• Expulsion of ambient flux has been shown to be crucial to obtain high quality factors in bulk niobium SRF cavities. However, there remain many questions as to what properties of the niobium material determine its flux expulsion behavior. In this paper, we present first results from a new study of two cavities that were specially fabricated to study flux expulsion. Both cavities were made from large grain ingot niobium slices, one of which had its slices rolled prior to fabrication, and none these slices were annealed prior to measurement. Expulsion measurements indicate that a dense network of grain boundaries is not necessary for a cavity to have near-complete flux trapping behavior up to large thermal gradients. The results also contribute to a body of evidence that cold work is a strong determinant of flux expulsion behavior in SRF-grade niobium.
  • The radio-frequency surface resistance of niobium resonators is incredibly reduced when nitrogen impurities are dissolved as interstitial in the material, conferring ultra-high Q-factors at medium values of accelerating field. This effect has been observed in both high and low temperature nitrogen treatments. As a matter of fact, the peculiar anti Q-slope observed in nitrogen doped cavities, i.e. the decreasing of the Q-factor with the increasing of the radio-frequency field, come from the decreasing of the BCS surface resistance component as a function of the field. Such peculiar behavior has been considered consequence of the interstitial nitrogen present in the niobium lattice after the doping treatment. The study here presented show the field dependence of the BCS surface resistance of cavities with different resonant frequencies, such as: 650 MHz, 1.3 GHz, 2.6 GHz and 3.9 GHz, and processed with different state-of-the-art surface treatments. These findings show for the first time that the anti Q-slope might be seen at high frequency even for clean Niobium cavities, revealing useful suggestion on the physics underneath the anti Q-slope effect.
  • Nb$_3$Sn has great potential to become the material of choice for fabrication of SRF cavities. The higher critical temperature of Nb$_3$Sn potentially allows for an increased operational temperature in SRF cavities, which could enable tremendous simplification of cryogenic system, leading to significant cost reduction. We present extended characterization of a Nb$_3$Sn coated Nb cavity prepared at Cornell University. Using combination of thermometry during cavity RF measurements, and structural and analytical characterization of the cavity cutouts, we discover Nb$_3$Sn coating flaws responsible for the poor cavity performance. Our results clearly show degraded material quality in the cavity cutouts which exhibit significant heating during the RF testing. Results of extended comparison of cavity cutouts with different dissipation profiles not only point out the cause of significant Q-slope but also establish figures of merit for material qualities in relation to the quality of SRF performance.
  • We report the finding of new surface treatments that permit to manipulate the niobium resonator nitrogen content in the first few nanometers in a controlled way, and the resonator fundamental Mattis-Bardeen surface resistance and residual resistance accordingly. In particular, we find surface infusion conditions that systematically a) increase the quality factor of these 1.3 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) bulk niobium resonators, up to very high gradients; b) increase the achievable accelerating gradient of the cavity compared to its own baseline with state-of-the-art surface processing. Cavities subject to the new surface process have larger than two times the state of the art Q at 2K for accelerating fields > 35 MV/m. Moreover, very high accelerating gradients ~ 45 MV/m are repeatedly reached, which correspond to peak magnetic surface fields of 190 mT, among the highest measured for bulk niobium cavities. These findings open the opportunity to tailor the surface impurity content distribution to maximize performance in Q and gradients, and have therefore very important implications on future performance and cost of SRF based accelerators. They also help deepen the understanding of the physics of the RF niobium cavity surface.
  • Previous work has demonstrated that the radio frequency surface resistance of niobium resonators is dramatically reduced when nitrogen impurities are dissolved as interstitial in the material. The origin of this effect is attributed to the lowering of the Mattis and Bardeen surface resistance contribution with increasing accelerating field. Meanwhile, an enhancement of the sensitivity to trapped magnetic field is typically observed for such cavities. In this paper we conduct the first systematic study on these different components contributing to the total surface resistance as a function of different levels of dissolved nitrogen, in comparison with standard surface treatments for niobium resonators. Adding these results together we are able to show for the first time which is the optimum surface treatment that maximizes the Q-factor of superconducting niobium resonators as a function of expected trapped magnetic field in the cavity walls. These results also provide new insights on the physics behind the change in the field dependence of the Mattis and Bardeen surface resistance, and of the trapped magnetic vortex induced losses in superconducting niobium resonators.
  • Quench of superconducting radio-frequency cavities frequently leads to the lowered quality factor Q0, which had been attributed to the additional trapped magnetic flux. Here we demonstrate that the origin of this magnetic flux is purely extrinsic to the cavity by showing no extra dissipation (unchanged Q0) after quenching in zero magnetic field, which allows us to rule out intrinsic mechanisms of flux trapping such as generation of thermal currents or trapping of the rf field. We also show the clear relation of dissipation introduced by quenching to the orientation of the applied magnetic field and the possibility to fully recover the quality factor by requenching in the compensated field. We discover that for larger values of the ambient field, the Q-factor degradation may become irreversible by this technique, likely due to the outward flux migration beyond the normal zone opening during quench. Our findings are of special practical importance for accelerators based on low- and medium-beta accelerating structures residing close to focusing magnets, as well as for all high-Q cavity-based accelerators.
  • Even when cooled through its transition temperature in the presence of an external magnetic field, a superconductor can expel nearly all external magnetic flux. This Letter presents an experimental study to identify the parameters that most strongly influence flux trapping in high purity niobium during cooldown. This is critical to the operation of superconducting radiofrequency cavities, in which trapped flux degrades the quality factor and therefore cryogenic efficiency. Flux expulsion was measured on a large survey of 1.3 GHz cavities prepared in various ways. It is shown that both spatial thermal gradient and high temperature treatment are critical to expelling external magnetic fields, while surface treatment has minimal effect. For the first time, it is shown that a cavity can be converted from poor expulsion behavior to strong expulsion behavior after furnace treatment, resulting in a substantial improvement in quality factor. Future plans are described to build on this result in order to optimize treatment for future cavities.
  • A Temperature mapping (T-map) system for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities consists of a thermometer array positioned precisely on an exterior cavity wall, capable of detecting small increases in temperature; therefore it is a powerful tool for research on the quality factor (Q0) of SRF cavities. A new multi-cell T-mapping system is has been developed at Cornell University. The system has nearly two thousand thermometers to cover 7-cell SRF cavities for Cornell ERL project. A new multiplexing scheme was adopted to reduce number of wires. A 1mK resolution of the temperature increase Delta T is achieved. A 9-cell cavity of TESLA geometry was tested with the T-map system. By converting Delta T to power loss and quality factor, it has been found that for this cavity, most surface losses were generated by the first cell when the accelerating gradient is increased above 15MV/m. The comparison of Q-value between with and without hotspots shows the heating on cavity wall degraded cavity Q0 about 1.65 times. The power loss on the hotspots is about 40% of the total power. Effective and intuitive ways of displaying surface properties of the cavity interior, e.g. the residual resistivity, will be shown.
  • Over the past years it became evident that the quality factor of a superconducting cavity is not only determined by its surface preparation procedure, but is also influenced by the way the cavity is cooled down. Moreover, different data sets exists, some of them indicate that a slow cool-down through the critical temperature is favourable while other data states the exact opposite. Even so there where speculations and some models about the role of thermo-currents and flux-pinning, the difference in behaviour remained a mystery. In this paper we will for the first time present a consistent theoretical model which we confirmed by data that describes the role of thermo-currents, driven by temperature gradients and material transitions. We will clearly show how they impact the quality factor of a cavity, discuss our findings, relate it to findings at other labs and develop mitigation strategies which especially addresses the issue of achieving high quality factors of so-called nitrogen doped cavities in horizontal test.