• We present the Arizona CDFS Environment Survey (ACES), a recently-completed spectroscopic redshift survey of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) conducted using IMACS on the Magellan-Baade telescope. In total, the survey targeted 7277 unique sources down to a limiting magnitude of R = 24.1, yielding 5080 secure redshifts across the ~30' x 30' extended CDFS region. The ACES dataset delivers a significant increase to both the spatial coverage and the sampling density of the spectroscopic observations in the field. Combined with previously-published, spectroscopic redshifts, ACES now creates a highly-complete survey of the galaxy population at R < 23, enabling the local galaxy density (or environment) on relatively small scales (~1 Mpc) to be measured at z < 1 in one of the most heavily-studied and data-rich fields in the sky. Here, we describe the motivation, design, and implementation of the survey and present a preliminary redshift and environment catalog. In addition, we utilize the ACES spectroscopic redshift catalog to assess the quality of photometric redshifts from both the COMBO-17 and MUSYC imaging surveys of the CDFS.
  • We have used deep GALEX observations at the infall region of the Coma cluster to measure the faintest UV luminosity functions (LFs) presented for a rich galaxy cluster thus far. The Coma UV LFs are measured to M_UV = -10.5 in the GALEX FUV and NUV bands, or 3.5 mag fainter than previous studies, and reach the dwarf early-type galaxy population in Coma for the first time. The Schechter faint-end slopes (alpha = -1.39 in both GALEX bands) are shallower than reported in previous Coma UV LF studies owing to a flatter LF at faint magnitudes. A Gaussian-plus-Schechter model provides a slightly better parametrization of the UV LFs resulting in a faint-end slope of ~ -1.15 in both GALEX bands. The two-component model gives faint-end slopes shallower than -1 (a turnover) for the LFs constructed separately for passive and star forming galaxies. The UV LFs for star forming galaxies show a turnover at M_UV ~ -14 owing to a deficit of dwarf star forming galaxies in Coma with stellar masses below M*=10^8 Msun. A similar turnover is identified in recent UV LFs measured for the Virgo cluster suggesting this may be a common feature of local galaxy clusters, whereas the field UV LFs continue to rise at faint magnitudes. We did not identify an excess of passive galaxies as would be expected if the missing dwarf star forming galaxies were quenched inside the cluster. In fact, the LFs for both dwarf passive and star forming galaxies show the same turnover at faint magnitudes. We discuss the possible origin of the missing dwarf star forming galaxies in Coma and their expected properties based on comparisons to local field galaxies.
  • We describe the effect of AGN light on host galaxy optical and UV-optical colours, as determined from X-ray-selected AGN host galaxies at z~1, and compare the AGN host galaxy colours to those of a control sample matched to the AGN sample in both redshift and stellar mass. We identify as X-ray-selected AGNs 8.7 +4/-3 per cent of the red-sequence control galaxies, 9.8 +/-3 per cent of the blue-cloud control galaxies, and 14.7 +4/-3 per cent of the green-valley control galaxies. The nuclear colours of AGN hosts are generally bluer than their outer colours, while the control galaxies exhibit redder nuclei. AGNs in blue-cloud host galaxies experience less X-ray obscuration, while AGNs in red-sequence hosts have more, which is the reverse of what is expected from general considerations of the interstellar medium. Outer and integrated colours of AGN hosts generally agree with the control galaxies, regardless of X-ray obscuration, but the nuclear colours of unobscured AGNs are typically much bluer, especially for X-ray luminous objects. Visible point sources are seen in many of these, indicating that the nuclear colours have been contaminated by AGN light and that obscuration of the X-ray radiation and visible light are therefore highly correlated. Red AGN hosts are typically slightly bluer than red-sequence control galaxies, which suggests that their stellar populations are slightly younger. We compare these colour data to current models of AGN formation. The unexpected trend of less X-ray obscuration in blue-cloud galaxies and more in red-sequence galaxies is problematic for all AGN feedback models, in which gas and dust is thought to be removed as star formation shuts down. [See paper for full abstract.]
  • We assess the effects of simulated active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on the colour and morphology measurements of their host galaxies. To test the morphology measurements, we select a sample of galaxies not known to host AGNs and add a series of point sources scaled to represent specified fractions of the observed V band light detected from the resulting systems; we then compare morphology measurements of the simulated systems to measurements of the original galaxies. AGN contributions >20 per cent bias most of the morphology measurements tested, though the extent of the apparent bias depends on the morphological characteristics of the original galaxies. We test colour measurements by adding to non-AGN galaxy spectra a quasar spectrum scaled to contribute specified fractions of the rest-frame B band light detected from the resulting systems. A quasar fraction of 5 per cent can move the NUV-r colour of an elliptical galaxy from the UV-optical red sequence to the green valley, and 20 per cent can move it into the blue cloud. Combining the colour and morphology results, we find that a galaxy/AGN system with an AGN contribution >20 per cent may appear bluer and more bulge-dominated than the underlying galaxy. We conclude that (1) bulge-dominated, E/S0/Sa, and early-type morphology classifications are accurate for red AGN host galaxies and may be accurate for blue host galaxies, unless the AGN manifests itself as a well-defined point source; and (2) although highly unobscured AGNs, such as the quasar used for our experiments, can significantly bias the measured colours of AGN host galaxies, it is possible to identify such systems by examining optical images of the hosts for the presence of a point source and/or measuring the level of nuclear obscuration.
  • As the closest example of a galactic nucleus, the Galactic center presents an exquisite laboratory for learning about supermassive black holes (SMBH) and their environs. Detailed studies of stellar dynamics deep in the potential well of a galaxy, with exisiting and future large ground-based telescopes, offer several exciting directions in the coming decade. First, it will be possible to obtain precision measurements of the Galaxy's central potential, providing both a unique test of General Relativity (GR) and a detection of the extended dark matter distribution that is predicted to exist around the SMBH. Tests of gravity have not previously been possible on the mass scale of a SMBH. Similarly, only upper limits on the extended matter distribution on small scales currently exist; detection of dark matter on these scales is an important test of Lambda-CDM and the detection of stellar remnants would reveal a population that may dominate the stellar dynamics on the smallest scales. Second, our detailed view of the SMBH and its local gas and stellar environment provides insight into how SMBHs at the centers of galaxies form, grow and interact with their environs as well as on the exotic processes at work in the densest stellar clusters in the Universe. The key questions, still unanswered, of when and how SMBHs formed in the early universe, and the myriad ways in which feedback from SMBHs can affect structure formation, can be informed by directly observing the physical processes operating at the SMBH.
  • We report new precision measurements of the properties of our Galaxy's supermassive black hole. Based on astrometric (1995-2007) and radial velocity (2000-2007) measurements from the W. M. Keck 10-meter telescopes, a fully unconstrained Keplerian orbit for the short period star S0-2 provides values for Ro of 8.0+-0.6 kpc, M_bh of 4.1+-0.6x10^6 Mo, and the black hole's radial velocity, which is consistent with zero with 30 km/s uncertainty. If the black hole is assumed to be at rest with respect to the Galaxy, we can further constrain the fit and obtain Ro = 8.4+-0.4 kpc and M_bh = 4.5+-0.4x10^6 Mo. More complex models constrain the extended dark mass distribution to be less than 3-4x10^5 Mo within 0.01 pc, ~100x higher than predictions from stellar and stellar remnant models. For all models, we identify transient astrometric shifts from source confusion and the assumptions regarding the black hole's radial motion as previously unrecognized limitations on orbital accuracy and the usefulness of fainter stars. Future astrometric and RV observations will remedy these effects. Our estimates of Ro and the Galaxy's local rotation speed, which it is derived from combining Ro with the apparent proper motion of Sgr A*, (theta0 = 229+-18 km/s), are compatible with measurements made using other methods. The increased black hole mass found in this study, compared to that determined using projected mass estimators, implies a longer period for the innermost stable orbit, longer resonant relaxation timescales for stars in the vicinity of the black hole and a better agreement with the M_bh-sigma relation.
  • We describe AEGIS20 - a radio survey of the Extended Groth Strip (EGS) conducted with the Very Large Array (VLA) at 1.4GHz. The resulting catalog contains 1,123 emitters and is sensitive to ultraluminous starbursts to z<=1.3, well matched to the redshift range of the DEEP2 spectroscopic survey in this region. We use stacking techniques to explore the uJy-level emission from a variety of galaxy populations selected via conventional criteria - Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs), distant red galaxies (DRGs), UV-selected galaxies and extremely red objects (EROs) - determining their properties as a function of color, magnitude and redshift and their extinction-free contributions to the history of star formation. We confirm the familiar pattern that the star-formation-rate (SFR) density, SFRD, rises by at least ~5x from z=0-1, although we note highly discrepant UV- and radio-based SFR estimates. Our radio-based SFRs become more difficult to interpret at z>1 where correcting for contamination by radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) comes at the price of rejecting luminous starbursts. Whilst stacking radio images is a useful technique, accurate radio-based SFRs for z>>1 galaxies require precise redshifts and extraordinarily high-fidelity radio data to identify and remove accretion-related emission.
  • As part of the "All Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey" (AEGIS), we describe the panchromatic characterization of an X-ray luminous active galactic nucleus (AGN) in a merging galaxy at z=1.15. This object is detected at infrared (8mic, 24mic, 70mic, 160mic), submillimeter (850mic) and radio wavelengths, from which we derive a bolometric luminosity L_bol ~ 9x10^12 Lsol. We find that the AGN clearly dominates the hot dust emission below 40mic but its total energetic power inferred from the hard X-rays is substantially less than the bolometric output of the system. About 50% of the infrared luminosity is indeed produced by a cold dust component that probably originates from enshrouded star formation in the host galaxy. In the context of a coeval growth of stellar bulges and massive black holes, this source might represent a ``transition'' object sharing properties with both quasars and luminous starbursts. Study of such composite galaxies will help address how the star formation and disk-accretion phenomena may have regulated each other at high redshift and how this coordination may have participated to the build-up of the relationship observed locally between the masses of black holes and stellar spheroids.
  • We study 87 Extremely Red Objects (EROs), selected both to have color redder than R-[3.6] = 4.0, and to have confirmed spectroscopic redshifts. Together, these two constraints result in this sample populating a fairly narrow redshift range at 0.76 < z < 1.42. The key new ingredient included here is deep Spitzer Space Telescope InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) data. Based on [3.6]-[8.0] color, we demonstrate that it is possible to classify EROs into early-type, dusty starburst, or power-law (AGN) types. We present ultraviolet to mid-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images, both of which support our simple IRAC color classification.
  • In this the first of a series of Letters, we present a description of the panchromatic data sets that have been acquired in the Extended Groth Strip region of the sky. Our survey, the All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS), is intended to study the physical properties and evolutionary processes of galaxies at z ~ 1. It includes the following deep, wide-field imaging data sets: Chandra/ACIS X-ray (0.5 - 10 keV), GALEX ultraviolet (1200 - 2500 Angstrom), CFHT/MegaCam Legacy Survey optical (3600 - 9000 Angstroms), CFHT/CFH12K optical (4500 - 9000 Angstroms), Hubble Space Telescope/ACS optical (4400 - 8500 Angstroms), Palomar/WIRC near-infrared (1.2 - 2.2 microns), Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared (3.6 - 8.0 microns), Spitzer/MIPS far-infrared (24 - 70 microns), and VLA radio continuum (6 - 20 cm). In addition, this region of the sky has been targeted for extensive spectroscopy using the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II 10 m telescope. Our survey is compared to other large multiwavelength surveys in terms of depth and sky coverage.
  • We combine data from SDSS and the GALEX and Spitzer observatories to create a sample of galaxies observed homogeneously from the UV to the Far-IR. This sample, consisting of ~460 galaxies observed spectroscopically by SDSS provides a multiwavelength (0.15-24 micron) view of obscured and unobscured star formation in nearby (z<0.3) galaxies with SFRs ranging from 0.01 to 100 M_solar/yr. We calculate a robust dust measure from the infrared to UV ratio (IRX) and explore the influence of star formation history (SFH) on the dust-UV color relation (i.e. the IRX-beta relation). We find that the UV colors of galaxies are only weakly dependent on their SFH as measured by the 4000A break. However, we find that the contributions of dust and SFH are distinguishable when colors at widely separated wavelengths (e.g. 0.23-3.6 micron) are introduced. We show this explicitly by recasting the IRX-beta relation as a more general IRX-SFH-color relation, which we examine in different projections. We also determine simple fits to this relation.
  • We present ultraviolet photometry for a sample of morphologically early-type galaxies selected by matching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 1 with the GALEX Medium and All-sky Imaging Surveys. We obtain a working sample of 1032 early-type galaxies with GALEX FUV detections, SDSS spectroscopy, and $z<0.2$. Using the SDSS spectra to identify galaxies with even weak star formation or evidence of AGN, and further removing galaxies with any evidence of non early-type morphology, we derive a final sample of 172 red quiescent early-type galaxies. We find that the $FUV-r$ color has a full range of 5 mag. Plotting against the $FUV-r$ color the metallicity sensitive Lick $\rm Mg_2$ and D4000 indices, and the stellar velocity dispersion, we find no correlation between our measurement of UV rising flux, and any parameter sensitive to metallicity.
  • We present new proper motion measurements and simultaneous orbital solutions for three newly identified (S0-16, S0-19, and S0-20) and four previously known (S0-1, S0-2, S0-4, and S0-5) stars at the Galactic Center. This analysis pinpoints the Galaxy's central dark mass to within +-1 milli-arcsec and, for the first time from orbital dynamics, limits its proper motion to 1.5+-0.5 mas/y, which is consistent with our derivation of the position of Sgr A* in the infrared reference frame (+-10 mas). The estimated central dark mass from orbital motions is 3.7 (+-0.2) x 10^6 (Ro/8kpc)^3 Mo; this is a more direct measure of mass than those obtained from velocity dispersion measurements, which are as much as a factor of two smaller. The smallest closest approach is achieved by S0-16, which confines the mass to within a radius of a mere 45 AU and increases the inferred dark mass density by four orders of magnitude compared to earlier analyses based on velocity and acceleration vectors, making the Milky Way the strongest existing case by far for a supermassive black hole at the center of any normal type galaxy. The stellar orbital properties suggest that the distributions of eccentricities and angular momentum vector and apoapse directions are consistent with those of an isotropic system. Therefore many of the mechanisms proposed for the formation of young stars in the vicinity of a supermassive black hole, such as formation from a pre-existing disk, are unlikely solutions for the Sgr A* cluster stars. Unfortunately, all existing alternative theories are also somewhat problematic. Understanding the apparent youth of stars in the Sgr A* cluster, as well as the more distant He I emission line stars, has now become one of the major outstanding issues in the study of the Galactic Center.
  • With the advent of adaptive optics on the W. M. Keck 10 m telescope, two significant steps forward have been taken in building the case for a supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way and understanding the black hole's effect on its environment. Using adaptive optics and speckle imaging to study the motions of stars in the plane of sky with +-~2 mas precision over the past 7 years, we have obtained the first simultaneous orbital solution for multiple stars. Among the included stars, three are newly identified (S0-16, S0-19, S0-20). The most dramatic orbit is that of the newly identified star S0-16, which passed a mere 60 AU from the central dark mass at a velocity of 9,000 km/s in 1999. The orbital analysis results in a new central dark mass estimate of 3.6(+-0.4)x10^6(D/8kpc)^3 Mo. This dramatically strengthens the case for a black hole at the center of our Galaxy, by confining the dark matter to within a radius of 0.0003 pc or 1,000 Rsh and thereby increasing the inferred dark mass density by four orders of magnitude compared to earlier estimates. With the introduction of an adaptive-optics-fed spectrometer, we have obtained the spectra of these high-velocity stars, which suggest that they are massive (~15 Mo), young (<10 Myr) main sequence stars. This presents a major challenge to star formation theories, given the strong tidal forces that prevail over all distances reached by these stars in their current orbits and the difficulty in migrating these stars inward during their lifetime from further out where tidal forces should no longer preclude star formation.
  • We have obtained the first detection of spectral absorption lines in one of the high-velocity stars in the vicinity of the Galaxy's central supermassive black hole. Both Brgamma (2.1661 micron) and He I (2.1126 micron) are seen in absorption in S0-2 with equivalent widths (2.8+-0.3 Ang & 1.7+-0.4 Ang) and an inferred stellar rotational velocity (220+-40 km/s) that are consistent with that of an O8-B0 dwarf, which suggests that it is a massive (~15 Msun), young (<10 Myr) main sequence star. This presents a major challenge to star formation theories, given the strong tidal forces that prevail over all distances reached by S0-2 in its current orbit (130 - 1900 AU) and the difficulty in migrating this star inward during its lifetime from further out where tidal forces should no longer preclude star formation. The radial velocity measurements (-510+-40 km/s) and our reported proper motions for S0-2 strongly constrain its orbit, providing a direct measure of the black hole mass of 4.1(+-0.6)x10^6(Ro/8kpc)^3 Msun. The Keplerian orbit parameters have uncertainities that are reduced by a factor of 2-3 compared to previously reported values and include, for the first time, an independent solution for the dynamical center; this location, while consistent with the nominal infrared position of Sgr A*, is localized to a factor of 5 more precisely (+-2 milli-arcsec). Furthermore, the ambiguity in the inclination of the orbit is resolved with the addition of the radial velocity measurement, indicating that the star is behind the black hole at the time of closest approach and counter-revolving against the Galaxy. With further radial velocity measurements in the next few years, the orbit of S0-2 will provide the most robust estimate of the distance to the Galactic Center.
  • We describe the discovery circumstances and photometric properties of 2000 EB173, now one of the brightest trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) with opposition magnitude m_R=18.9 and also one of the largest Plutinos, found with the drift-scanning camera of the QUEST Collaboration, attached to the 1-m Schmidt telescope of the National Observatory of Venezuela. We measure B-V = 0.99 +/- 0.14 and V-R = 0.57 +/- 0.05, a red color observed for many fainter TNOs. At our magnitude limit m_R = 20.1 +/- 0.20, our single detection reveals a sky density of 0.015 (+0.034, -0.012) TNOs per deg^2 (the error bars are 68% confidence limits), consistent with fainter surveys showing a cumulative number proportional to 10^0.5m_R. Assuming an inclination distribution of TNOs with FWHM exceeding 30 deg, it is likely that one hundred to several hundred objects brighter than m_R=20.1 remain to be discovered.