• The binary system RW Aur consists of two classical T~Tauri stars (CTTSs). The primary recently underwent its second observed major dimming event ($\Delta V\,\sim2\,$mag). We present new, resolved Chandra X-ray and UKIRT near-IR (NIR) data as well as unresolved optical photometry obtained in the dim state to study the gas and dust content of the absorber causing the dimming. The X-ray data show that the absorbing column density increased from $N_H<0.1\times10^{22}\,$cm$^{-2}$ during the bright state to $\approx2\times10^{22}\,$cm$^{-2}$ in the dim state. The brightness ratio between dim and bright state at optical to NIR wavelengths shows only a moderate wavelength dependence and the NIR color-color diagram suggests no substantial reddening. Taken together, this indicates gray absorption by large grains ($\gtrsim1\,\mu$m) with a dust mass column density of $\gtrsim2\times10^{-4}\,$g$\,$cm$^{-2}$. Comparison with $N_H$ shows that an absorber responsible for the optical/NIR dimming and the X-ray absorption is compatible with the ISM's gas-to-dust ratio, i.e., that grains grow in the disk surface layers without largely altering the gas-to-dust ratio. Lastly, we discuss a scenario in which a common mechanism can explain the long-lasting dimming in RW Aur and recently in AA Tau.
  • The study of open clusters and their short period variable stars is fundamental in stellar evolution. Because the cluster members are formed in almost the same physical conditions, they share similar stellar properties such age and chemical composition. The assumption of common age, metallicity and distance impose strong constraints when modeling an ensemble of short period pulsators belonging to open clusters (e.g. Fox Machado et al., 2006). Very recently, Luo et al. (2009) carried out a search for variable stars in the direction of NGC 6811 with CCD photometry in B and V bands. They detected a total of sixteen variable stars. Among these variables, twelve were catalogued as $\delta$ {\it Scuti} stars, while no variability type was assigned to the remaining stars. In this paper we present $uvby\beta$ photoelectric photometry for the variable stars in the direction of NGC 6811.
  • From $uvby-\beta$ photometry of the open clusters NGC 6811 (75 stars), and NGC 6830 (19 stars) we were able to determine membership of the stars to each cluster, and fix the age and reddening for each. Since several short period stars have recently been found, we have carried out a study of these variables.
  • We present a general scheme for implementing bi-directional quantum state transfer in a quantum swapping channel. Unlike many other schemes for quantum computation and communication, our method does not require qubit couplings to be switched on and off. The only control variable is the bias acting on individual qubits. We show how to derive the parameters of the system (fixed and variable) such that perfect state transfer can be achieved. Since these parameters vary linearly with the pulse width, our scheme allows flexibility in the time scales under which qubits evolve. Unlike quantum spin networks, our scheme allows the transmission of several quantum states at a time, requiring only a two qubit separation between quantum states. By pulsing the biases of several qubits at the same time, we show that only eight bias control lines are required to achieve state transfer along a channel of arbitrary length. Furthermore, when the information to be transferred is purely classical in nature, only three bias control lines are required, greatly simplifying the circuit complexity.
  • We report on accretion- and outflow-related X-rays from T Tauri stars, based on results from the "XMM-Newton Extended Survey of the Taurus Molecular Cloud." X-rays potentially form in shocks of accretion streams near the stellar surface, although we hypothesize that direct interactions between the streams and magnetic coronae may occur as well. We report on the discovery of a "soft excess" in accreting T Tauri stars supporting these scenarios. We further discuss a new type of X-ray source in jet-driving T Tauri stars. It shows a strongly absorbed coronal component and a very soft, weakly absorbed component probably related to shocks in microjets. The excessive coronal absorption points to dust-depletion in the accretion streams.
  • We present an overview of recent X-ray observations of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars with XMM-Newton and Chandra. A new XMM spectrum of the nearby WN8 + OB binary WR 147 shows hard absorbed X-ray emission, including the Fe K-alpha line complex, characteristic of colliding wind shock sources. In contrast, sensitive observations of four of the closest known single WC (carbon-rich) WR stars have yielded only non-detections. These results tentatively suggest that single WC stars are X-ray quiet. The presence of a companion may thus be an essential factor in elevating the X-ray emission of WC + OB stars to detectable levels.
  • We present high-resolution Chandra HETGS X-ray spectra of the classical T Tauri star SU Aur. The quiescent X-ray emission is dominated by a 20-40 MK plasma, which contrasts strongly with the cool 3 MK plasma dominating the X-ray emission of the CTTS TW Hya. A large flare occurred during the first half of our 100 ks observation, and we have modelled the emitting plasma both during this flare and during the apparently quiescent periods. During the flare, an extremely high temperature plasma component (at least 60 MK) accounts for the bulk of the emission. There is an indication of the presence of Fe XXVI emission at 1.78 Angstrom, which is maximally formed at 130 MK.
  • We present new X-ray observations of the nearby Herbig Ae star HD 104237 (= DX Cha) with XMM-Newton, whose objective is to clarify the origin of the emission. Several X-ray emission lines are clearly visible in the CCD spectra, including the high-temperature Fe K-alpha complex. The emission can be accurately modeled as a multi-temperature thermal plasma with cool (kT < 1 keV) and hot (kT > 3 keV) components. The presence of a hot component is compelling evidence that the X-rays originate in magnetically confined plasma, either in the Herbig star itself or in the corona of an as yet unseen late-type companion. The X-ray temperatures and luminosity (log Lx = 30.5 ergs/s) are within the range expected for a T Tauri companion, but high resolution Chandra and HST images constrain the separation of a putative companion to less than 1 arcsec. We place these new results into broader context by comparing the X-ray and bolometric luminosities of a sample of nearby Herbig stars with those of T Tauri stars and classical main-sequence Be stars. We also test the predictions of a model that attributes the X-ray emission of Herbig stars to magnetic activity that is sustained by a shear-powered dynamo.
  • We present results of a sensitive 76 ksec Chandra observation of the young stellar cluster in NGC 2024 (d = 415 pc) in the Orion B giant molecular cloud. Previous infrared observations have shown that this remarkable cluster contains several hundred embedded young stars, most of which are still surrounded by circumstellar disks. Thus, it presents a rare opportunity to study X-ray activity in a large sample of optically invisible protostars and classical T Tauri stars (cTTS) undergoing accretion. Chandra detected 283 X-ray sources of which 248 were identified with counterparts at other wavelengths, mostly in the near-IR. Astrometric registration of Chandra images against 2MASS resulted in sub-arcsecond positional accuracy and high-confidence identifications of IR counterparts. The Chandra detections are characterized by hard heavily- absorbed spectra and spectacular variability. Spectral analysis of >100 sources gives a mean extinction A_v = 10.5 mag and typical plasma energies E = 3 keV. The range of variability includes rapid impulsive flares and persistent low-level fluctuations indicative of strong magnetic activity, as well as slow rises and falls in count rate whose origin is more obscure. Some outbursts reached sustained temperatures of kT = 6 - 10 keV. Chandra detected all but one of a subsample of 27 cTTS identified from previous IR photometry, and their X-ray and bolometric luminosities are correlated. We also report the X-ray detection of IRS 2b, which is thought to be a massive embedded late O or early B star that may be the ionizing source of NGC 2024. Seven millimeter-bright cores (FIR 1-7) in NGC 2024 that may be protostellar were not detected, with the possible exception of faint emission near the unusual core FIR-4.