• We present a detailed radio, X-ray and optical study of a newly discovered Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) supernova remnant (SNR) which we denote MCSNR J0508-6902. Observations from the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the $\textit{XMM-Newton}$ X-ray observatory are complemented by deep H$\alpha$ images and Anglo Australian Telescope AAOmega spectroscopic data to study the SNR shell and its shock-ionisation. Archival data at other wavelengths are also examined. The remnant follows a filled-in shell type morphology in the radio-continuum and has a size of $\sim$74 pc $\times$ 57 pc at the LMC distance. The X-ray emission exhibits a faint soft shell morphology with Fe-rich gas in its interior $-$ indicative of a Type Ia origin. The remnant appears to be mostly dissipated at higher radio-continuum frequencies leaving only the south-eastern limb fully detectable while in the optical it is the western side of the SNR shell that is clearly detected. The best-fit temperature to the shell X-ray emission ($kT = 0.41^{+0.05}_{-0.06}$ keV) is consistent with other large LMC SNRs. We determined an O/Fe ratio of $<21$ and an Fe mass of 0.5-1.8$~M_{\odot}$ in the interior of the remnant, both of which are consistent with the Type Ia scenario. We find an equipartition magnetic field for the remnant of $\sim$28 $\mu$G, a value typical of older SNRs and consistent with other analyses which also infer an older remnant.
  • The high sensitivity of the XMM-Newton instrumentation offers the opportunity to study faint and extended sources in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies such as the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) in detail. The ROSAT PSPC survey of the LMC has revealed more than 700 X-ray sources, among which there are 46 supernova remnants (SNRs) and candidates. We have observed the field around one of the most promising SNR candidates in the ROSAT PSPC catalogue, labelled [HP99] 456 with XMM-Newton, to determine its nature. We investigated the XMM-Newton data along with new radio-continuum, near infrared and optical data. In particular, spectral and morphological studies of the X-ray and radio data were performed. The X-ray images obtained in different energy bands reveal two different structures. Below 1.0 keV the X-ray emission shows the shell-like morphology of an SNR with a diameter of ~73 pc, one of the largest known in the LMC. For its thermal spectrum we estimate an electron temperature of (0.49 +/- 0.12)keV assuming non-equilibrium ionisation. The X-ray images above 1.0 keV reveal a less extended source within the SNR emission, located ~1' west of the centre of the SNR and coincident with bright point sources detected in radio-continuum. This hard component has an extent of 0.9' (i.e. ~13 pc at a distance of ~50 kpc) and a non-thermal spectrum. The hard source coincides in position with the ROSAT source [HP99] 456 and shows an indication for substructure. We firmly identify a new SNR in the LMC with a shell-like morphology and a thermal spectrum. Assuming the SNR to be in the Sedov phase yields an age of ~23 kyr. We explore possible associations of the hard non-thermal emitting component with a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) or background active galactic nuclei (AGN).
  • We report observations with the MIPS instrument aboard the {\it Spitzer Space Telescope} (SST) of four supernova remnants (SNRs) believed to be the result of core-collapse SNe: N132D (0525-69.6), N49B (0525-66.0), N23 (0506-68.0), and 0453-68.5. All four of these SNRs were detected in whole at 24 $\mu$m and in part at 70 $\mu$m. Comparisons with {\it Chandra} broadband X-ray images show an association of infrared (IR) emission with the blast wave. We attribute the observed IR emission to dust that has been collisionally heated by electrons and ions in the hot, X-ray emitting plasma, with grain size distributions appropriate for the LMC and the destruction of small grains via sputtering by ions. As with our earlier analysis of Type Ia SNRs, models can reproduce observed 70/24 $\mu$m ratios only if effects from sputtering are included, destroying small grains. We calculate the mass of dust swept up by the blast wave in these remnants, and we derive a dust-to-gas mass ratio of several times less than the often assumed value of 0.25% for the LMC. We believe that one explanation for this discrepancy could be porous (fluffy) dust grains.
  • Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are presented for the Spitzer SAGE (Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution) survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). IRAC and MIPS 24 um epoch one data are presented. These data represent the deepest, widest mid-infrared CMDs of their kind ever produced in the LMC. Combined with the 2MASS survey, the diagrams are used to delineate the evolved stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud as well as Galactic foreground and extragalactic background populations. Some 32000 evolved stars brighter than the tip of the red giant branch are identified. Of these, approximately 17500 are classified as oxygen-rich, 7000 carbon-rich, and another 1200 as ``extreme'' asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Brighter members of the latter group have been called ``obscured'' AGB stars in the literature owing to their dusty circumstellar envelopes. A large number (1200) of luminous oxygen--rich AGB stars/M supergiants are also identified. Finally, there is strong evidence from the 24 um MIPS channel that previously unexplored, lower luminosity oxygen-rich AGB stars contribute significantly to the mass loss budget of the LMC (1200 such sources are identified).
  • X-ray mosaics of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) taken with the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) have revealed extensive diffuse X-ray emission, indicative of hot >= 10^6 K gas associated with this irregular galaxy on scales from ~10 pc to >= 1000 pc. We have selected regions of large-scale (d >= 600 pc) diffuse X-ray emission, such as supergiant shells, the LMC Spur, and the LMC Bar, and examined the physical conditions of the hot gas associated with them. We find that for these objects the plasma temperatures range from kT ~0.15 - 0.60 keV and the derived electron densities range from n_e ~0.005 - 0.03 cm^-3. Furthermore, we have examined the fraction of diffuse X-ray emission from the LMC and compared it to the total X-ray emission. We find that discrete sources such as X-ray binaries and supernova remnants (SNRs) account for ~41% and ~21% of the X-ray emission from the LMC, respectively. In contrast, diffuse X-ray emission from the field and from supergiant shells account for ~30% and ~6% of the total X-ray emission, respectively.