• We present new abundance measurements for eleven GCs in the Local Group galaxies NGC 147, NGC 6822, and Messier 33. These are combined with previously published observations of four GCs in the Fornax and WLM galaxies. The abundances were determined from analysis of integrated-light spectra, obtained with HIRES on the Keck I telescope and with UVES on the VLT. We find that the clusters with [Fe/H]<-1.5 are all alpha-enhanced at about the same level as Milky Way GCs. Their Na abundances are also generally enhanced relative to Milky Way halo stars, suggesting that these extragalactic GCs resemble their Milky Way counterparts in containing significant fractions of Na-rich stars. For [Fe/H]>-1.5, the GCs in M33 are also alpha-enhanced, while the GCs that belong to dwarfs (NGC 6822 SC7 and Fornax 4) have closer to Solar-scaled alpha-element abundances, thus mimicking the abundance trends observed in field stars in nearby dwarf galaxies. The abundance patterns in SC7 are remarkably similar to those in the Galactic GC Ruprecht 106, including significantly sub-solar [Na/Fe] and [Ni/Fe] ratios. In NGC 147, the GCs with [Fe/H]<-2.0 account for about 6% of the total luminosity of stars in the same metallicity range, a lower fraction than those previously found in the Fornax and WLM galaxies, but substantially higher than in the Milky Way halo.
  • Studies during the last decade have revealed that nearly all Globular Clusters (GCs) host multiple populations (MPs) of stars with a distinctive chemical patterns in light elements. No evidence of such MPs has been found so far in lower-mass ($< \sim 10^4$ M$_{\odot}$) open clusters nor in intermediate age (1-2 Gyr) massive ($> 10^5$ M$_{\odot}$) clusters in the Local Group. Young massive clusters (YMCs) have masses and densities similar to those expected of young GCs in the early universe, and their near-infrared (NIR) spectra are dominated by the light of red super giants (RSGs). The spectra of these stars may be used to determine the cluster's abundances, even though the individual stars cannot be spatially resolved from one another. We carry out a differential analysis between the Al lines of YMC NGC 1705: 1 and field Small Magellanic Cloud RSGs with similar metallicities. We exclude at high confidence extreme [Al/Fe] enhancements similar to those observed in GCs like NGC 2808 or NGC 6752. However, smaller variations cannot be excluded.
  • Recently, Li et al. (2016) claimed to have found evidence for multiple generations of stars in the intermediate age clusters NGC 1783, NGC 1696 and NGC 411 in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC/SMC). Here we show that these young stellar populations are present in the field regions around these clusters and are not likely associated with the clusters themselves. Using the same datasets, we find that the background subtraction method adopted by the authors does not adequately remove contaminating stars in the small number Poisson limit. Hence, we conclude that their results do not provide evidence of young generations of stars within these clusters.
  • Some formation scenarios that have been put forward to explain multiple populations within Globular Clusters (GCs) require that the young massive cluster have large reservoirs of cold gas within them, which is necessary to form future generations of stars. In this paper we use deep observations taken with Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) to assess the amount of molecular gas within 3 young (50-200 Myr) massive (~10^6 Msun) clusters in the Antennae galaxies. No significant CO(3--2) emission was found associated with any of the three clusters. We place upper limits for the molecular gas within these clusters of ~1x10^5 Msun (or <9 % of the current stellar mass). We briefly review different scenarios that propose multiple episodes of star formation and discuss some of their assumptions and implications. Our results are in tension with the predictions of GC formation scenarios that expect large reservoirs of cool gas within young massive clusters at these ages.
  • The Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP) is an ongoing panchromatic imaging survey of stellar populations in the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud that reaches into the sub-solar mass regime (< 0.5 Mo). HTTP utilizes the capability of HST to operate the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in parallel to study this remarkable region in the near-ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared spectral regions, including narrow band H$\alpha$ images. The combination of all these bands provides a unique multi-band view. The resulting maps of the stellar content of the Tarantula Nebula within its main body provide the basis for investigations of star formation in an environment resembling the extreme conditions found in starburst galaxies and in the early Universe. Access to detailed properties of individual stars allows us to begin to reconstruct the evolution of the stellar skeleton of the Tarantula Nebula over space and time with parcsec-scale resolution. In this first paper we describe the observing strategy, the photometric techniques, and the upcoming data products from this survey and present preliminary results obtained from the analysis of the initial set of near-infrared observations.
  • We report the discovery of a ring-like cluster complex in the starburst galaxy NGC 2146. The Ruby Ring, so named due to its appearance, shows a clear ring-like distribution of star clusters around a central object. It is located in one of the tidal streams which surround the galaxy. NGC 2146 is part of the Snapshot Hubble U-band Cluster Survey (SHUCS). The WFC3/F336W data has added critical information to the available archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging set of NGC 2146, allowing us to determine ages, masses, and extinctions of the clusters in the Ruby Ring. These properties have then been used to investigate the formation of this extraordinary system. We find evidence of a spatial and temporal correlation between the central cluster and the clusters in the ring. The latter are about 4 Myr younger than the central cluster, which has an age of 7 Myr. This result is supported by the H alpha emission which is strongly coincident with the ring, and weaker at the position of the central cluster. From the derived total H alpha luminosity of the system we constrain the star formation rate density to be quite high, e.g. ~ 0.47 Msun/yr/kpc^2. The Ruby Ring is the product of an intense and localised burst of star formation, similar to the extended cluster complexes observed in M51 and the Antennae, but more impressive because is quite isolated. The central cluster contains only 5 % of the total stellar mass in the clusters that are determined within the complex. The ring-like morphology, the age spread, and the mass ratio support a triggering formation scenario for this complex. We discuss the formation of the Ruby Ring in a "collect & collapse" framework. The predictions made by this model agree quite well with the estimated bubble radius and expansion velocity produced by the feedback from the central cluster, making the Ruby Ring an interesting case of triggered star formation.
  • The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) is an on-going HST Multicycle Treasury program to image ~1/3 of M31's star forming disk in 6 filters, from the UV to the NIR. The full survey will resolve the galaxy into more than 100 million stars with projected radii from 0-20 kpc over a contiguous 0.5 square degree area in 828 orbits, producing imaging in the F275W and F336W filters with WFC3/UVIS, F475W and F814W with ACS/WFC, and F110W and F160W with WFC3/IR. The resulting wavelength coverage gives excellent constraints on stellar temperature, bolometric luminosity, and extinction for most spectral types. The photometry reaches SNR=4 at F275W=25.1, F336W=24.9, F475W=27.9, F814W=27.1, F110W=25.5, and F160W=24.6 for single pointings in the uncrowded outer disk; however, the optical and NIR data are crowding limited, and the deepest reliable magnitudes are up to 5 magnitudes brighter in the inner bulge. All pointings are dithered and produce Nyquist-sampled images in F475W, F814W, and F160W. We describe the observing strategy, photometry, astrometry, and data products, along with extensive tests of photometric stability, crowding errors, spatially-dependent photometric biases, and telescope pointing control. We report on initial fits to the structure of M31's disk, derived from the density of RGB stars, in a way that is independent of the assumed M/L and is robust to variations in dust extinction. These fits also show that the 10 kpc ring is not just a region of enhanced recent star formation, but is instead a dynamical structure containing a significant overdensity of stars with ages >1 Gyr. (Abridged)
  • I review the characteristics of cluster populations in other galaxies, with particular emphasis on young star clusters and a comparison with the (known) open cluster population of the Milky Way. Young globular cluster-like (compact, massive) objects can still form at the present epoch, even in relatively quiescent spiral discs, as well as starbursts. Comparison with other nearby spiral galaxies, like M83 and NGC 6946, suggests that the Milky Way should host about 20 clusters with masses above 10^5 Msun and ages younger than about 200 Myr. No such clusters have been found, however. I discuss the important roles of selection and evolutionary effects that may account for many of the apparent differences between cluster populations in different galaxies. One potentially important difference between ancient GCs and young star clusters is the presence of complex star formation / chemical enrichment histories in the GCs. Little is currently known about the presence or absence of such features in massive (>10^5 Msun) young star clusters, but some tantalizing hints of extended star formation histories are now emerging also in young clusters.
  • We present colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) for a sample of seven young massive clusters in the galaxies NGC 1313, NGC 1569, NGC 1705, NGC 5236 and NGC 7793. The clusters have ages in the range 5-50 million years and masses of 10^5 -10^6 Msun. Although crowding prevents us from obtaining photometry in the central regions of the clusters, we are still able to measure up to 30-100 supergiant stars in each of the richest clusters, along with the brighter main sequence stars. The resulting CMDs and luminosity functions are compared with photometry of artificially generated clusters, designed to reproduce the photometric errors and completeness as realistically as possible. In agreement with previous studies, our CMDs show no clear gap between the H-burning main sequence and the He-burning supergiant stars, contrary to predictions by common stellar isochrones. In general, the isochrones also fail to match the observed number ratios of red-to-blue supergiant stars, although the difficulty of separating blue supergiants from the main sequence complicates this comparison. In several cases we observe a large spread (1-2 mag) in the luminosities of the supergiant stars that cannot be accounted for by observational errors. This spread can be reproduced by including an age spread of 10-30 million years in the models. However, age spreads cannot fully account for the observed morphology of the CMDs and other processes, such as the evolution of interacting binary stars, may also play a role.
  • Optical/near-infrared observations for 14 globular cluster (GC) systems in early- type galaxies are presented. We investigate the recent claims (Yoon, Yi & Lee 2006) of colour bimodality in GC systems being an artefact of the non linear colour - metallicity transformation driven by the horizontal branch morphology. Taking the advantage of the fact that the combination of optical and near-infrared colours can in principle break the age/metallicity degeneracy we also analyse age distributions in these systems.
  • The initial cluster mass function (ICMF) in spiral galaxy discs is constrained and compared with data for old globular clusters and young clusters in starbursts. It is found that the observed ages and luminosities of the brightest clusters in spiral discs can be reproduced if the ICMF is a Schechter function with a cut-off mass (Mc) of a few times 10^5 Msun and disruption of optically visible clusters is dominated by relatively slow secular evolution. A direct Schechter function fit to the combined cluster MF for all spirals in the sample studied here yields Mc = (2.1+/-0.4)x10^5 Msun. The MFs in cluster-poor and cluster-rich spirals are statistically indistinguishable. An Mc=2.1x10^5 Msun Schechter function also fits the MF of young clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud. If the same ICMF applies in the Milky Way, a bound cluster with M>10^5 Msun will form about once every 10 Myr, while an M>10^6 Msun cluster will form only once every 50 Gyr. Luminosity functions (LFs) of model cluster populations drawn from an Mc=2.1x10^5 Msun Schechter ICMF generally agree with LFs observed in spiral galaxies. It is thus concluded that the ICMF in present-day spiral discs can be modelled as a Schechter function with Mc = 200,000 Msun. However, the presence of significant numbers of M>10^6 Msun (and even M>10^7 Msun) clusters in some starburst galaxies makes it unlikely that the Mc value derived for spirals is universal. In high-pressure environments, such as those created by complex gas kinematics and feedback in mergers, Mc can shift to higher masses than in quiescent discs.
  • Aims. We study the connection between spatially resolved star formation and young star clusters across the disc of M51. Methods. We combine star cluster data based on B, V, and I-band Hubble Space Telescope ACS imaging, together with new WFPC2 U-band photometry to derive ages, masses, and extinctions of 1580 resolved star clusters using SSP models. This data is combined with data on the spatially resolved star formation rates and gas surface densities, as well as Halpha and 20cm radio-continuum (RC) emission, which allows us to study the spatial correlations between star formation and star clusters. Two-point autocorrelation functions are used to study the clustering of star clusters as a function of spatial scale and age. Results. We find that the clustering of star clusters among themselves decreases both with spatial scale and age, consistent with hierarchical star formation. The slope of the autocorrelation functions are consistent with projected fractal dimensions in the range of 1.2-1.6, which is similar to other galaxies, therefore suggesting that the fractal dimension of hierarchical star formation is universal. Both star and cluster formation peak at a galactocentric radius of 2.5 and 5 kpc, which we tentatively attribute to the presence of the 4:1 resonance and the co-rotation radius. The positions of the youngest (<10 Myr) star clusters show the strongest correlation with the spiral arms, Halpha, and the RC emission, and these correlations decrease with age. The azimuthal distribution of clusters in terms of kinematic age away from the spiral arms indicates that the majority of the clusters formed 5-20 Myr before their parental gas cloud reached the centre of the spiral arm.
  • Aims: We study a peculiar object with a projected position close to the nucleus of M51. It is unusually large for a star cluster in M51 and we therefore investigate the three most likely options to explain this object: (a) a background galaxy, (b) a cluster in the disk of M51 and (c) a cluster in M51, but in front of the disk. Methods: We use HST/ACS and HST/NICMOS broad-band photometry to study the properties of this object. Assuming the object is a star cluster, we fit the metallicity, age, mass and extinction using simple stellar population models. Assuming the object is a background galaxy, we estimate the extinction from the colour of the background around the object. We study the structural parameters of the object by fitting the spatial profile with analytical models. Results: We find de-reddened colours of the object which are bluer than expected for a typical elliptical galaxy, and the central surface brightness is brighter than the typical surface brightness of a disc galaxy. It is therefore not likely that the object is a background galaxy. Assuming the object is a star cluster in the disc of M51, we estimate an age and mass of 0.7 Gyr and 2.2 x 10^5 \msun, respectively (with the extinction fixed to E(B-V) = 0.2). Considering the large size of the object, we argue that in this scenario we observe the cluster just prior to final dissolution. If we fit for the extinction as a free parameter, a younger age is allowed and the object is not close to final dissolution. Alternatively, the object could be a star cluster in M51, but in front of the disc, with an age of 1.4 Gyr and mass M = 1.7 x 10^5 \msun. Its effective radius is between ~12-25 pc. This makes the object a "fuzzy star cluster", raising the issue of how an object of this age would end up outside the disc.
  • CONTEXT: Until now, only one planetary nebula (PN) has been known in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy. AIMS: The discovery of a second PN candidate, associated with one of the 5 globular clusters in the Fornax dwarf, is reported. METHODS: Spectra of the globular cluster H5, obtained with the UVES echelle spectrograph on the ESO Very Large Telescope, show [O III] line emission at a radial velocity consistent with membership of the Fornax dwarf. A possible counterpart of the [O III] emission is identified in archival images from the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The source of the emission is located about 1.5" (less than one core radius) southwest of the centre of the cluster. RESULTS: The emission line source is identified as a likely PN, albeit with several peculiar properties. No Hbeta, He I, or He II line emission is detected and the [O III]/Hbeta ratio is >25 (2 sigma). The expansion velocity inferred from the [O III] 5007 AA line is about 55 km/s, which is large for a PN. The diameter measured on the HST images is about 0.23" or 0.15 pc at the distance of the Fornax dSph. CONCLUSIONS: This object doubles the number of known PNe in Fornax, and is only the 5th PN associated with an old GC for which direct imaging is available. It may be a member of the rare class of extremely H-deficient PNe, the second such case found in a GC.
  • We present new H-band echelle spectra, obtained with the NIRSPEC spectrograph at Keck II, for the massive star cluster "B" in the nearby dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 1569. From spectral synthesis and equivalent width measurements we obtain abundances and abundance patterns. We derive an Fe abundance of [Fe/H]=-0.63+/-0.08, a super-solar [alpha/Fe] abundance ratio of +0.31+/-0.09, and an O abundance of [O/H]=-0.29+/-0.07. We also measure a low 12C/13C = 5+/-1 isotopic ratio. Using archival imaging from the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board HST, we construct a colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) for the cluster in which we identify about 60 red supergiant (RSG) stars, consistent with the strong RSG features seen in the H-band spectrum. The mean effective temperature of these RSGs, derived from their observed colours and weighted by their estimated H-band luminosities, is 3790 K, in excellent agreement with our spectroscopic estimate of Teff = 3800+/-200 K. From the CMD we derive an age of 15-25 Myr, slightly older than previous estimates based on integrated broad-band colours. We derive a radial velocity of -78+/-3 km/s and a velocity dispersion of 9.6+/-0.3 km/s. In combination with an estimate of the half-light radius of 0.20"+/-0.05" from the HST data, this leads to a dynamical mass of (4.4+/-1.1)E5 Msun. The dynamical mass agrees very well with the mass predicted by simple stellar population models for a cluster of this age and luminosity, assuming a normal stellar IMF. The cluster core radius appears smaller at longer wavelengths, as has previously been found in other extragalactic young star clusters.
  • With HST, colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) can be obtained for young star clusters well beyond the Local Group. Such data can help constrain cluster ages and metallicities, and also provide a reference against which intermediate- and high mass stellar models can be compared. Here, CMDs are presented for two massive (>10^5 Msun) clusters and compared with Padua and Geneva isochrones. The problem of the ratio of blue to red supergiants is also addressed.
  • We use HST/ACS observations of the spiral galaxy M51 in F435W, F555W and F814W to select a large sample of star clusters with accurate effective radius measurements in an area covering the complete disc of M51. We present the dataset and study the radius distribution and relations between radius, colour, arm/interarm region, galactocentric distance, mass and age. We select a sample of 7698 (F435W), 6846 (F555W) and 5024 (F814W) slightly resolved clusters and derive their effective radii by fitting the spatial profiles with analytical models convolved with the point spread function. The radii of 1284 clusters are studied in detail. We find cluster radii between 0.5 and ~10 pc, and one exceptionally large cluster candidate with a radius of 21.6 pc. The median radius is 2.1 pc. We find 70 clusters in our sample which have colours consistent with being old GC candidates and we find 6 new "faint fuzzy" clusters in, or projected onto, the disc of M51. The radius distribution can not be fitted with a power law, but a log-normal distribution provides a reasonable fit to the data. This indicates that shortly after the formation of the clusters from a fractal gas, their radii have changed in a non-uniform way. We find an increase in radius with colour as well as a higher fraction of redder clusters in the interarm regions, suggesting that clusters in spiral arms are more compact. We find a correlation between radius and galactocentric distance which is considerably weaker than the observed correlation for old Milky Way GCs. We find weak relations between cluster luminosity and radius, but we do not observe a correlation between cluster mass and radius.
  • A detailed imaging analysis of the globular cluster (GC) system of the Sombrero galaxy (NGC 4594) has been accomplished using a six-image mosaic from the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. The quality of the data is such that contamination by foreground stars and background galaxies is negligible for all but the faintest 5% of the GC luminosity function (GCLF). This enables the study of an effectively pure sample of 659 GCs until ~2 mags fainter than the turnover magnitude, which occurs at M_V=-7.60+/-0.06 for an assumed m-M=29.77. Two GC metallicity subpopulations are easily distinguishable, with the metal-poor subpopulation exhibiting a smaller intrinsic dispersion in color compared to the metal-rich subpopulation. Three new discoveries include: (1) A metal-poor GC color-magnitude trend. (2) Confirmation that the metal-rich GCs are ~17% smaller than the metal-poor ones for small projected galactocentric radii (less than ~2 arcmin). However, the median half-light radii of the two subpopulations become identical at ~3 arcmin from the center. This is most easily explained if the size difference is the result of projection effects. (3) The brightest (M_V < -9.0) members of the GC system show a size-magnitude upturn where the average GC size increases with increasing luminosity. Evidence is presented that supports an intrinsic origin for this feature rather than a being result from accreted dwarf elliptical nuclei. In addition, the metal-rich GCs show a shallower positive size-magnitude trend, similar to what is found in previous studies of young star clusters.
  • We exploit the superb resolution of the new HST/ACS mosaic image of M51 to select a large sample of young (< 1 Gyr) star clusters in the spiral disk, based on their sizes. The image covers the entire spiral disk in B, V, I and H_alpha, at a resolution of 2 pc per pixel. The surface density distribution of 4357 resolved clusters shows that the clusters are more correlated with clouds than with stars, and we find a hint of enhanced cluster formation at the corotation radius. The radius distribution of a sample of 769 clusters with more accurate radii suggests that young star clusters have a preferred effective radius of ~3 pc, which is similar to the preferred radius of the much older GCs. However, in contrast to the GCs, the young clusters in M51 do not show a relation between radius and galactocentric distance. This means that the clusters did not form in tidal equilibrium with their host galaxy, nor that their radius is related to the ambient pressure.
  • Using the NIRSPEC spectrograph at Keck II, we have obtained H and K-band echelle spectra for a young (10-15 Myr), luminous (MV=-13.2) super-star cluster in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 6946. From spectral synthesis and equivalent width measurements we obtain for the first time accurate abundances and abundance patterns in an extragalactic super-star cluster. We find [Fe/H]=-0.45+/-0.08 dex, an average alpha-enhancement of +0.22+/-0.1 dex, and a relatively low 12C/13C~ 8+/-2 isotopic ratio. We also measure a velocity dispersion of ~9.1 km/s, in agreement with previous estimates. We conclude that integrated high-dispersion spectroscopy of massive star clusters is a promising alternative to other methods for abundance analysis in extragalactic young stellar populations.
  • The software package aXe provides comprehensive spectral extraction facilities for all the slitless modes of the ACS, covering the Wide Field Channel (WFC) grism, the High Resolution Channel (HRC) grism and prism and the Solar Blind Channel (SBC) prisms. The latest developments to the package apply to all ACS slitless modes leading to improved spectral extraction. Many thousands of spectra may be present on a single deep ACS WFC G800L image such that overlap of spectra is a significant nuisance. Two methods of estimating the contamination of any given spectrum by its near neighbours have been developed: one is based on the catalogue of objects on the direct image; another uses the flux information on multi-filter direct images. An improvement to the extracted spectra can also result from weighted extraction and the Horne optimal extraction algorithm has been implemented in aXe. A demonstrated improvement in signal-to-noise can be achieved. These new features are available in aXe-1.5 with the STSDAS 3.4 release.
  • The Advanced Camera for Surveys is equipped with three prisms in the Solar Blind (SBC) and High Resolution (HRC) Channels, which together cover the 1150 - 3500 A range, albeit at highly non-uniform spectral resolution. We present new wavelength- and flux calibrations of the SBC (PR110L and PR130L) and HRC (PR200L) prisms, based on calibration observations obtained in Cycle 13. The calibration products are available to users via the ST-ECF/aXe web pages, and can be used directly with the aXe package. We discuss our calibration strategy and some caveats specific to slitless prism spectroscopy.
  • The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) enables low resolution slitless spectroscopic imaging in the three channels. The most-used modes are grism imaging with the WFC and the HRC at a resolution of 40 and 24 A/pixel, respectively. In the far UV there are two prisms for the SBC and a prism for the HRC in the near-UV. An overview of the slitless spectroscopic modes of the ACS is presented together with the advantages of slitless spectroscopy from space. The methods and strategies developed to establish and maintain the wavelength and flux calibration for the different channels are outlined. Since many slitless spectra are recorded on one deep exposure, pipeline science quality extraction of spectra is a necessity. To reduce ACS slitless data, the aXe spectral extraction software has been developed at the ST-ECF. aXe was designed to extract large numbers of ACS slitless spectra in an unsupervised way based on an input catalogue derived from a companion direct image. In order to handle dithered slitless spectra, drizzle, well-known in the imaging domain, has been applied. For ACS grism images, the aXedrizzle technique resamples 2D spectra from individual images to deep, rectified images before extracting the 1D spectra. aXe also provides tools for visual assessment of the extracted spectra and examples are presented.
  • Young star clusters with masses well in excess of 100.000 Msun have been observed not only in merger galaxies and large-scale starbursts, but also in fairly normal, undisturbed spiral and irregular galaxies. Here we present virial mass estimates for a sample of 7 such clusters and show that the derived mass-to-light ratios are consistent with "normal" Kroupa-type stellar mass distributions.
  • Star Formation in Clusters (astro-ph/0408201)

    Aug. 11, 2004 astro-ph
    HST is very well tailored for observations of extragalactic star clusters. One obvious reason is HST's high spatial resolution, but equally important is the wavelength range offered by the instruments on board HST, in particular the blue and near-UV coverage which is essential for age-dating young clusters. HST observations have helped establish the ubiquity of young massive clusters (YMCs) in a wide variety of star-forming environments, from dwarf galaxies and spiral disks to nuclear starbursts and mergers. These YMCs have masses and sizes similar to those of old globular clusters (GCs), and the two may be closely related. A large fraction of all stars seem to be born in clusters, but most clusters disrupt rapidly and the stars disperse to become part of the field population. In most cases studied to date the luminosity functions of young cluster systems are well fit by power-laws dN(L)/dL ~ L^-2, and the luminosity of the brightest cluster can (with few exceptions) be predicted from simple sampling statistics. Mass functions have only been constrained in a few cases, but appear to be well approximated by similar power-laws. The absence of any characteristic mass scale for cluster formation suggests that star clusters of all masses form by the same basic process, without any need to invoke special mechanisms for the formation of YMCs. It is possible, however, that special conditions can lead to the formation of a few YMCs in some dwarfs where the mass function is discontinuous. Further studies of mass functions for star clusters of different ages may help test the theoretical prediction that the power-law mass distribution observed in young cluster systems can evolve towards the approximately log-normal distribution seen in old GC systems.