• The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) of the Subaru Measurement of Images and Redshifts (SuMIRe) project for Subaru telescope consists in four identical spectrographs fed by 600 fibers each. Each spectrograph is composed by an optical entrance unit that creates a collimated beam and distributes the light to three channels, two visibles and one near infrared. This paper presents the on-going effort for the tests & integration process for the first spectrograph channel: we have developed a detailed Assembly Integration and Test (AIT) plan, as well as the methods, detailed processes and I&T tools. We describe the tools we designed to assemble the parts and to test the performance of the spectrograph. We also report on the thermal acceptance tests we performed on the first visible camera unit. We also report on and discuss the technical difficulties that did appear during this integration phase. Finally, we detail the important logistic process that is require to transport the components from other country to Marseille.
  • The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is a new facility instrument for Subaru Telescope which will be installed in around 2017. It is a multi-object spectrograph fed by about 2400 fibers placed at the prime focus covering a hexagonal field-of-view with 1.35 deg diagonals and capable of simultaneously obtaining data of spectra with wavelengths ranging from 0.38 um to 1.26 um. The spectrograph system is composed of four identical modules each receiving the light from 600 fibers. Each module incorporates three channels covering the wavelength ranges 0.38-0.65 mu ("Blue"), 0.63-0.97 mu ("Red"), and 0.94-1.26 mu ("NIR") respectively; with resolving power which progresses fairly smoothly from about 2000 in the blue to about 4000 in the infrared. An additional spectral mode allows reaching a spectral resolution of 5000 at 0.8mu (red). The proposed optical design is based on a Schmidt collimator facing three Schmidt cameras (one per spectral channel). This architecture is very robust, well known and documented. It allows for high image quality with only few simple elements (high throughput) at the expense of the central obscuration, which leads to larger optics. Each module has to be modular in its design to allow for integration and tests and for its safe transport up to the telescope: this is the main driver for the mechanical design. In particular, each module will be firstly fully integrated and validated at LAM (France) before it is shipped to Hawaii. All sub-assemblies will be indexed on the bench to allow for their accurate repositioning. This paper will give an overview of the spectrograph system which has successfully passed the Critical Design Review (CDR) in 2014 March and which is now in the construction phase.
  • Early data taken during commissioning of the SDSS have resulted in the discovery of a very cool white dwarf. It appears to have stronger collision induced absorption from molecular hydrogen than any other known white dwarf, suggesting it has a cooler temperature than any other. While its distance is presently unknown, it has a surprisingly small proper motion, making it unlikely to be a halo star. An analysis of white dwarf cooling times suggests that this object may be a low-mass star with a helium core. The SDSS imaging and spectroscopy also recovered LHS 3250, the coolest previously known white dwarf, indicating that the SDSS will be an effective tool for identifying these extreme objects.