• Low mass galaxy cluster systems and groups play an essential role in upcoming cosmological studies such as those to be carried out with eROSITA. Though the effects of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and merging processes are of special importance to quantify biases like selection effects or deviations from hydrostatic equilibrium, they are poorly understood on the galaxy group scale. We present an analysis of recent deep Chandra and XMM-Newton integrations of NGC741, which provides an excellent example of a group with multiple concurrent phenomena: both an old central radio galaxy and a spectacular infalling head-tail source, strongly-bent jets, a 100kpc radio trail, intriguing narrow X-ray filaments, and gas sloshing features. Supported principally by X-ray and radio continuum data, we address the merging history of the group, the nature of the X-ray filaments, the extent of gas stripping from NGC742, the character of cavities in the group, and the roles of the central AGN and infalling galaxy in heating the intra-group medium.
  • The XXL survey currently covers two 25 sq. deg. patches with XMM observations of ~10ks. We summarise the scientific results associated with the first release of the XXL data set, that occurred mid 2016. We review several arguments for increasing the survey depth to 40 ks during the next decade of XMM operations. X-ray (z<2) cluster, (z<4) AGN and cosmic background survey science will then benefit from an extraordinary data reservoir. This, combined with deep multi-$\lambda$ observations, will lead to solid standalone cosmological constraints and provide a wealth of information on the formation and evolution of AGN, clusters and the X-ray background. In particular, it will offer a unique opportunity to pinpoint the z>1 cluster density. It will eventually constitute a reference study and an ideal calibration field for the upcoming eROSITA and Euclid missions.
  • We study Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) activity in the fossil galaxy cluster, RX J1416.4+2315. Radio observations were carried out using Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at two frequencies, 1420 MHz and 610 MHz. A weak radio lobe that extends from the central nucleus is detected in 610 MHz map. Assuming the radio lobe originated from the central AGN, we show the energy injection into the Inter Galactic Medium (IGM) is only sufficient to heat up the central 50 kpc within the cluster core, while the cooling radius is larger ( $\sim$ 130 kpc). In the hardness ratio map, three low energy cavities have been identified. No radio emission is detected for these regions. We evaluated the power required to inflate the cavities and showed that the total energy budget is sufficient to offset the radiative cooling. We showed that the initial conditions would change the results remarkably. Furthermore, efficiency of Bondi accretion to power the AGN has been estimated.
  • We present IRAM 30m telescope observations of the CO(1-0) and (2-1) lines in a sample of 11 group-dominant elliptical galaxies selected from the CLoGS nearby groups sample. Our observations confirm the presence of molecular gas in 4 of the 11 galaxies at >4 sigma significance, and combining these with data from the literature we find a detection rate of 43+-14%, comparable to the detection rate for nearby radio galaxies, suggesting that group-dominant ellipticals may be more likely to contain molecular gas than their non-central counterparts. Those group-dominant galaxies which are detected typically contain ~2x10^8 Msol of molecular gas, and although most have low star formation rates (<1 Msol/yr) they have short depletion times, indicating that the gas must be replenished on timescales ~100 Myr. Almost all of the galaxies contain active nuclei, and we note while the data suggest that CO may be more common in the most radio-loud galaxies, the mass of molecular gas required to power the active nuclei through accretion is small compared to the masses observed. We consider possible origin mechanisms for the gas, through cooling of stellar ejecta within the galaxies, group-scale cooling flows, and gas-rich mergers, and find probable examples of each type within our sample, confirming that a variety of processes act to drive the build up of molecular gas in group-dominant ellipticals.
  • We present new, deep Chandra X-ray and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope 610~MHz observations of the spiral-galaxy-rich compact group HCG 16, which we use to examine nuclear activity, star formation and the high luminosity X-ray binary populations in the major galaxies. We confirm the presence of obscured active nuclei in NGC 833 and NGC 835, and identify a previously unrecognized nuclear source in NGC 838. All three nuclei are variable on timescales of months to years, and for NGC 833 and NGC 835 this is most likely caused by changes in accretion rate. The deep Chandra observations allow us to detect for the first time an Fe-K$\alpha$ emission line in the spectrum of the Seyfert 2 nucleus of NGC 835. We find that NGC 838 and NGC 839 are both starburst-dominated systems, with only weak nuclear activity, in agreement with previous optical studies. We estimate the star formation rates in the two galaxies from their X-ray and radio emission, and compare these results with estimates from the infra-red and ultra-violet bands to confirm that star formation in both galaxies is probably declining after galaxy-wide starbursts were triggered ~400-500 Myr ago. We examine the physical properties of their galactic superwinds, and find that both have temperatures of ~0.8 keV. We also examine the X-ray and radio properties of NGC 848, the fifth largest galaxy in the group, and show that it is dominated by emission from its starburst.
  • We use a combination of deep Chandra X-ray observations and radio continuum imaging to investigate the origin and current state of the intra-group medium in the spiral-rich compact group HCG 16. We confirm the presence of a faint ($L_{X,{\rm bolo}}$=1.87$^{+1.03}_{-0.66}$$\times$10$^{41}$ erg/s), low temperature (0.30$^{+0.07}_{-0.05}$ keV) intra-group medium (IGM) extending throughout the ACIS-S3 field of view, with a ridge linking the four original group members and extending to the southeast, as suggested by previous Rosat and XMM-Newton observations. This ridge contains 6.6$^{+3.9}_{-3.3}$$\times$10$^9$ solar masses of hot gas and is at least partly coincident with a large-scale HI tidal filament, indicating that the IGM in the inner part of the group is highly multi-phase. We present evidence that the group is not yet virialised, and show that gas has probably been transported from the starburst winds of NGC 838 and NGC 839 into the surrounding IGM. Considering the possible origin of the IGM, we argue that material ejected by galactic winds may have played a significant role, contributing 20-40% of the observed hot gas in the system.
  • We study intergalactic medium (IGM) heating in a sample of five fossil galaxy groups by using their radio properties at 610 MHz and 1.4 GHz. The power by radio jets introducing mechanical heating for the sampled objects is not sufficient enough to suppress the cooling flow. Therefore, we discussed shock-, vortex heating, and conduction as alternative heating processes. Further, the 1.4 GHz and 610 MHz radio luminosities of fossil groups are compared to a sample of normal galaxy groups of the same radio brightest (BGGs), stellar mass, and total group stellar mass, quantified using the $K$-band luminosity. It appears that the fossil BGGs are under luminous at 1.4 GHz and 610 MHz for a given BGG stellar mass and luminosity, in comparison to a general population of the groups. In addition, we explore how the bolometric radio luminosity of fossil sample depends on clusters and groups characteristics. Using the HIghest X-ray FLUx Galaxy Cluster Sample (HIFLUGCS) as a control sample we found that the large-scale behaviours of fossil galaxy groups are consistent with their relaxed and virialised nature.
  • We present an analysis of the mid-infrared (MIR) colours of 165 70um-detected galaxies in the Shapley supercluster core (SSC) at z=0.048 using panoramic Spitzer/MIPS 24 and 70um imaging. While the bulk of galaxies show f70/f24 colours typical of local star-forming galaxies, we identify a significant sub-population of 23 70micron-excess galaxies, whose MIR colours (f70/f24>25) are much redder and cannot be reproduced by any of the standard model infrared SEDs. These galaxies are found to be strongly concentrated towards the cores of the five clusters that make up the SSC, and also appear rare among local field galaxies, confirming them as a cluster-specific phenomenon. Their optical spectra and lack of significant UV emission imply little or no ongoing star formation, while fits to their panchromatic SEDs require the far-IR emission to come mostly from a diffuse dust component heated by the general interstellar radiation field rather than ongoing star formation. Most of these 70micron-excess galaxies are identified as ~L* S0s with smooth profiles. We find that almost every cluster galaxy in the process of star-formation quenching is already either an S0 or Sa, while we find no passive galaxies of class Sb or later. Hence the formation of passive early-type galaxies in cluster cores must involve the prior morphological transformation of late-type spirals into Sa/S0s, perhaps via pre-processing or the impact of cluster tidal fields, before a subsequent quenching of star formation once the lenticular encounters the dense environment of the cluster core. In the cases of many cluster S0s, this phase of star-formation quenching is characterised by an excess of 70um emission, indicating that the cold dust content is declining at a slower rate than star formation.
  • Deep X-ray data from CHANDRA and XMM-Newton, and GMRT radio data are presented for ZwCl 2341.1+0000, an extremely unusual and complex merging cluster of galaxies at the intersection of optical filaments. We propose that energetics of multiple mergers and accretion flows has resulted in wide-spread shocks, acceleration of cosmic ray particles and amplification of weak magnetic fields. This results in Mpc-scale peripheral radio relics and halo like non-thermal emission observed near the merging center.
  • Using H_delta and D_n4000 as tracers of recent or ongoing efficient star formation, we analyze the fraction of SDSS galaxies with recent or ongoing efficient star formation (GORES) in the vicinity of 268 clusters. We confirm the well-known segregation of star formation, and using Abel deprojection, we find that the fraction of GORES increases linearly with physical radius and then saturates. Moreover, we find that the fraction of GORES is modulated by the absolute line-of-sight velocity (ALOSV): at all projected radii, higher fractions of GORES are found in higher ALOSV galaxies. We model this velocity modulation of GORES fraction using the particles in a hydrodynamical cosmological simulation, which we classify into virialized, infalling and backsplash according to their position in radial phase space at z=0. Our simplest model, where the GORES fraction is only a function of class does not produce an adequate fit to our observed GORES fraction in projected phase space. On the other hand, assuming that in each class the fraction of GORES rises linearly and then saturates, we are able to find well-fitting 3D models of the fractions of GORES. In our best-fitting models, in comparison with 18% in the virial cone and 13% in the virial sphere, GORES respectively account for 34% and 19% of the infalling and backsplash galaxies, and as much as 11% of the virialized galaxies, possibly as a result of tidally induced star formation from galaxy-galaxy interactions. At the virial radius, the fraction of GORES of the backsplash population is much closer to that of the virialized population than to that of the infalling galaxies. This suggests that the quenching of efficient star formation is nearly complete in a single passage through the cluster.
  • We present a panchromatic study of luminosity functions (LFs) and stellar mass functions (SMFs) of galaxies in the core of the Shapley supercluster at z=0.048, in order to investigate how the dense environment affects the galaxy properties, such as star formation (SF) or stellar masses. We find that while faint-end slopes of optical and NIR LFs steepen with decreasing density, no environment effect is found in the slope of the SMFs. This suggests that mechanisms transforming galaxies in different environments are mainly related to the quench of SF rather than to mass-loss. The Near-UV (NUV) and Far-UV (FUV) LFs obtained have steeper faint-end slopes than the local field population, while the 24$\mu$m and 70$\mu$m galaxy LFs for the Shapley supercluster have shapes fully consistent with those obtained for the local field galaxy population. This apparent lack of environmental dependence for the infrared (IR) LFs suggests that the bulk of the star-forming galaxies that make up the observed cluster IR LF have been recently accreted from the field and have yet to have their SF activity significantly affected by the cluster environment.
  • We present new and archival multi-frequency radio and X-ray data for Centaurus A obtained over almost 20 years at the VLA and with Chandra, with which we measure the X-ray and radio spectral indices of jet knots, flux density variations in the jet knots, polarization variations, and proper motions. We compare the observed properties with current knot formation models and particle acceleration mechanisms. We rule out impulsive particle acceleration as a formation mechanism for all of the knots as we detect the same population of knots in all of the observations and we find no evidence of extreme variability in the X-ray knots. We find the most likely mechanism for all the stationary knots is a collision resulting in a local shock followed by a steady state of prolonged, stable particle acceleration and X-ray synchrotron emission. In this scenario, the X-ray-only knots have radio counterparts that are too faint to be detected, while the radio-only knots are due to weak shocks where no particles are accelerated to X-ray emitting energies. Although the base knots are prime candidates for reconfinement shocks, the presence of a moving knot in this vicinity and the fact that there are two base knots are hard to explain in this model. We detect apparent motion in three knots; however, their velocities and locations provide no conclusive evidence for or against a faster moving `spine' within the jet. The radio-only knots, both stationary and moving, may be due to compression of the fluid.
  • Context: Hierarchal models of large scale structure (LSS) formation predict that galaxy clusters grow via gravitational infall and mergers of (smaller) mass concentrations, such as clusters and galaxy groups. Diffuse radio emission, in the form of radio halos and relics, is found in clusters undergoing a merger, indicating that shocks or turbulence associated with the merger are capable of accelerating electrons to highly relativistic energies. Here we report on radio observations of ZwCl 2341.1+0000, a complex merging structure of galaxies located at z=0.27, using Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations. Aims: The main aim of the observations is to study the nature of the diffuse radio emission in the galaxy cluster ZwCl 2341.1+0000. Methods: We have carried out GMRT 610, 241, and 157 MHz continuum observations of ZwCl 2341.1+0000. The radio observations are combined with X-ray and optical data of the cluster. Results: The GMRT observations show the presence of a double peripheral radio relic in the cluster ZwCl 2341.1+0000. The spectral index is -0.49 \pm 0.18 for the northern relic and -0.76 \pm 0.17 for the southern relic respectively. We have derived values of 0.48-0.93 microGauss for the equipartition magnetic field strength. The relics are probably associated with an outwards traveling merger shock waves.
  • As a part of an ongoing study of a sample of galaxy groups showing evidence for AGN/hot gas interaction, we report on the preliminary results of an analysis of new XMM and GMRT data of the X-ray bright compact group HCG 62. This is one of the few groups known to possess very clear, small X-ray cavities in the inner region as shown by the existing Chandra image. At higher frequencies (>1.4 GHz) the cavities show minimal if any radio emission, but the radio appears clearly at lower frequencies (<610 MHz). We compare and discuss the morphology and spectral properties of the gas and of the radio source. We find that the cavities are close to pressure balance, and that the jets have a "light" hadronic content. By extracting X-ray surface brightness and temperature profiles, we also identify a shock front located around 35 kpc to the south-west of the group center.
  • We present an ongoing study of 18 nearby galaxy groups, chosen for the availability of Chandra and/or XMM-Newton data and evidence for AGN/hot intragroup gas interaction. We have obtained 235 and 610 MHz observations at the GMRT for all the groups, and 327 and 150 MHz for a few. We discuss two interesting cases - NGC 5044 and AWM 4 - which exhibit different kinds of AGN/hot gas interaction. With the help of these examples we show how joining low-frequency radio data (to track the history of AGN outbursts through emission from aged electron populations) with X-ray data (to determine the state of hot gas, its disturbances, heating and cooling) can provide a unique insight into the nature of the feedback mechanism in galaxy groups.
  • (abridged) A Chandra observation of the X-ray bright group NGC 5044 shows that the X-ray emitting gas has been strongly perturbed by recent outbursts from the central AGN and also by motion of the central dominant galaxy relative to the group gas. The NGC 5044 group hosts many small radio quiet cavities with a nearly isotropic distribution, cool filaments, a semi-circular cold front and a two-armed spiral shaped feature of cool gas. A GMRT observation of NGC 5044 at 610 MHz shows the presence of extended radio emission with a "torus-shaped" morphology. The largest X-ray filament appears to thread the radio torus, suggesting that the lower entropy gas within the filament is material being uplifted from the center of the group. The radio emission at 235 MHz is much more extended than the emission at 610 MHz, with little overlap between the two frequencies. One component of the 235 MHz emission passes through the largest X-ray cavity and is then deflected just behind the cold front. A second detached radio lobe is also detected at 235 MHz beyond the cold front. All of the smaller X-ray cavities in the center of NGC 5044 are undetected in the GMRT observations. Since the smaller bubbles are probably no longer momentum driven by the central AGN, their motion will be affected by the group "weather" as they buoyantly rise outward. Hence, most of the enthalpy within the smaller bubbles will likely be deposited near the group center and isotropized by the group weather. The total mechanical power of the smaller radio quiet cavities is $P_c = 9.2 \times 10^{41}$erg s$^{-1}$ which is sufficient to suppress about one-half of the total radiative cooling within the central 10 kpc. This is consistent with the presence of H$\alpha$ emission within this region which shows that at least some of the gas is able to cool.
  • The lack of very cool gas at the cores of groups and clusters of galaxies, even where the cooling time is significantly shorter than the Hubble time, has been interpreted as evidence of sources that re-heat the intergalactic medium. Most studies of rich clusters adopt AGN feedback to be this source of heating. From ongoing GMRT projects involving clusters and groups, we demonstrate how low-frequency GMRT radio observations, together with Chandra/XMM-Newton X-ray data, present a unique insight into the nature of feedback, and of the energy transfer between the AGN and the IGM.
  • We present results from combined low-frequency radio and X-ray studies of nearby galaxy groups. We consider two main areas: firstly, the evolutionary process from spiral-dominated, HI-rich groups to elliptical-dominated systems with hot, X-ray emitting gas halos; secondly, the mechanism of AGN feedback which appears to balance radiative cooling of the hot halos of evolved groups. The combination of radio and X-ray observations provides a powerful tool for these studies, allowing examination of gas in both hot and cool phases, and of the effects of shock heating and AGN outbursts. Low-frequency radio data are effective in detecting older and less energetic electron populations and are therefore vital for the determination of the energetics and history of such events. We present results from our ongoing study of Stephan's Quintet, a spiral-rich group in which tidal interactions and shock heating appear to be transforming HI in the galaxies into a diffuse X-ray emitting halo, and show examples of AGN feedback from our sample of elliptical-dominated groups, where multi-band low-frequency radio data have proved particularly useful.
  • We study the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) in the nearby early-type galaxy Centaurus A, concentrating primarily on two aspects of binary populations: the XLF behavior at the low luminosity limit and comparison between globular cluster and field sources. The 800 ksec exposure of the deep Chandra VLP program allows us to reach a limiting luminosity of 8e35 erg/s, about 2-3 times deeper than previous investigations. We confirm the presence of the low luminosity break in the overall LMXB XLF at log(L_X)=37.2-37.6 below which the luminosity distribution follows a constant dN/d(ln L). Separating globular cluster and field sources, we find a statistically significant difference between the two luminosity distributions with a relative underabundance of faint sources in the globular cluster population. This demonstrates that the samples are drawn from distinct parent populations and may disprove the hypothesis that the entire LMXB population in early type galaxies is created dynamically in globular clusters. As a plausible explanation for this difference in the XLFs, we suggest that there is an enhanced fraction of helium accreting systems in globular clusters, which are created in collisions between red giants and neutron stars. Due to the 4 times higher ionization temperature of He, such systems are subject to accretion disk instabilities at approximately 20 times higher mass accretion rate, and therefore are not observed as persistent sources at low luminosities.
  • We use a deep Chandra observation to examine the structure of the hot intra-group medium of the compact group of galaxies Stephan's Quintet. The group is thought to be undergoing a strong dynamical interaction as an interloper, NGC 7318b, passes through the group core at ~850 km/s. A bright ridge of X-ray and radio continuum emission has been interpreted as the result of shock heating, with support from observations at other wavelengths. We find that gas in this ridge has a similar temperature (~0.6 keV) and abundance (~0.3 solar) to the surrounding diffuse emission, and that a hard emission component is consistent with that expected from high-mass X-ray binaries associated with star-formation in the ridge. The cooling rate of gas in the ridge is consistent with the current star formation rate, suggesting that radiative cooling is driving the observed star formation. The lack of a high-temperature gas component is used to place constraints on the nature of the interaction and shock, and we find that an oblique shock heating a pre-existing filament of HI may be the most likely explanation of the X-ray gas in the ridge. The mass of hot gas in the ridge is only ~2 per cent of the total mass of hot gas in the group, which is roughly equal to the deficit in observed HI mass compared to predictions. The hot gas component is too extended to have been heated by the current interaction, strongly suggesting that it must have been heated during previous dynamical encounters.
  • We present new results on the shock around the southwest radio lobe of Centaurus A using data from the Chandra Very Large Programme observations. The X-ray spectrum of the emission around the outer southwestern edge of the lobe is well described by a single power-law model with Galactic absorption -- thermal models are strongly disfavoured, except in the region closest to the nucleus. We conclude that a significant fraction of the X-ray emission around the southwest part of the lobe is synchrotron, not thermal. We infer that in the region where the shock is strongest and the ambient gas density lowest, the inflation of the lobe is accelerating particles to X-ray synchrotron emitting energies, similar to supernova remnants such as SN1006. This interpretation resolves a problem of our earlier, purely thermal, interpretation for this emission, namely that the density compression across the shock was required to be much larger than the theoretically expected factor of 4. We estimate that the lobe is expanding to the southwest with a velocity of ~2600 km/s, roughly Mach 8 relative to the ambient medium. We discuss the spatial variation of spectral index across the shock region, concluding that our observations constrain gamma_max for the accelerated particles to be 10^8 at the strongest part of the shock, consistent with expectations from diffusive shock acceleration theory. Finally, we consider the implications of these results for the production of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and TeV emission from Centaurus A, concluding that the shock front region is unlikely to be a significant source of UHECRs, but that TeV emission from this region is expected at levels comparable to current limits at TeV energies, for plausible assumed magnetic field strengths.
  • We present a detailed radio morphological study and spectral analysis of the wide-angle-tail radio source 4C +24.36 associated with the dominant galaxy in the relaxed galaxy cluster AWM 4. Our study is based on new high sensitivity GMRT observations at 235 MHz, 327 MHz and 610 MHz, and on literature and archival data at other frequencies. We find that the source major axis is likely oriented at a small angle with respect to the plane of the sky. The wide-angle-tail morphology can be reasonably explained by adopting a simple hydrodynamical model in which both ram pressure (driven by the motion of the host galaxy) and buoyancy forces contribute to bend the radio structure. The spectral index progressively steepens along the source major axis from $\alpha \sim$0.3 in the region close to the radio nucleus to beyond 1.5 in the lobes. The results of the analysis of the spectral index image allow us to derive an estimate of the radiative age of the source of $\sim$ 160 Myr. The cluster X-ray emitting gas has a relaxed morphology and short cooling time, but its temperature profile is isothermal out to at least 160 kpc from the centre. Therefore we seek evidence of energy ejection from the central AGN to prevent catastrophic cooling. We find that the energy injected by 4C +24.36 in the form of synchrotron luminosity during its lifetime is far less than the energy required to maintain the high gas temperature in the core. We also find that it is not possible for the central source to eject the requisite energy in the intracluster gas in terms of the enthalpy of buoyant bubbles of relativistic fluid, without creating discernible large cavities in the existing X-ray XMM-Newton observations.
  • We present preliminary results from a deep (600 ks) {\em Chandra} observation of the hot interstellar medium of the nearby early-type galaxy Centaurus A (Cen A). We find a surface brightness discontinuity in the gas $\sim$3.5 kpc from the nucleus spanning a 120$^\circ$ arc. The temperature of the gas is 0.60$\pm$0.05 and 0.68$\pm$0.10 keV, interior and exterior to the discontinuity, respectively. The elemental abundance is poorly constrained by the spectral fits, but if the abundance is constant across the discontinuity, there is a factor of 2.3$\pm$0.4 pressure jump across the discontinuity. This would imply that the gas is moving at 470$\pm$100 km s$^{-1}$, or Mach 1.0$\pm$0.2 (1.2$\pm$0.2) relative to the sound speed of the gas external (internal) to the discontinuity. Alternatively, pressure balance could be maintained if there is a large (factor of $\sim$7) discontinuity in the elemental abundance. We suggest that the observed discontinuity is the result of non-hydrostatic motion of the gas core (i.e. sloshing) due to the recent merger. In this situation, both gas motions and abundance gradients are important in the visibility of the discontinuity. Cen A is in the late stages of merging with a small late-type galaxy, and a large discontinuity in density and abundance across a short distance demonstrates that the gas of the two galaxies remains poorly mixed even several hundred million years after the merger. The pressure discontinuity may have had a profound influence on the temporal evolution of the kpc-scale jet. The jet could have decollimated crossing the discontinuity and thereby forming the northeast radio lobe.
  • We report an X-ray spectral study of the transverse structure of the Centaurus A jet using new data from the Chandra Cen A Very Large Project. We find that the spectrum steepens with increasing distance from the jet axis, and that this steepening can be attributed to a change in the average spectrum of the knotty emission. Such a trend is unexpected if the knots are predominantly a surface feature residing in a shear layer between faster and slower flows. We suggest that the spectral steepening of the knot emission as a function of distance from the jet axis is due to knot migration, implying a component of transverse motion of knots within the flow.
  • We present new deep Chandra observations of the Centaurus A jet, with a combined on-source exposure time of 719 ks. These data allow detailed X-ray spectral measurements to be made along the jet out to its disappearance at 4.5 kpc from the nucleus. We distinguish several regimes of high-energy particle acceleration: while the inner part of the jet is dominated by knots and has properties consistent with local particle acceleration at shocks, the particle acceleration in the outer 3.4 kpc of the jet is likely to be dominated by an unknown distributed acceleration mechanism. In addition to several compact counterjet features we detect probable extended emission from a counterjet out to 2.0 kpc from the nucleus, and argue that this implies that the diffuse acceleration process operates in the counterjet as well. A preliminary search for X-ray variability finds no jet knots with dramatic flux density variations, unlike the situation seen in M87.