• Z. Ahammed, S. Aiola, J. Alme, T. Alt, W. Amend, A. Andronic, V. Anguelov, H. Appelshäuser, M. Arslandok, R. Averbeck, M. Ball, G.G. Barnaföldi, E. Bartsch, R. Bellwied, G. Bencedi, M. Berger, N. Bialas, P. Bialas, L. Bianchi, S. Biswas, L. Boldizsár, L. Bratrud, P. Braun-Munzinger, M. Bregant, C.L. Britton, E.J. Brucken, H. Caines, A.J. Castro, S. Chattopadhyay, P. Christiansen, L.G. Clonts, T.M. Cormier, S. Das, S. Dash, A. Deisting, S. Dittrich, A.K. Dubey, R. Ehlers, F. Erhardt, N.B. Ezell, L. Fabbietti, U. Frankenfeld, J.J. Gaardhøje, C. Garabatos, P. Gasik, Á. Gera, P. Ghosh, S.K. Ghosh, P. Glässel, O. Grachov, A. Grein, T. Gunji, H. Hamagaki, G. Hamar, J.W. Harris, J. Hehner, E. Hellbär, H. Helstrup, T.E. Hilden, B. Hohlweger, M. Ivanov, M. Jung, D. Just, E. Kangasaho, R. Keidel, B. Ketzer, S.A. Khan, S. Kirsch, T. Klemenz, S. Klewin, A.G. Knospe, M. Kowalski, L. Kumar, R. Lang, R. Langoy, L. Lautner, F. Liebske, J. Lien, C. Lippmann, H.M. Ljunggren, W.J. Llope, S. Mahmood, T. Mahmoud, R. Majka, P. Malzacher, A. Marín, C. Markert, S. Masciocchi, A. Mathis, A. Matyja, M. Meres, D.L. Mihaylov, D. Miskowiec, J. Mitra, T. Mittelstaedt, T. Morhardt, J. Mulligan, R.H. Munzer, K. Münning, M.G. Munhoz, S. Muhuri, H. Murakami, B.K. Nandi, H. Natal da Luz, C. Nattrass, T.K. Nayak, R.A. Negrao De Oliveira, M. Nicassio, B.S. Nielsen, L. Oláh, A. Oskarsson, J. Otwinowski, K. Oyama, G. Paić, R.N. Patra, V. Peskov, M. Pikna, L. Pinsky, M. Planinic, M.G. Poghosyan, N. Poljak, F. Pompei, S.K. Prasad, C.A. Pruneau, J. Putschke, S. Raha, J. Rak, J. Rasson, V. Ratza, K.F. Read, A. Rehman, R. Renfordt, T. Richert, K. Røed, D. Röhrich, T. Rudzki, R. Sahoo, S. Sahoo, P.K. Sahu, J. Saini, B. Schaefer, J. Schambach, S. Scheid, C. Schmidt, H.R. Schmidt, N.V Schmidt, H. Schulte, K. Schweda, I. Selyuzhenkov, N. Sharma, D. Silvermyr, R.N. Singaraju, B. Sitar, N. Smirnov, S.P. Sorensen, F. Sozzi, J. Stachel, E. Stenlund, P. Strmen, I. Szarka, G. Tambave, K. Terasaki, A. Timmins, K. Ullaland, A. Utrobicic, D. Varga, R. Varma, A. Velure, V. Vislavicius, S. Voloshin, B. Voss, D. Vranic, J. Wiechula, S. Winkler, J. Wikne, B. Windelband, C. Zhao
    May 8, 2018 physics.ins-det
    A large Time Projection Chamber is the main device for tracking and charged-particle identification in the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC. After the second long shutdown in 2019/20, the LHC will deliver Pb beams colliding at an interaction rate of about 50 kHz, which is about a factor of 50 above the present readout rate of the TPC. This will result in a significant improvement on the sensitivity to rare probes that are considered key observables to characterize the QCD matter created in such collisions. In order to make full use of this luminosity, the currently used gated Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers will be replaced by continuously operated readout detectors employing Gas Electron Multiplier technology, while retaining the performance in terms of particle identification via the measurement of the specific energy loss by ionization d$E$/d$x$. A full-size readout chamber prototype was assembled in 2014 featuring a stack of four GEM foils as an amplification stage. The d$E$/d$x$ resolution of the prototype, evaluated in a test beam campaign at the CERN PS, complies with both the performance of the currently operated MWPC-based readout chambers and the challenging requirements of the ALICE TPC upgrade program. Detailed simulations of the readout system are able to reproduce the data.
  • A theory is developed for the emission noise at frequency $\nu$ in a quantum dot in the presence of Coulomb interactions and asymmetric couplings to the reservoirs. We give an analytical expression for the noise in terms of the various transmission amplitudes. Including inelastic scattering contribution, it can be seen as the analog of the Meir-Wingreen formula for the current. A physical interpretation is given on the basis of the transmission of one electron-hole pair to the concerned reservoir where it emits an energy after recombination. We then treat the interactions by solving the self-consistent equations of motion for the Green functions. The results for the noise derivative versus $eV$ show a zero value until $eV = h\nu$, followed by a Kondo peak in the Kondo regime, in good agreement with recent measurements in carbon nanotube quantum dots.
  • We investigate the rare baryonic ${\Lambda}_b\rightarrow{\Lambda}l^+ l^-$ decays in a non-universal $Z'$ model, which is one of the well-motivated extensions of the standard model (SM). Considering the effects of $Z'$-mediated flavour-changing neutral currents (FCNCs) we analyse the differential decay rate, forward-backward asymmetries and lepton polarisation asymmetries for the ${\Lambda}_b\rightarrow{\Lambda}l^+ l^-$ decays. We find significant deviations from their SM predictions, which could indicate new physics arising from the $Z'$ gauge boson.
  • The rare radiative decays $ B_s^0\rightarrow l^+ l^-\gamma $ $ (l=\mu,\tau) $ are important probes for testing the flavor sector of the standard model (SM) and possible extensions. We investigate the effects of non-universal $Z'$ boson on the $ B_s^0\rightarrow l^+ l^-\gamma $ decays which can give significant basis to verify the new physics (NP) contributions. The $Z'$ boson gives additional contributions to the Wilson coefficients $ C_9 $ and $ C_{10} $ due to its coupling with leptons and quarks. The coupling parameters of $Z'$ boson are constrained from $ B-\bar{B} $ mixing and different inclusive as well as exclusive decays of \emph{B} meson. We include these contributions to calculate the branching ratios and forward-backward asymmetries $ (A_{FB}) $ for $ B_s^0\rightarrow l^+ l^-\gamma $ $ (l=\mu,\tau) $ decay modes, which segregate new physics (NP) effects. We find that the branching ratios are enhanced by one order from SM results. We also see the variation of $ A_{FB} $ with the coupling parameters which distinguishes between NP effects and SM results.
  • The phenomenon of CP violation in the standard model (SM) framework and the decay dynamics have been established from the data obtained from the B factories and so far we have not seen anything new. Nevertheless, there have been instances of deviations in many measured observables in the flavor sector, as far as the data and predictions are concerned. Here we will mention some deviations obtained in measurements related to lepton universality, as seen from the data, and try to understand their implications. To accommodate the observed data we will consider a leptoquark model, which seems to be one interesting model beyond the SM.
  • We report ferrielectricity in a single-phase crystal, TSCC -- tris-sarcosine calcium chloride [(CH3NHCH2COOH)3CaCl2]. Ferrielectricity is well known in smectic liquid crystals but almost unknown in true crystalline solids. Pulvari reported it in 1960 in mixtures of ferroelectrics and antiferroelectrics, but only at high fields. TSCC exhibits a second-order displacive phase transition near Tc = 130 K that can be lowered to a Quantum Critical Point at zero Kelvin via Br- or I-substitution, and phases predicted to be antiferroelectric at high pressure and low temperatures. Unusually, the size of the primitive unit cell does not increase. We measure hysteresis loops and polarization below T = 64 K and clear Raman evidence for this transition, as well of another transition near 47-50 K. X-ray and neutron studies below Tc = 130K show there is an antiferroelectric displacement out of plane of two sarcosine groups; but these are antiparallel displacements are of different magnitude, leading to a bias voltage that grows with decreasing T. A monoclinic subgroup C2 may be possible at the lowest temperatures (T<64K or T<48K), but no direct evidence exists for a crystal class lower than orthorhombic.
  • The article presents the formulation and a new approach to find analytic solutions for fractional continuously variable order dynamic models viz. Fractional continuously variable order mass-spring damper systems. Here, we use the viscoelastic and viscous-viscoelastic dampers for describing the damping nature of the oscillating systems, where the order of fractional derivative varies continuously. Here, we handle the continuous changing nature of fractional order derivative for dynamic systems, which has not been studied yet. By successive iteration method, here we find the solution of fractional continuously variable order mass-spring damper systems, and then give a close form solution. We then present and discuss the solutions obtained in the cases with continuously variable order of damping for this oscillator with graphical plots.
  • The recent observation of the same-sign dimuon charge asymmetry in the B system by the D0 collaboration has 3.9 sigma deviation from the standard model prediction. However, the recent LHCb data on B-s neutral-meson mixing do not accommodate the D0 collaboration result. In this paper, considering the effect of Z'-mediated flavour-changing neutral currents in the $ B_q^0 - bar B_q^0$ (q = d, s) mixing, the same-sign dimuon charge asymmetry is calculated. We find the same-sign dimuon charge asymmetry is enhanced from its SM prediction and provides signals for new physics beyond the SM
  • In recent years, $B_s$ decays into $tau^+tau^-$ has attracted a lot of attention since it is very sensitive to the structure of standard model (SM) and potential source of new physics beyond SM. In this paper, we study the effect of both Z and -mediated flavor-changing neutral currents on the $B_s$ decays into $tau^+tau^-$. We find the branching ratio of $B_s$ decays into $tau^+tau^-$ is enhanced relative to SM prediction, which would help to explain the recent observed CP-violation from like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry in the B system.
  • In 1861, James Clerk Maxwell unified electricity, magnetism and light. Today physicists are trying to unify everthing else theoretically as well as experimentally with a view to develop a fundamental theory.
  • String theory is the most promising candidate theory for a unified description of all fundamental forces exist in the nature. It provides a mathematical framework that combine quantum theory with Einstein's general theory of relativity. But due to the extremely small size of strings, nobody has been able to detect it directly in the laboratory till today. In this article, we have presented a general introduction to string theory.
  • Time interval between the incident and scattered photon in Raman effect and absorption of photon and emission of electron in photoelectric effect has not been determined till now. This is because there is no such high level instrument discovered till now to detect time interval to such a small level. But this can be calculated theoretically by applying a basic principle of physics like impulse is equal to the change in momentum. Considering the collision between electron and photon as perfect inelastic collision in photoelectric effect, elastic and inelastic collision in Raman effect and elastic collision in plane mirror reflection and the interaction between electron and photon as strong gravitational interaction we calculate the required time interval. During these phenomena there is lattice vibration which can be quantized as phonon particles.
  • We study the effect of both Z and Z'-mediated flavor-changing neutral currents (FCNCs) on the $ lambda_b arrow lambda l^+l^- (l = mu, tau) $ rare decay. We find the branching ratio is reasonably enhanced from its standard model value due to the effect of both Z and Z'-mediated FCNCs, and gives the possibility of new physics beyond the standard model. The contribution of Z'-boson depends upon the precise value of the mass of Z' boson.
  • We study the effect of -mediated flavor-changing neutral current on the decays. The branching ratios of these decays can be enhanced remarkably in the non-universal model. Our estimated branching ratios are enhanced significantly from their standard model (SM) value. For = 1, the branching ratios are very close to the recently observed experimental values and for higher values of branching ratios are more. Our calculated branching ratios and are also enhanced from the SM value as well as the recently observed experimental values. These enhancements of branching ratios from their SM value give the possibility of new physics.
  • $B_q^0-B_^0 bar$ mixing offers a profound probe into the effects of new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this paper, $B_s^0-B_s^0 bar$ and $B_d^0-B_d^0 bar$ mass differences are considered taking the effect of both Z-and Z' -mediated flavour-changing neutral currents in the $B_q^0-B_q^0 bar$ mixing (q = d, s). Our estimated mass of Z' boson is accessible at the experiments LHC and B-factories in near future.
  • Dichalcogenides with the common formula MX2 are layered materials with electrical properties that range from semiconducting to superconducting. Here, we describe optimal imaging conditions for optical detection of ultrathin, two-dimensional dichalcogenide nanocrystals containing single, double and triple layers of MoS2, WSe2 and NbSe2. A simple optical model is used to calculate the contrast for nanolayers deposited on wafers with varying thickness of SiO2. The model is extended for imaging using the green channel of a video camera. Using AFM and optical imaging we confirm that single layers of MoS2, WSe2 and NbSe2 can be detected on 90nm and 270 nm SiO2 using optical means. By measuring contrast under broad-band green illumination we are also able to distinguish between nanostructures containing single, mono and triple layers of MoS2, WSe2 and NbSe2.
  • Discontinuous magnetic multilayers [CoFe/Al2O3] are studied by use of magnetometry, susceptometry and numeric simulations. Soft ferromagnetic Co80Fe20 nanoparticles are embedded in a diamagnetic insulating a-Al2O3 matrix and can be considered as homogeneously magnetized superspins exhibiting randomness of size (viz. moment), position and anisotropy. Lacking intra-particle core-surface ordering, generic freezing processes into collective states rather than individual particle blocking are encountered. With increasing particle density one observes first superspin glass and then superferromagnetic domain state behavior. The phase diagram resembles that of a dilute disordered ferromagnet. Criteria for the identification of the individual phases are given.
  • We report on electrical spin injection measurements on MWNTs . We use a ferromagnetic alloy Pd$_{1-x}$Ni$_{x}$ with x $\approx$ 0.7 which allows to obtain devices with resistances as low as 5.6 $k\Omega$ at 300 $K$. The yield of device resistances below 100 $k\Omega$, at 300 $K$, is around 50%. We measure at 2 $K$ a hysteretic magneto-resistance due to the magnetization reversal of the ferromagnetic leads. The relative difference between the resistance in the antiparallel (AP) orientation and the parallel (P) orientation is about 2%.
  • We performed an overview of the inner shell excitation phenomena in the study of electron recombination with multiply charged complex ions such as Au$^{q+}$ (q=49-52) and Pb$^{53+}$. It is found the the inner shell excitations play a significant role in the low energy electron recombination. Taking into account these inner shell excitations we have calculated the energy avaraged capture cross sections. The dielectronic rate coefficients are found to be in good agreement with the experiment. We show that the contribution from the inner-shell enhances the recombinmation rate by an order of magitude. We also made an attempt to identify the resonaces observed by the experiment in Au$^{50+}$ and Pb$^{53+}$. A prediction is made for the rate enhancement in Au$^{52+}$ in which we found the configuration mixing between the doubly and the complex multiply excited states. Analyzing the statistics of eigenstate components we estimated the spreading width is about 0.85 a.u. which defines the energy range within which strong mixing takes place.
  • We report the observation of thermally driven mechanical vibrations of suspended doubly clamped carbon nanotubes, grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Several experimental procedures are used to suspend carbon nanotubes. The vibration is observed as a blurring in images taken with a scanning electron microscope. The measured vibration amplitudes are compared with a model based on linear continuum mechanics.