• We present a comparative analysis of the impact of the non-perturbative intrinsic charm quark content of the proton on differential cross section of $\gamma +c $-jet in $ pp $ and $ p\bar{p} $ collisions, for the kinematic regions that are sensitive to this contribution. We discuss the $ Q^2 $ evolution of intrinsic quark distributions and present a code which provide these distributions as a function of $ x $ and $ Q^2 $ for any arbitrary Fock state probability. For the $ p\bar{p} $ collisions at the Tevatron, the results are compared with the recent experimental data of D0 at $\sqrt{s} =1.96$ TeV and also predictions for $ pp $ collisions at $\sqrt{s} =8$ TeV and $\sqrt{s} =13$ TeV for the LHC.
  • In most non-perturbative methods in hadron physics the calculations are started with a correlation function in terms of some interpolating and transition currents in $ x $-space. For simplicity, the calculations are then transformed to the momentum space by a Fourier transformation.To suppress the contributions of the higher states and continuum; and enhance the ground state contribution, Borel transformation as well as continuum subtraction are applied by the help of quark-hadron duality assumption. In the present study we work out the mathematics required for these processes in the case of light and multi-heavy hadrons. We address a well-known problem in subtraction of the effects of the higher states and continuum and discuss how we find finite results without any divergence by using an appropriate representation of the modified Bessel functions, appearing in the heavy quark propagator, and successive applications of the Borel transformations, which lead to more suppression of the higher states and continuum contributions. The results obtained can be used in determination of the spectroscopic and decay properties of the multi-heavy standard and non-conventional (exotic) systems in many non-perturbative methods, specially the QCD sum rules.
  • We present the photometric and spectroscopic evolution of the type Ic supernova LSQ14efd, discovered by the La Silla QUEST survey and followed by PESSTO. LSQ14efd was discovered few days after explosion and the observations cover up to ~100 days. The early photometric points show the signature of the cooling of the shock break-out event experienced by the progenitor at the time of the supernova explosion, one of the first for a type Ic supernova. A comparison with type Ic supernova spectra shows that LSQ14efd is quite similar to the type Ic SN 2004aw. These two supernovae have kinetic energies that are intermediate between standard Ic explosions and those which are the most energetic explosions known (e.g. SN 1998bw). We computed an analytical model for the light-curve peak and estimated the mass of the ejecta 6.3 +/- 0.5 Msun, a synthesized nickel mass of 0.25 Msun and a kinetic energy of Ekin = 5.6 +/- 0.5 x 10^51 erg. No connection between LSQ14efd and a GRB event could be established. However we point out that the supernova shows some spectroscopic similarities with the peculiar SN-Ia 1999ac and the SN-Iax SN 2008A. A core-collapse origin is most probable considering the spectroscopic, photometric evolution and the detection of the cooling of the shock break-out.
  • We present and analyse an extensive dataset of the superluminous supernova (SLSN) LSQ14mo (z = 0.256), consisting of a multi-colour lightcurve from -30 d to +70 d in the rest-frame and a series of 6 spectra from PESSTO covering -7 d to +50 d. This is among the densest spectroscopic coverage, and best-constrained rising lightcurve, for a fast-declining hydrogen-poor SLSN. The bolometric lightcurve can be reproduced with a millisecond magnetar model with ~ 4 M_sol ejecta mass, and the temperature and velocity evolution is also suggestive of a magnetar as the power source. Spectral modelling indicates that the SN ejected ~ 6 M_sol of CO-rich material with a kinetic energy of ~ 7 x 10^51 erg, and suggests a partially thermalised additional source of luminosity between -2 d and +22 d. This may be due to interaction with a shell of material originating from pre-explosion mass loss. We further present a detailed analysis of the host galaxy system of LSQ14mo. PESSTO and GROND imaging show three spatially resolved bright regions, and we used the VLT and FORS2 to obtain a deep (five-hour exposure) spectra of the SN position and the three star-forming regions, which are at a similar redshift. The FORS spectrum at +300 days shows no trace of SN emission lines and we place limits on the strength of [O I] from comparisons with other Ic SNe. The deep spectra provides a unique chance to investigate spatial variations in the host star-formation activity and metallicity. The specific star-formation rate is similar in all three components, as is the presence of a young stellar population. However, the position of LSQ14mo exhibits a lower metallicity, with 12 + log(O/H) = 8.2 in both the R23 and N2 scales (corresponding to ~ 0.3 Z_sol). We propose that the three bright regions in the host system are interacting, which thus triggers star-formation and forms young stellar populations.
  • The LaSilla/QUEST Variability Survey (LSQ) and the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP II) are collaborating to discover and obtain photometric light curves for a large sample of low redshift (z < 0.1) Type Ia supernovae. The supernovae are discovered in the LSQ survey using the 1 m ESO Schmidt telescope at the La Silla Observatory with the 10 square degree QUEST camera. The follow-up photometric observations are carried out using the 1 m Swope telescope and the 2.5 m du Pont telescopes at the Las Campanas Observatory. This paper describes the survey, discusses the methods of analyzing the data and presents the light curves for the first 31 Type Ia supernovae obtained in the survey. The SALT 2.4 supernova light curve fitter was used to analyze the photometric data, and the Hubble diagram for this first sample is presented. The measurement errors for these supernovae averaged 4%, and their intrinsic spread was 14%.
  • We assemble a sample of 24 hydrogen-poor super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe). Parameterizing the light curve shape through rise and decline timescales shows that the two are highly correlated. Magnetar-powered models can reproduce the correlation, with the diversity in rise and decline rates driven by the diffusion timescale. Circumstellar interaction models can exhibit a similar rise-decline relation, but only for a narrow range of densities, which may be problematic for these models. We find that SLSNe are approximately 3.5 magnitudes brighter and have light curves 3 times broader than SNe Ibc, but that the intrinsic shapes are similar. There are a number of SLSNe with particularly broad light curves, possibly indicating two progenitor channels, but statistical tests do not cleanly separate two populations. The general spectral evolution is also presented. Velocities measured from Fe II are similar for SLSNe and SNe Ibc, suggesting that diffusion time differences are dominated by mass or opacity. Flat velocity evolution in most SLSNe suggests a dense shell of ejecta. If opacities in SLSNe are similar to other SNe Ibc, the average ejected mass is higher by a factor 2-3. Assuming $\kappa=0.1\,$cm$^2\,$g$^{-1}$, we estimate a mean (median) SLSN ejecta mass of 10$\,$M$_\odot$ (6$\,$M$_\odot$), with a range of 3-30$\,$M$_\odot$. Doubling the assumed opacity brings the masses closer to normal SNe Ibc, but with a high-mass tail. The most probable mechanism for generating SLSNe seems to be the core-collapse of a very massive hydrogen-poor star, forming a millisecond magnetar.
  • We present data for LSQ14bdq, a hydrogen-poor super-luminous supernova (SLSN) discovered by the La Silla QUEST survey and classified by the Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey of Transient Objects. The spectrum and light curve are very similar to slow-declining SLSNe such as PTF12dam. However, detections within ~1 day after explosion show a bright and relatively fast initial peak, lasting for ~15 days, prior to the usual slow rise to maximum light. The broader, main peak can be fit with either central engine or circumstellar interaction models. We discuss the implications of the precursor peak in the context of these models. It is too bright and narrow to be explained as a normal 56Ni-powered SN, and we suggest that interaction models may struggle to fit the two peaks simultaneously. We propose that the initial peak may arise from the post-shock cooling of extended stellar material, and reheating by a central engine drives the second peak. In this picture, we show that an explosion energy of ~2x10^{52} erg and a progenitor radius of a few hundred solar radii would be required to power the early emission. The competing engine models involve rapidly spinning magnetars (neutron stars) or fall-back accretion onto a central black hole. The prompt energy required may favour the black hole scenario. The bright initial peak effectively rules out a compact Wolf-Rayet star as a progenitor, since the inferred energies and ejected masses become unphysical.
  • We show that, for 200 fs light pulses at 790 nm, the formation of filaments is strongly affected by the laser light polarization . Filamentation does not exist for a pure circularly polarized light, propagating in vacuum before focusing in air, while there is no difference for focusing the light in air or vacuum for linearly polarized light.