• Symmetries play an important role in modern theories of gravity. The strong equivalence principle (SEP) constitutes a collection of gravitational symmetries which are all implemented by general relativity. Alternative theories, however, are generally expected to violate some aspects of SEP. We test three aspects of SEP using observed change rates in the orbital period and eccentricity of binary pulsar J1713+0747: 1. the gravitational constant's constancy as part of locational invariance of gravitation; 2. the post-Newtonian parameter $\hat{\alpha}_3$ in gravitational Lorentz invariance; 3. the universality of free fall (UFF) for strongly self-gravitating bodies. Based on the pulsar timing result of the combined dataset from the North American Nanohertz Gravitational Observatory (NANOGrav) and the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA), we find $\dot{G}/G = (-0.1 \pm 0.9) \times 10^{-12}\,{\rm yr}^{-1}$, which is weaker than Solar system limits, but applies for strongly self-gravitating objects. Furthermore, we obtain the constraints $|\Delta|< 0.002$ for the UFF test and $-3\times10^{-20} < \hat{\alpha}_3 < 4\times10^{-20}$ at 95% confidence. These are the first direct UFF and $\hat{\alpha}_3$ tests based on pulsar binaries, and they overcome various limitations of previous tests.
  • We have observed a complex and continuous change in the integrated pulse profile of PSR B2217+47, manifested as additional components trailing the main peak. These transient components are detected over 6 years at $150$ MHz using the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR), but they are not seen in contemporaneous Lovell observations at $1.5$ GHz. We argue that propagation effects in the ionized interstellar medium (IISM) are the most likely cause. The putative structures in the IISM causing the profile variation are roughly half-way between the pulsar and the Earth and have transverse radii $R \sim 30$ AU. We consider different models for the structures. Under the assumption of spherical symmetry, their implied average electron density is $\overline{n}_e \sim 100$ cm$^{-3}$. Since PSR B2217+47 is more than an order of magnitude brighter than the average pulsar population visible to LOFAR, similar profile variations would not have been identified in most pulsars, suggesting that subtle profile variations in low-frequency profiles might be more common than we have observed to date. Systematic studies of these variations at low frequencies can provide a new tool to investigate the proprieties of the IISM and the limits to the precision of pulsar timing.
  • Using LOFAR, we have performed a very-low-frequency (115-155 MHz) radio survey for millisecond pulsars (MSPs). The survey targeted 52 unidentified Fermi $\gamma$-ray sources. Employing a combination of coherent and incoherent dedispersion, we have mitigated the dispersive effects of the interstellar medium while maintaining sensitivity to fast-spinning pulsars. Toward 3FGL J1553.1+5437 we have found PSR J1552+5437, the first MSP to be discovered (through its pulsations) at a radio frequency $<$ 200 MHz. PSR J1552+5437 is an isolated MSP with a 2.43 ms spin period and a dispersion measure of 22.9 pc cm$^{-3}$. The pulsar has a very steep radio spectral index ($\alpha < -$2.8 $\pm$ 0.4). We obtain a phase-connected timing solution combining the 0.74 years of radio observations with $\gamma$-ray photon arrival times covering 7.5 years of Fermi observations. We find that the radio and $\gamma$-ray pulse profiles of PSR J1552+5437 appear to be nearly aligned. The very steep spectrum of PSR J1552+5437, along with other recent discoveries, hints at a population of radio MSPs that have been missed in surveys using higher observing frequencies. Detecting such steep spectrum sources is important for mapping the population of MSPs down to the shortest spin periods, understanding their emission in comparison to slow pulsars, and quantifying the prospects for future surveys with low-frequency radio telescopes like SKA-Low and its precursors.
  • We report the discovery of PSR J0952$-$0607, a 707-Hz binary millisecond pulsar which is now the fastest-spinning neutron star known in the Galactic field (i.e., outside of a globular cluster). PSR J0952$-$0607 was found using LOFAR at a central observing frequency of 135 MHz, well below the 300 MHz to 3 GHz frequencies typically used in pulsar searches. The discovery is part of an ongoing LOFAR survey targeting unassociated Fermi Large Area Telescope $\gamma$-ray sources. PSR J0952$-$0607 is in a 6.42-hr orbit around a very low-mass companion ($M_\mathrm{c}\gtrsim0.02$ M$_\odot$) and we identify a strongly variable optical source, modulated at the orbital period of the pulsar, as the binary companion. The light curve of the companion varies by 1.6 mag from $r^\prime=22.2$ at maximum to $r^\prime>23.8$, indicating that it is irradiated by the pulsar wind. Swift observations place a 3-$\sigma$ upper limit on the $0.3-10$ keV X-ray luminosity of $L_X < 1.1 \times 10^{31}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (using the 0.97 kpc distance inferred from the dispersion measure). Though no eclipses of the radio pulsar are observed, the properties of the system classify it as a black widow binary. The radio pulsed spectrum of PSR J0952$-$0607, as determined through flux density measurements at 150 and 350 MHz, is extremely steep with $\alpha\sim-3$ (where $S \propto \nu^{\alpha}$). We discuss the growing evidence that the fastest-spinning radio pulsars have exceptionally steep radio spectra, as well as the prospects for finding more sources like PSR J0952$-$0607.
  • The Large European Array for Pulsars combines Europe's largest radio telescopes to form a tied-array telescope that provides high signal-to-noise observations of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with the objective to increase the sensitivity of detecting low-frequency gravitational waves. As part of this endeavor we have developed a software correlator and beamformer which enables the formation of a tied-array beam from the raw voltages from each of telescopes. We explain the concepts and techniques involved in the process of adding the raw voltages coherently. We further present the software processing pipeline that is specifically designed to deal with data from widely spaced, inhomogeneous radio telescopes and describe the steps involved in preparing, correlating and creating the tied-array beam. This includes polarization calibration, bandpass correction, frequency dependent phase correction, interference mitigation and pulsar gating. A link is provided where the software can be obtained.
  • Single pulses preserve information about the pulsar radio emission and propagation in the pulsar magnetosphere, and understanding the behaviour of their variability is essential for estimating the fundamental limit on the achievable pulsar timing precision. Here we report the findings of our analysis of single pulses from PSR J1713+0747 with data collected by the Large European Array for Pulsars (LEAP). We present statistical studies of the pulse properties that include distributions of their energy, phase and width. Two modes of systematic sub-pulse drifting have been detected, with a periodicity of 7 and 3 pulse periods. The two modes appear at different ranges of pulse longitude but overlap under the main peak of the integrated profile. No evidence for pulse micro-structure is seen with a time resolution down to 140 ns. In addition, we show that the fractional polarisation of single pulses increases with their pulse peak flux density. By mapping the probability density of linear polarisation position angle with pulse longitude, we reveal the existence of two orthogonal polarisation modes. Finally, we find that the resulting phase jitter of integrated profiles caused by single pulse variability can be described by a Gaussian probability distribution only when at least 100 pulses are used for integration. Pulses of different flux densities and widths contribute approximately equally to the phase jitter, and no improvement on timing precision is achieved by using a sub-set of pulses with a specific range of flux density or width.
  • A background of nanohertz gravitational waves from supermassive black hole binaries could soon be detected by pulsar timing arrays, which measure the times-of-arrival of radio pulses from millisecond pulsars with very high precision. The European Pulsar Timing Array uses five large European radio telescopes to monitor high-precision millisecond pulsars, imposing in this way strong constraints on a gravitational wave background. To achieve the necessary precision needed to detect gravitational waves, the Large European Array for Pulsars (LEAP) performs simultaneous observations of pulsars with all five telescopes, which allows us to coherently add the radio pulses, maximize the signal-to-noise of pulsar signals and increase the precision of times-of-arrival. We report on the progress made and results obtained by the LEAP collaboration, and in particular on the addition of the Sardinia Radio Telescope to the LEAP observations during its scientific validation phase. In addition, we discuss how LEAP can be used to monitor strong-gravity systems such as double neutron star systems and impose strong constraints on post-keplerian parameters.
  • We present first results from a LOFAR census of non-recycled pulsars. The census includes almost all such pulsars known (194 sources) at declinations ${\rm Dec}> 8^\circ$ and Galactic latitudes $|{\rm Gb}| > 3^\circ$, regardless of their expected flux densities and scattering times. Each pulsar was observed for $\geq 20$ minutes in the contiguous frequency range of 110--188 MHz. Full-Stokes data were recorded. We present the dispersion measures, flux densities, and calibrated total intensity profiles for the 158 pulsars detected in the sample. The median uncertainty in census dispersion measures ($1.5 \times 10^{-3}$ pc cm$^{-3}$) is ten times smaller, on average, than in the ATNF pulsar catalogue. We combined census flux densities with those in the literature and fitted the resulting broadband spectra with single or broken power-law functions. For 48 census pulsars such fits are being published for the first time. Typically, the choice between single and broken power-laws, as well as the location of the spectral break, were highly influenced by the spectral coverage of the available flux density measurements. In particular, the inclusion of measurements below 100 MHz appears essential for investigating the low-frequency turnover in the spectra for most of the census pulsars. For several pulsars, we compared the spectral indices from different works and found the typical spread of values to be within 0.5--1.5, suggesting a prevailing underestimation of spectral index errors in the literature. The census observations yielded some unexpected individual source results, as we describe in the paper. Lastly, we will provide this unique sample of wide-band, low-frequency pulse profiles via the European Pulsar Network Database.
  • We report on 22 yrs of radio timing observations of the millisecond pulsar J1024$-$0719 by the telescopes participating in the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA). These observations reveal a significant second derivative of the pulsar spin frequency and confirm the discrepancy between the parallax and Shklovskii distances that has been reported earlier. We also present optical astrometry, photometry and spectroscopy of 2MASS J10243869$-$0719190. We find that it is a low-metallicity main-sequence star (K7V spectral type, $\mathrm{[M/H]}=-1.0$, $T_\mathrm{eff}=4050\pm50$ K) and that its position, proper motion and distance are consistent with those of PSR J1024$-$0719. We conclude that PSR J1024$-$0719 and 2MASS J10243869$-$0719190 form a common proper motion pair and are gravitationally bound. The gravitational interaction between the main-sequence star and the pulsar accounts for the spin frequency derivatives, which in turn resolves the distance discrepancy. Our observations suggest that the pulsar and main-sequence star are in an extremely wide ($P_\mathrm{b}>200$ yr) orbit. Combining the radial velocity of the companion and proper motion of the pulsar, we find that the binary system has a high spatial velocity of $384\pm45$ km s$^{-1}$ with respect to the local standard of rest and has a Galactic orbit consistent with halo objects. Since the observed main-sequence companion star cannot have recycled the pulsar to millisecond spin periods, an exotic formation scenario is required. We demonstrate that this extremely wide-orbit binary could have evolved from a triple system that underwent an asymmetric supernova explosion, though find that significant fine-tuning during the explosion is required. Finally, we discuss the implications of the long period orbit on the timing stability of PSR J1024$-$0719 in light of its inclusion in pulsar timing arrays.
  • We report on the high-precision timing of 42 radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) observed by the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA). This EPTA Data Release 1.0 extends up to mid-2014 and baselines range from 7-18 years. It forms the basis for the stochastic gravitational-wave background, anisotropic background, and continuous-wave limits recently presented by the EPTA elsewhere. The Bayesian timing analysis performed with TempoNest yields the detection of several new parameters: seven parallaxes, nine proper motions and, in the case of six binary pulsars, an apparent change of the semi-major axis. We find the NE2001 Galactic electron density model to be a better match to our parallax distances (after correction from the Lutz-Kelker bias) than the M2 and M3 models by Schnitzeler (2012). However, we measure an average uncertainty of 80\% (fractional) for NE2001, three times larger than what is typically assumed in the literature. We revisit the transverse velocity distribution for a set of 19 isolated and 57 binary MSPs and find no statistical difference between these two populations. We detect Shapiro delay in the timing residuals of PSRs J1600$-$3053 and J1918$-$0642, implying pulsar and companion masses $m_p=1.22_{-0.35}^{+0.5} \text{M}_{\odot}$, $m_c = 0.21_{-0.04}^{+0.06} \text{M}_{\odot }$ and $m_p=1.25_{-0.4}^{+0.6} \text{M}_{\odot}$, $m_c = 0.23_{-0.05}^{+0.07} \text{M}_{\odot }$, respectively. Finally, we use the measurement of the orbital period derivative to set a stringent constraint on the distance to PSRs J1012$+$5307 and J1909$-$3744, and set limits on the longitude of ascending node through the search of the annual-orbital parallax for PSRs J1600$-$3053 and J1909$-$3744.
  • The sensitivity of Pulsar Timing Arrays to gravitational waves depends on the noise present in the individual pulsar timing data. Noise may be either intrinsic or extrinsic to the pulsar. Intrinsic sources of noise will include rotational instabilities, for example. Extrinsic sources of noise include contributions from physical processes which are not sufficiently well modelled, for example, dispersion and scattering effects, analysis errors and instrumental instabilities. We present the results from a noise analysis for 42 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) observed with the European Pulsar Timing Array. For characterising the low-frequency, stochastic and achromatic noise component, or "timing noise", we employ two methods, based on Bayesian and frequentist statistics. For 25 MSPs, we achieve statistically significant measurements of their timing noise parameters and find that the two methods give consistent results. For the remaining 17 MSPs, we place upper limits on the timing noise amplitude at the 95% confidence level. We additionally place an upper limit on the contribution to the pulsar noise budget from errors in the reference terrestrial time standards (below 1%), and we find evidence for a noise component which is present only in the data of one of the four used telescopes. Finally, we estimate that the timing noise of individual pulsars reduces the sensitivity of this data set to an isotropic, stochastic GW background by a factor of >9.1 and by a factor of >2.3 for continuous GWs from resolvable, inspiralling supermassive black-hole binaries with circular orbits.
  • The Large European Array for Pulsars (LEAP) is an experiment that harvests the collective power of Europe's largest radio telescopes in order to increase the sensitivity of high-precision pulsar timing. As part of the ongoing effort of the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA), LEAP aims to go beyond the sensitivity threshold needed to deliver the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The five telescopes presently included in LEAP are: the Effelsberg telescope, the Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank, the Nan\c cay radio telescope, the Sardinia Radio Telescope and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Dual polarization, Nyquist-sampled time-series of the incoming radio waves are recorded and processed offline to form the coherent sum, resulting in a tied-array telescope with an effective aperture equivalent to a 195-m diameter circular dish. All observations are performed using a bandwidth of 128 MHz centered at a frequency of 1396 MHz. In this paper, we present the design of the LEAP experiment, the instrumentation, the storage and transfer of data, and the processing hardware and software. In particular, we present the software pipeline that was designed to process the Nyquist-sampled time-series, measure the phase and time delays between each individual telescope and a reference telescope and apply these delays to form the tied-array coherent addition. The pipeline includes polarization calibration and interference mitigation. We also present the first results from LEAP and demonstrate the resulting increase in sensitivity, which leads to an improvement in the pulse arrival times.
  • On a time scale of years to decades, gravitational wave (GW) astronomy will become a reality. Low frequency (nanoHz) GWs are detectable through long-term timing observations of the most stable pulsars. Radio observatories worldwide are currently carrying out observing programmes to detect GWs, with data sets being shared through the International Pulsar Timing Array project. One of the most likely sources of low frequency GWs are supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs), detectable as a background due to a large number of binaries, or as continuous or burst emission from individual sources. No GW signal has yet been detected, but stringent constraints are already being placed on galaxy evolution models. The SKA will bring this research to fruition. In this chapter, we describe how timing observations using SKA1 will contribute to detecting GWs, or can confirm a detection if a first signal already has been identified when SKA1 commences observations. We describe how SKA observations will identify the source(s) of a GW signal, search for anisotropies in the background, improve models of galaxy evolution, test theories of gravity, and characterise the early inspiral phase of a SMBHB system. We describe the impact of the large number of millisecond pulsars to be discovered by the SKA; and the observing cadence, observation durations, and instrumentation required to reach the necessary sensitivity. We describe the noise processes that will influence the achievable precision with the SKA. We assume a long-term timing programme using the SKA1-MID array and consider the implications of modifications to the current design. We describe the possible benefits from observations using SKA1-LOW. Finally, we describe GW detection prospects with SKA1 and SKA2, and end with a description of the expectations of GW astronomy.
  • The International Pulsar Timing Array project combines observations of pulsars from both Northern and Southern hemisphere observatories with the main aim of detecting ultra-low frequency (~10^-9 to 10^-8 Hz) gravitational waves. Here we introduce the project, review the methods used to search for gravitational waves emitted from coalescing supermassive binary black-hole systems in the centres of merging galaxies and discuss the status of the project.