies, 93% for stars, and 82% for AGNs. The method was applied to sources with low quality spectra to verify their classification, and thus increasing the security of measurements for almost 4 900 objects. We conclude that the SVM algorithm trained on a carefully selected sample of galaxies, AGNs, and stars outperforms simple colour-colour selection methods, and can be regarded as a very efficient classification method particularly suitable for modern large surveys.
  • We investigate the dependence of galaxy clustering on luminosity and stellar mass in the redshift range 0.5<z<1.1, using the first ~55000 redshifts from the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). We measured the redshift-space two-point correlation functions (2PCF), and the projected correlation function, in samples covering different ranges of B-band absolute magnitudes and stellar masses. We considered both threshold and binned galaxy samples, with median B-band absolute magnitudes -21.6<MB-5log(h)<-19.5 and median stellar masses 9.8<log(M*[Msun/h^2])<10.7. We assessed the real-space clustering in the data from the projected correlation function, which we model as a power law in the range 0.2<r_p[Mpc/h]<20. Finally, we estimated the galaxy bias as a function of luminosity, stellar mass, and redshift, assuming a flat LCDM model to derive the dark matter 2PCF. We provide the best-fit parameters of the power-law model assumed for the real-space 2PCF -- the correlation length and the slope -- as well as the linear bias parameter, as a function of the B-band absolute magnitude, stellar mass, and redshift. We confirm and provide the tightest constraints on the dependence of clustering on luminosity at 0.5<z<1.1. We prove the complexity of comparing the clustering dependence on stellar mass from samples that are originally flux-limited and discuss the possible origin of the observed discrepancies. Overall, our measurements provide stronger constraints on galaxy formation models, which are now required to match, in addition to local observations, the clustering evolution measured by VIPERS galaxies between z=0.5 and z=1.1 for a broad range of luminosities and stellar masses.
  • We present in this paper the general real- and redshift-space clustering properties of galaxies as measured in the first data release of the VIPERS survey. VIPERS is a large redshift survey designed to probe the distant Universe and its large-scale structure at 0.5 < z < 1.2. We describe in this analysis the global properties of the sample and discuss the survey completeness and associated corrections. This sample allows us to measure the galaxy clustering with an unprecedented accuracy at these redshifts. From the redshift-space distortions observed in the galaxy clustering pattern we provide a first measurement of the growth rate of structure at z = 0.8: f\sigma_8 = 0.47 +/- 0.08. This is completely consistent with the predictions of standard cosmological models based on Einstein gravity, although this measurement alone does not discriminate between different gravity models.
  • The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) is an ongoing ESO Large Programme to map in detail the large-scale distribution of galaxies at 0.5 < z <1.2. With a combination of volume and sampling density that is unique for these redshifts, it focuses on measuring galaxy clustering and related cosmological quantities as part of the grand challenge of understanding the origin of cosmic acceleration. VIPERS has also been designed to guarantee a broader legacy, allowing detailed investigations of the properties and evolutionary trends of z~1 galaxies. The survey strategy exploits the specific advantages of the VIMOS spectrograph at the VLT, aiming at a final sample of nearly 100,000 galaxy redshifts to iAB = 22.5 mag, which represents the largest redshift survey ever performed with ESO telescopes. In this introductory article we describe the survey construction, together with early results based on a first sample of ~55,000 galaxies.
  • We describe the construction and general features of VIPERS, the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey. This `Large Programme' has been using the ESO VLT with the aim of building a spectroscopic sample of ~100,000 galaxies with i_{AB}<22.5 and 0.5<z<1.5. The survey covers a total area of ~24 deg^2 within the CFHTLS-Wide W1 and W4 fields. VIPERS is designed to address a broad range of problems in large-scale structure and galaxy evolution, thanks to a unique combination of volume (~ 5 x 10^7 h^{-3} Mpc^3) and sampling rate (~ 40%), comparable to state-of-the-art surveys of the local Universe, together with extensive multi-band optical and near-infrared photometry. Here we present the survey design, the selection of the source catalogue and the development of the spectroscopic observations. We discuss in detail the overall selection function that results from the combination of the different constituents of the project. This includes the masks arising from the parent photometric sample and the spectroscopic instrumental footprint, together with the weights needed to account for the sampling and the success rates of the observations. Using the catalogue of 53,608 galaxy redshifts composing the forthcoming VIPERS Public Data Release 1 (PDR-1), we provide a first assessment of the quality of the spectroscopic data. Benefiting from the combination of size and detailed sampling of this dataset, we conclude by presenting a map showing in unprecedented detail the large-scale distribution of galaxies between 5 and 8 billion years ago. [abridged]
  • We develop a Principal Component Analysis aimed at classifying a sub-set of 27,350 spectra of galaxies in the range 0.4 < z < 1.0 collected by the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). We apply an iterative algorithm to simultaneously repair parts of spectra affected by noise and/or sky residuals, and reconstruct gaps due to rest-frame transformation, and obtain a set of orthogonal spectral templates that span the diversity of galaxy types. By taking the three most significant components, we find that we can describe the whole sample without contamination from noise. We produce a catalogue of eigen-coefficients and template spectra that will be part of future VIPERS data releases. Our templates effectively condense the spectral information into two coefficients that can be related to the age and star formation rate of the galaxies. We examine the spectrophotometric types in this space and identify early, intermediate, late and starburst galaxies.
  • The Pan-STARRS1 survey is obtaining multi-epoch imaging in 5 bands (gps rps ips zps yps) over the entire sky North of declination -30deg. We describe here the implementation of the Photometric Classification Server (PCS) for Pan-STARRS1. PCS will allow the automatic classification of objects into star/galaxy/quasar classes based on colors, the measurement of photometric redshifts for extragalactic objects, and constrain stellar parameters for stellar objects, working at the catalog level. We present tests of the system based on high signal-to-noise photometry derived from the Medium Deep Fields of Pan-STARRS1, using available spectroscopic surveys as training and/or verification sets. We show that the Pan-STARRS1 photometry delivers classifications and photometric redshifts as good as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry to the same magnitude limits. In particular, our preliminary results, based on this relatively limited dataset down to the SDSS spectroscopic limits and therefore potentially improvable, show that stars are correctly classified as such in 85% of cases, galaxies in 97% and QSOs in 84%. False positives are less than 1% for galaxies, ~19% for stars and ~28% QSOs. Moreover, photometric redshifts for 1000 luminous red galaxies up to redshift 0.5 are determined to 2.4% precision with just 0.4% catastrophic outliers and small (-0.5%) residual bias. PCS will create a value added catalog with classifications and photometric redshifts for eventually many millions sources.
  • We present the power spectrum of galaxy clusters measured from the new ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-Ray (REFLEX II) galaxy cluster catalogue. This new sample extends the flux limit of the original REFLEX to $1.8 \times 10^{-12} erg/ s/cm^{2}$, yielding a total of 911 clusters with $\geq 94$ per cent completeness in redshift follow-up. The analysis of the data is improved by creating a set of 100 REFLEX II-like mock galaxy cluster catalogues built from a suite of large volume LCDM N-body simulations (L-BASICC II). The measured power spectrum is in agreement with the predictions from a LCDM cosmological model. The measurements show the expected increase in the amplitude of the power spectrum with increasing X-ray luminosity. On large scales, we show that the shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a scale independent bias and provide a model for the amplitude that allows us to connect our measurements with a cosmological model. By implementing a luminosity-dependent power spectrum estimator, we observe that the power spectrum measured from the REFLEX II sample is weakly affected by flux-selection effects. The shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a featureless power spectrum on scales $k>0.01\,h/Mpc$ and hence no statistically significant signal of baryonic acoustic oscillations can be detected. We show that the measured REFLEX II power spectrum displays signatures of non-linear evolution.
  • We have developed a method to calculate overdensities in multicolour surveys, facilitating a direct comparison of the local density contrast measured using galaxy samples that have different redshift error distributions, i.e. for red and blue, or bright and faint galaxies, respectively. We calculate overdensities in small redshift slices (Delta z =0.02, which at z=0.3 corresponds roughly to Delta r_comoving=53 h^-1 Mpc) for 9176 galaxies with R<=23.65, M_B(Vega)-5log h<=-18, and z<= 0.7, in three COMBO-17 fields (measuring 31'X 31' each). The mean redshift errors of this sample are approximately sigma_z/(1+z)~0.015. In the Chandra Deep Field South we identify a region that is underdense by almost a factor 2 compared to the other two fields in the same redshift range (0.25<~ z <~0.4). This can be used for an investigation of the variation of the colour-dependent luminosity function with environment: We calculate the luminosity function in this redshift range for red sequence and blue cloud galaxies (as defined by Bell et al. 04) in each of the fields separately. While the luminosity function of the blue galaxies remains unaffected by different density contrasts, the luminosity function of the red galaxies clearly has a more positive faint-end slope in the Chandra Deep Field South as compared to the other two COMBO-17 fields. The underdensity there is thus mainly due to a deficiency of faint red galaxies. This result is in qualitative agreement with the trends seen at z=0.1, e.g. in the 2dFGRS (Croton et al. 05), or in the SDSS (Zandivarez et al. 06).
  • We have developed a method to calculate overdensities in multicolour surveys, and compare the local density contrast measured in galaxy samples with different redshift error distributions. We calculated overdensities for three COMBO-17 fields, and identified a region in the CDFS, where the density is lower by a factor of 2 compared to the other two fields. This is mainly due to a deficiency of faint red galaxies. This result is in agreement with local observations in the 2dF.
  • We reanalyze deep star counts in five CADIS fields. The data are presented as vertical density distributions of stars perpendicular to the Galactic plane. In three fields the profiles are consistent with each other, while in two fields significant overdensities of stars are found. The overdensity in one field can be associated with the Virgo overdensity which can be traced right into the disk of the Milky Way. Using this detection we estimate the mass of the Virgo overdensity and show that this is equivalent to the stellar content of a Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The overdensity in the second field is more difficult to associate with a previously known overdensity. We suggest that it is related both to the Monoceros stream and the recently discovered Orphan stream.
  • We present measurements of galaxy clustering at redshift <z>=0.6 using 10360 galaxies with photometric redshifts over an area of 0.78 square degree from the COMBO-17 survey. To obtain a result that is unaffected by redshift uncertainties, we calculate the projected correlation function w(r_p), giving results for red sequence and blue cloud galaxies separately. The correlation function of the red galaxies displays clear deviations from a power law at comoving separations around 1 to 3 h^-1 Mpc, and similar but weaker trends are suggested by the data for the blue galaxies. To interpret these results, we fit the correlation functions with analytical predictions derived from a simple halo occupation model. This combines linear clustering of the underlying mass with a description of the number of galaxies occupying each dark-matter halo (the halo occupation distribution). If the occupation numbers are taken to be a simple power law with N proportional to M^alpha, then alpha ~ 0.5 and alpha ~ 0.2 for red and blue galaxies respectively. These figures are little different from the values required to fit present-day clustering data. The power-spectrum shape is assumed to be known in this exercise, but we allow the data to determine the preferred value of sigma_8, the linear power-spectrum normalization. The average normalization inferred from red and blue galaxies at <z> =0.6 is sigma_8=1.02+-0.17 at zero redshift, consistent with independent estimates of this local value. This agreement can be regarded as a verification of the hierarchical growth of the halo mass function.
  • We used 1627 faint (15.5< R<23) stars in five fields of the Calar Alto Deep Imaging Survey (CADIS) to estimate the structure parameters of the Galaxy. The results were derived by applying two complementary methods: first by fitting the density distribution function to the measured density of stars perpendicular to the Galactic plane, and second by modelling the observed colors and apparent magnitudes of the stars in the field, using Monte Carlo simulations. The best-fitting model of the Galaxy is then determined by minimising the C-statistic, a modified chisquared. Our model includes a double exponential for the stellar disk with scaleheights h_1 and h_2 and a power law halo with exponent alpha. 24480 different parameter combinations have been simulated. Both methods yield consistent results: the best fitting parameter combination is alpha=3.0 (or alpha=2.5, if we allow for a flattening of the halo with an axial ratio of (c/a)=0.6), h_1=300 pc, h_2=900 pc, and the contribution of thick disk stars to the disk stars in the solar neighbourhood is found to be between 4 and 10%.
  • We present results from an investigation of the clustering evolution of field galaxies between a redshift of z~1 and the present epoch. The current analysis relies on a sample of ~3600 galaxies from the Calar Alto Deep Imaging Survey (CADIS). The redshift distribution extends to z~1.1, with formal errors of sigma_z~0.02. Thus the amplitude of the three-dimensional correlation function can be estimated by means of the projected correlation function w(r_p). We developed a new method to overcome the influence of redshift errors on w(r_p). We parametrise the evolution of the clustering strength with redshift by a parameter q, the values of which give directly the deviation of the evolution from the global Hubble flow. From a subsample of bright galaxies we find q=-2.28+-0.31 for Omega_m=0.3, Omega_Lambda=0.7, that is a significant growth of the clustering strength between z=1 and the present epoch. From linear theory of dark matter clustering growth one would only expect q=-2. Moreover, we establish that the measured clustering strength depends on galaxy type: galaxies with early type SEDs (Hubble type: E0 to Sbc) are more strongly clustered at redshifts z>0.2 than later types. The evolution of the amplitude of the two-point correlation function for these ``old'' galaxies is much slower (q=-0.85+-0.82 for Omega_m=0.3, Omega_Lambda=0.7).
  • We present results of an investigation of clustering evolution of field galaxies between a redshift of z\~1 and the present epoch. The current analysis relies on a sample of ~14000 galaxies in two fields of the COMBO-17 survey. The redshift distribution extends to z~1.1. The amplitude of the three-dimensional correlation function can be estimated by means of the projected correlation function w(r_p). The validity of the deprojection was tested on the Las Campanas Redshift Survey (LCRS). In a flat cosmology with non-zero cosmological constant for bright galaxies (M_B<-18) the clustering growth is proportional to (1+z)^{-2}. However, the measured clustering evolution clearly depends on Hubble type. While locally the clustering strength of early type galaxies is equal to that of the bright galaxies, at high redshifts they are much stronger clustered, and thus the clustering has to evolve much more slowly.
  • We present results of an investigation of clustering evolution of field galaxies between a redshift of z~1 and the present epoch. The current analysis relies on a sample of ~3600 galaxies from the Calar Alto Deep Imaging Survey (CADIS). The multicolor classification and redshift determination is reliable up to I=23. The redshift distribution extends to z~1.1, the resolution is Delta cz=12000 km s^-1. Thus the amplitude of the three-dimensional correlation function has to be estimated by means of the projected correlation function w(r_p). The validity of the deprojection was tested on the Las Campanas Redshift Survey (LCRS). The LCRS also serves as ''local'' measurement. We invented a new method to overcome the influence of redshift errors on w(r_p). For evolution of the clustering strength the ansatz xi(r_com,z)proportional to (1+z)^q is used. For the galaxies as a whole the evolution parameter turns out to be q~-1.9, according to the prediction of linear theory. A formal dependency on the cosmology is presumably due to the small number of fields observed. However, the measured clustering growth clearly depends on Hubble type. At z~1 early type galaxies are already much stronger clustered, an increase with q~-1 is sufficient to explain the present day amplitude of the correlation function.
  • We present the B-band luminosity function and comoving space and luminosity densities for a sample of 2779 I-band selected field galaxies based on multi-color data from the CADIS survey. The sample is complete down to I_815 = 22 without correction and with completeness correction extends to I_815=23.0. By means of a new multi-color analysis the objects are classified according to their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and their redshifts are determined with typical errors of delta z <= 0.03. We have split our sample into four redshift bins between z=0.1 and z=1.04 and into three SED bins E-Sa,Sa-Sc and starbursting (emission line) galaxies. The evolution of the luminosity function is clearly differential with SED. The normalization phi* of luminosity function for the E-Sa galaxies decreases towards higher redshift, and we find evidence that the comoving galaxy space density decreases with redshift as well. In contrast, we find phi* and the comoving space density increasing with redshift for the Sa-Sc galaxies. For the starburst galaxies we find a steepening of the luminosity function at the faint end and their comoving space density increases with redshift.
  • We use a multi-color classification method introduced by Wolf, Meisenheimer & Roeser (2000) to reliably identify stars, galaxies and quasars in the up to 16-dimensional color space provided by the filter set of the Calar Alto Deep Imaging Survey (CADIS). The samples of stars, galaxies and quasars obtained this way have been used for dedicated studies published in separate papers. The classification is good enough to detect quasars rather completely and efficiently without confirmative spectroscopy. The multi-color redshifts are accurate enough for most statistical applications, e.g. evolutionary studies of the galaxy luminosity function. We characterize our current dataset on the CADIS 1h-, 9h- and 16h-fields. Using Monte-Carlo simulations we model the classification performance expected for CADIS. We present a summary of the classification results and discuss unclassified objects. More than 99% of the whole catalog sample at R<22 (more than 95% at R<23) are successfully classified matching the expectations derived from the simulations. A small number of peculiar objects challenging the classification are discussed in detail. Spectroscopic observations are used to check the reliability of the multi-color classification (6 mistakes among 151 objects with R<24). We also determine the accuracy of the multi-color redshifts which are rather good for galaxies (sigma_z = 0.03) and useful for quasars. We find the classification performance derived from the simulations to compare well with results from the real survey. Finally, we locate areas for potential improvement of the classification.
  • We present initial results from a field survey for extremely red objects (EROs, defined here as (R-K') >= 6 mag) covering 154 square arcminutes of sky, from the first of 7 deep, wide-field K' images obtained as part of the Calar Alto Deep Imaging Survey (CADIS). The 5-sigma point source detection limits are K'=20.5 and R=25.0, while extended-source limits are up to 0.5-0.75 mag brighter. We identify a total of 8 bright EROs with K' =< 19.0. Six of these bright EROs are resolved and are likely to be galaxies, while the remaining 2 are unresolved, with colors consistent with their being low-mass galactic stars. We derive a surface density for the 6 bright, extragalactic EROs of 0.039 +/- 0.016 per sq. arcmin, higher by a factor of 4 than previous values. We estimate that the volume density of bright EROs to be as high as that of nearby Seyfert galaxies.