• The Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the {\em Spitzer Space Telescope} observed nearly 800 point sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), taking over 1,000 spectra. 197 of these targets were observed as part of the Sage-Spec Spitzer Legacy program; the remainder are from a variety of different calibration, guaranteed time and open time projects. We classify these point sources into types according to their infrared spectral features, continuum and spectral energy distribution shape, bolometric luminosity, cluster membership, and variability information, using a decision-tree classification method. We then refine the classification using supplementary information from the astrophysical literature. We find that our IRS sample is comprised substantially of YSO and H\,{\sc ii} regions, post-Main Sequence low-mass stars: (post-)AGB stars and planetary nebulae and massive stars including several rare evolutionary types. Two supernova remnants, a nova and several background galaxies were also observed. We use these classifications to improve our understanding of the stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud, study the composition and characteristics of dust species in a variety of LMC objects, and to verify the photometric classification methods used by mid-IR surveys. We discover that some widely-used catalogues of objects contain considerable contamination and others are missing sources in our sample.
  • Context: Low- and intermediate-mass stars lose most of their stellar mass at the end of their lives on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Determining gas and dust mass-loss rates (MLRs) is important in quantifying the contribution of evolved stars to the enrichment of the interstellar medium. Aims: Attempt to, for the first time, spectrally resolve CO thermal line emission in a small sample of AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Methods: ALMA was used to observe 2 OH/IR stars and 4 carbon stars in the LMC in the CO J= 2-1 line. Results: We present the first measurement of expansion velocities in extragalactic carbon stars. All four C-stars are detected and wind expansion velocities and stellar velocities are directly measured. Mass-loss rates are derived from modelling the spectral energy distribution and Spitzer/IRS spectrum with the DUSTY code. Gas-to-dust ratios are derived that make the predicted velocities agree with the observed ones. The expansion velocities and MLRs are compared to a Galactic sample of well-studied relatively low MLRs stars supplemented with "extreme" C-stars that have properties more similar to the LMC targets. Gas MLRs derived from a simple formula are significantly smaller than derived from the dust modelling, indicating an order of magnitude underestimate of the estimated CO abundance, time-variable mass loss, or that the CO intensities in LMC stars are lower than predicted by the formula derived for Galactic objects. This could be related to a stronger interstellar radiation field in the LMC. Conclusions: Although the LMC sample is small and the comparison to Galactic stars is non-trivial because of uncertainties in their distances it appears that for C stars the wind expansion velocities in the LMC are lower than in the solar neighbourhood, while the MLRs appear similar. This is in agreement with dynamical dust-driven wind models.
  • Typical galaxies emit about one third of their energy in the infrared. The origin of this emission reprocessed starlight absorbed by interstellar dust grains and reradiated as thermal emission in the infrared. In particularly dusty galaxies, such as starburst galaxies, the fraction of energy emitted in the infrared can be as high as 90%. Dust emission is found to be an excellent tracer of the beginning and end stages of a star's life, where dust is being produced by post-main-sequence stars, subsequently added to the interstellar dust reservoir, and eventually being consumed by star and planet formation. This work reviews the current understanding of the size and properties of this interstellar dust reservoir, by using the Large Magellanic Cloud as an example, and what can be learned about the dust properties and star formation in galaxies from this dust reservoir, using SPICA, building on previous work performed with the Herschel and Spitzer Space Telescopes, as well as the Infrared Space Observatory.
  • The Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope observed 184 carbon stars in the Magellanic Clouds. This sample reveals that the dust-production rate (DPR) from carbon stars generally increases with the pulsation period of the star. The composition of the dust grains follows two condensation sequences, with more SiC condensing before amorphous carbon in metal-rich stars, and the order reversed in metal-poor stars. MgS dust condenses in optically thicker dust shells, and its condensation is delayed in more metal-poor stars. Metal-poor carbon stars also tend to have stronger absorption from C2H2 at 7.5 um. The relation between DPR and pulsation period shows significant apparent scatter, which results from the initial mass of the star, with more massive stars occupying a sequence parallel to lower-mass stars, but shifted to longer periods. Accounting for differences in the mass distribution between the carbon stars observed in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds reveals a hint of a subtle decrease in the DPR at lower metallicities, but it is not statistically significant. The most deeply embedded carbon stars have lower variability amplitudes and show SiC in absorption. In some cases they have bluer colors at shorter wavelengths, suggesting that the central star is becoming visible. These deeply embedded stars may be evolving off of the AGB and/or they may have non-spherical dust geometries.
  • Studying cyber-physical system (CPS) for a given network protocol and processor schedules is a challenging task. This investigation illustrates the role of TrueTime a MATLAB package for simulating CPS encapsulating information on processor schedules, and network protocols. Properties of CPS such as temporal behaviors, performance and stability can be studied using the TrueTime tool. Furthermore, these simulations can be used to benchmark design and propose design alternatives. The procedure to use the toolbox for simulations and instantiate various blocks to study CPS is illustrated in the paper. Finally, an illustrative example has been presented of CPS simulation with wireless network. Our example demonstrates that TrueTime is a useful tool for studying CPS performance, timing behavior, schedulability analysis, and studying suitable network protocols.
  • The Magellanic clouds are uniquely placed to study the stellar contribution to dust emission. Individual stars can be resolved in these systems even in the mid-infrared, and they are close enough to allow detection of infrared excess caused by dust.We have searched the Spitzer Space Telescope data archive for all Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) staring-mode observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and found that 209 Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) point sources within the footprint of the Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SAGE-SMC) Spitzer Legacy programme were targeted, within a total of 311 staring mode observations. We classify these point sources using a decision tree method of object classification, based on infrared spectral features, continuum and spectral energy distribution shape, bolometric luminosity, cluster membership and variability information. We find 58 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, 51 young stellar objects (YSOs), 4 post-AGB objects, 22 Red Supergiants (RSGs), 27 stars (of which 23 are dusty OB stars), 24 planetary nebulae (PNe), 10Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, 3 Hii regions, 3 R Coronae Borealis (R CrB) stars, 1 Blue Supergiant and 6 other objects, including 2 foreground AGB stars. We use these classifications to evaluate the success of photometric classification methods reported in the literature.
  • The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment identified over 1,800 carbon-rich Mira and semi-regular variables in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Multi-epoch infrared photometry reveals that the semi-regulars and Miras follow different sequences in color-color space when using colors sensitive to molecular absorption bands. The dustiest Miras have the strongest pulsation amplitudes and longest periods. Efforts to determine bolometric magnitudes reveal possible systematic errors with published bolometric corrections.
  • We present the first results from the SAGE-Var program, a follow on to the Spitzer legacy program Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE; Meixner, et al. 2006). We obtained 4 epochs of photometry at 3.6 & 4.5 microns covering the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the central region of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) in order to probe the variability of extremely red sources missed by variability surveys conducted at shorter wavelengths, and to provide additional epochs of observation for known variables. Our 6 total epochs of observations allow us to probe infrared variability on 15 different timescales ranging from ~20 days to ~5 years. Out of a full catalog of 1,717,554 (LMC) and 457,760 (SMC) objects, we find 10 (LMC) and 6 (SMC) large amplitude AGB variables without optically measured variability owing to circumstellar dust obscuration. The catalog also contains multiple observations of known AGB variables, type I and II Cepheids, eclipsing variables, R CrB stars and young stellar objects which will be discussed in following papers. Here we present infrared Period-Luminosity (PL) relations for classical Cepheids in the Magellanic Clouds, as well as improved PL relationships for AGB stars pulsating in the fundamental mode using mean magnitudes constructed from 6 epochs of observations.
  • K-band spectra are presented for a sample of 39 Spitzer IRS SAGE-Spec sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The spectra exhibit characteristics in very good agreement with their positions in the near infrared - Spitzer color-magnitude diagrams and their properties as deduced from the Spitzer IRS spectra. Specifically, the near infrared spectra show strong atomic and molecular features representative of oxygen-rich and carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars, respectively. A small subset of stars were chosen from the luminous and red extreme "tip" of the color magnitude diagram. These objects have properties consistent with dusty envelopes but also cool, carbon-rich "stellar" cores. Modest amounts of dust mass loss combine with the stellar spectral energy distribution to make these objects appear extreme in their near infrared and mid infrared colors. One object in our sample, HV 915, a known post asymptotic giant branch star of the RV Tau type exhibits CO 2.3 micron band head emission consistent with previous work that demonstrates the object has a circumstellar disk.
  • To measure the mass loss from dusty oxygen-rich (O-rich) evolved stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), we have constructed a grid of models of spherically-symmetric dust shells around stars with constant mass-loss rates using 2Dust. These models will constitute the O-rich model part of the "Grid of Red supergiant and Asymptotic giant branch star ModelS" (GRAMS). This model grid explores 4 parameters - stellar effective temperature from 2100 K - 4700 K; luminosity from 10^3-10^6 L_Sun; dust shell inner radii of 3, 7, 11, and 15 R_Star; and 10.0 micron optical depth from 10^-4 to 26. From an initial grid of ~1200 2Dust models, we create a larger grid of ~69,000 models by scaling to cover the luminosity range required by the data. These models are offered to the public on a website. The matching in color-magnitude diagrams and color-color diagrams to observed O-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) candidate stars from the SAGE and SAGE-Spec LMC samples and a small sample of OH/IR stars is generally very good. The extreme AGB star candidates from SAGE are more consistent with carbon-rich (C-rich) than O-rich dust composition. Our model grid suggests lower limits to the mid-infrared colors of the dustiest AGB stars for which the chemistry could be O-rich. Finally, the fitting of GRAMS models to SEDs of sources fit by other studies provides additional verification of our grid and anticipates future, more expansive efforts.
  • We observe a sample of 8 evolved stars in the Galactic Bulge in the CO J = 2 - 1 line using the Submillimeter Array (SMA) with angular resolution of 1 - 4 arcseconds. These stars have been detected previously at infrared wavelengths, and several of them have OH maser emission. We detect CO J = 2 - 1 emission from three of the sources in the sample: OH 359.943 +0.260, [SLO2003] A12, and [SLO2003] A51. We do not detect the remaining 5 stars in the sample because of heavy contamination from the galactic foreground CO emission. Combining CO data with observations at infrared wavelengths constraining dust mass loss from these stars, we determine the gas-to-dust ratios of the Galactic Bulge stars for which CO emission is detected. For OH 359.943 +0.260, we determine a gas mass-loss rate of 7.9 (+/- 2.2) x 10^-5 M_Sun/year and a gas-to-dust ratio of 310 (+/- 89). For [SLO2003] A12, we find a gas mass-loss rate of 5.4 (+/- 2.8) x 10^-5 M_Sun/year and a gas-to-dust ratio of 220 (+/- 110). For [SLO2003] A51, we find a gas mass-loss rate of 3.4 (+/- 3.0) x 10^-5 M_Sun/year and a gas-to-dust ratio of 160 (+/- 140), reflecting the low quality of our tentative detection of the CO J = 2 - 1 emission from A51. We find the CO J = 2 - 1 detections of OH/IR stars in the Galactic Bulge require lower average CO J = 2 - 1 backgrounds.
  • We model multi-wavelength broadband UBVIJHKs and Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry and IRS spectra from the SAGE and SAGE-Spec observing programs of two oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (O-rich AGB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using radiative transfer models of dust shells around stars. We chose a star from each of the bright and faint O-rich AGB populations found by earlier studies of the SAGE sample in order to derive a baseline set of dust properties to be used in the construction of an extensive grid of radiative transfer models of the O-rich AGB stars found in the SAGE surveys. From the bright O-rich AGB population we chose HV 5715, and from the faint O-rich AGB population we chose SSTISAGE1C J052206.92-715017.6 (SSTSAGE052206). We found the complex indices of refraction of oxygen-deficient silicates from Ossenkopf et al (1992) and a "KMH"-like grain size distribution with gamma of -3.5, a_min of 0.01 microns, and a_0 of 0.1 microns to be reasonable dust properties for these models. There is a slight indication that the dust around the faint O-rich AGB may be more silica-rich than that around the bright O-rich AGB. Simple models of gas emission suggest a relatively extended gas envelope for the faint O-rich AGB star modeled, consistent with the relatively large dust shell inner radius for the same model. The models compute the dust mass-loss rates for the two stars to be 2.0x10^-9 M_Sun/yr and 2.3x10^-9 M_Sun/yr, respectively. When a dust-to-gas mass ratio of 0.002 is assumed for SSTSAGE052206 and HV 5715, the dust mass-loss rates imply total mass-loss rates of 1.0x10^-6 M_Sun/yr and 1.2x10^-6 M_Sun/yr, respectively. These properties of the dust shells and stars, as inferred from our models of the two stars, are found to be consistent with properties observed or assumed by detailed studies of other O-rich AGB stars in the LMC and elsewhere.
  • In order to determine the composition of the dust in the circumstellar envelopes of oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars we have computed a grid of modust radiative-transfer models for a range of dust compositions, mass-loss rates, dust shell inner radii and stellar parameters. We compare the resulting colours with the observed oxygen-rich AGB stars from the SAGE-Spec Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) sample, finding good overall agreement for stars with a mid-infrared excess. We use these models to fit a sample of 37 O-rich AGB stars in the LMC with optically thin circumstellar envelopes, for which 5$-$35-$\mu$m Spitzer infrared spectrograph (IRS) spectra and broadband photometry from the optical to the mid-infrared are available. From the modelling, we find mass-loss rates in the range $\sim 8\times10^{-8}$ to $5\times10^{-6}$ M$_{\odot}\ \mathrm{yr}^{-1}$, and we show that a grain mixture consisting primarily of amorphous silicates, with contributions from amorphous alumina and metallic iron provides a good fit to the observed spectra. Furthermore, we show from dust models that the AKARI [11]$-$[15] versus [3.2]$-$[7] colour-colour diagram, is able to determine the fractional abundance of alumina in O-rich AGB stars.
  • We investigate the occurrence of crystalline silicates in oxygen-rich evolved stars across a range of metallicities and mass-loss rates. It has been suggested that the crystalline silicate feature strength increases with increasing mass-loss rate, implying a correlation between lattice structure and wind density. To test this, we analyse Spitzer IRS and Infrared Space Observatory SWS spectra of 217 oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch stars and 98 red supergiants in the Milky Way, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds and Galactic globular clusters. These encompass a range of spectral morphologies from the spectrally-rich which exhibit a wealth of crystalline and amorphous silicate features to 'naked' (dust-free) stars. We combine spectroscopic and photometric observations with the GRAMS grid of radiative transfer models to derive (dust) mass-loss rates and temperature. We then measure the strength of the crystalline silicate bands at 23, 28 and 33 microns. We detect crystalline silicates in stars with dust mass-loss rates which span over 3 dex, down to rates of ~10^-9 solar masses/year. Detections of crystalline silicates are more prevalent in higher mass-loss rate objects, though the highest mass-loss rate objects do not show the 23-micron feature, possibly due to the low temperature of the forsterite grains or it may indicate that the 23-micron band is going into absorption due to high column density. Furthermore, we detect a change in the crystalline silicate mineralogy with metallicity, with enstatite seen increasingly at low metallicity.
  • We present results from the first application of the Grid of Red Supergiant and Asymptotic Giant Branch ModelS (GRAMS) model grid to the entire evolved stellar population of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). GRAMS is a pre-computed grid of 80,843 radiative transfer (RT) models of evolved stars and circumstellar dust shells composed of either silicate or carbonaceous dust. We fit GRAMS models to ~30,000 Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) and Red Supergiant (RSG) stars in the LMC, using 12 bands of photometry from the optical to the mid-infrared. Our published dataset consists of thousands of evolved stars with individually determined evolutionary parameters such as luminosity and mass-loss rate. The GRAMS grid has a greater than 80% accuracy rate discriminating between Oxygen- and Carbon-rich chemistry. The global dust injection rate to the interstellar medium (ISM) of the LMC from RSGs and AGB stars is on the order of 1.5x10^(-5) solar masses/yr, equivalent to a total mass injection rate (including the gas) into the ISM of ~5x10^(-3) solar masses/yr. Carbon stars inject two and a half times as much dust into the ISM as do O-rich AGB stars, but the same amount of mass. We determine a bolometric correction factor for C-rich AGB stars in the K band as a function of J - K color, BC(K) = -0.40(J-K)^2 + 1.83(J-K) + 1.29. We determine several IR color proxies for the dust mass-loss rate (MLR) from C-rich AGB stars, such as log (MLR) = (-18.90)/((K-[8.0])+3.37)-5.93. We find that a larger fraction of AGB stars exhibiting the `long-secondary period' phenomenon are O-rich than stars dominated by radial pulsations, and AGB stars without detectable mass-loss do not appear on either the first-overtone or fundamental-mode pulsation sequences.
  • NGC 1097 is a nearby Seyfert 1 galaxy with a bright circumnuclear starburst ring, a strong large-scale bar and an active nucleus. We present a detailed study of the spatial variation of the far infrared (FIR) [CII]158um and [OI]63um lines and mid-infrared H2 emission lines as tracers of gas cooling, and of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bands as tracers of the photoelectric heating, using Herschel-PACS, and Spitzer-IRS infrared spectral maps. We focus on the nucleus and the ring, and two star forming regions (Enuc N and Enuc S). We estimated a photoelectric gas heating efficiency ([CII]158um+[OI]63um)/PAH in the ring about 50% lower than in Enuc N and S. The average 11.3/7.7um PAH ratio is also lower in the ring, which may suggest a larger fraction of ionized PAHs, but no clear correlation with [CII]158{\mu}m/PAH(5.5 - 14um) is found. PAHs in the ring are responsible for a factor of two more [CII]158um and [OI]63um emission per unit mass than PAHs in the Enuc S. SED modeling indicates that at most 25% of the FIR power in the ring and Enuc S can come from high intensity photodissociation regions (PDRs), in which case G0 ~ 10^2.3 and nH ~ 10^3.5 cm^-3 in the ring. For these values of G0 and nH PDR models cannot reproduce the observed H2 emission. Much of the the H2 emission in the starburst ring could come from warm regions in the diffuse ISM that are heated by turbulent dissipation or shocks.
  • The KINGFISH project (Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: a Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel) is an imaging and spectroscopic survey of 61 nearby (d < 30 Mpc) galaxies, chosen to cover a wide range of galaxy properties and local interstellar medium (ISM) environments found in the nearby Universe. Its broad goals are to characterize the ISM of present-day galaxies, the heating and cooling of their gaseous and dust components, and to better understand the physical processes linking star formation and the ISM. KINGFISH is a direct descendant of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS), which produced complete Spitzer imaging and spectroscopic mapping and a comprehensive set of multi-wavelength ancillary observations for the sample. The Herschel imaging consists of complete maps for the galaxies at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns. The spectal line imaging of the principal atomic ISM cooling lines ([OI]63um, [OIII]88um, [NII]122,205um, and [CII]158um) covers the subregions in the centers and disks that already have been mapped in the mid-infrared with Spitzer. The KINGFISH and SINGS multi-wavelength datasets combined provide panchromatic mapping of the galaxies sufficient to resolve individual star-forming regions, and tracing the important heating and cooling channels of the ISM, across a wide range of local extragalactic ISM environments. This paper summarizes the scientific strategy for KINGFISH, the properties of the galaxy sample, the observing strategy, and data processing and products. It also presents a combined Spitzer and Herschel image atlas for the KINGFISH galaxies, covering the wavelength range 3.6 -- 500 microns. All imaging and spectroscopy data products will be released to the Herschel user generated product archives.
  • In this paper, we present a stabilized mixed formulation for unsteady Brinkman equation. The formulation is systematically derived based on the variational multiscale formalism and the method of horizontal lines. The derivation does not need the assumption that the fine-scale variables do not depend on the time, which is the case with the conventional derivation of multiscale stabilized formulations for transient mixed problems. An expression for the stabilization parameter is obtained in terms of a bubble function, and appropriate bubble functions for various finite elements are also presented. Under the proposed formulation, equal-order interpolation for the velocity and pressure (which is computationally the most convenient) is stable. Representative numerical results are presented to illustrate the performance of the proposed formulation. Spatial and temporal convergence studies are also performed, and the proposed formulation performed well.
  • Galactic cirrus emission at far-infrared wavelengths affects many extragalactic observations. Separating this emission from that associated with extragalactic objects is both important and difficult. In this paper we discuss a particular case, the M81 group, and the identification of diffuse structures prominent in the infrared, but also detected at optical wavelengths. The origin of these structures has previously been controversial, ranging from them being the result of a past interaction between M81 and M82 or due to more local Galactic emission. We show that over of order a few arcminute scales the far-infrared (Herschel 250 &\mu&m) emission correlates spatially very well with a particular narrow velocity (2-3 km/s) component of the Galactic HI. We find no evidence that any of the far-infrared emission associated with these features actually originates in the M81 group. Thus we infer that the associated diffuse optical emission must be due to galactic light back scattered off dust in our galaxy. Ultra-violet observations pick out young stellar associations around M81, but no detectable far-infrared emission. We consider in detail one of the Galactic cirrus features, finding that the far-infrared HI relation breaks down below arc minute scales and that at smaller scales there can be quite large dust temperature variations.
  • We present the classification of 197 point sources observed with the Infrared Spectrograph in the SAGE-Spec Legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We introduce a decision-tree method of object classification based on infrared spectral features, continuum and spectral energy distribution shape, bolometric luminosity, cluster membership, and variability information, which is used to classify the SAGE-Spec sample of point sources. The decision tree has a broad application to mid-infrared spectroscopic surveys, where supporting photometry and variability information are available. We use these classifications to make deductions about the stellar populations of the Large Magellanic Cloud and the success of photometric classification methods. We find 90 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, 29 young stellar objects, 23 post-AGB objects, 19 red supergiants, eight stellar photospheres, seven background galaxies, seven planetary nebulae, two HII regions and 12 other objects, seven of which remain unclassified.
  • The HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) of the Magellanic Clouds will use dust emission to investigate the life cycle of matter in both the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC). Using the Herschel Space Observatory's PACS and SPIRE photometry cameras, we imaged a 2x8 square degree strip through the LMC, at a position angle of ~22.5 degrees as part of the science demonstration phase of the Herschel mission. We present the data in all 5 Herschel bands: PACS 100 and 160 {\mu}m and SPIRE 250, 350 and 500 {\mu}m. We present two dust models that both adequately fit the spectral energy distribution for the entire strip and both reveal that the SPIRE 500 {\mu}m emission is in excess of the models by 6 to 17%. The SPIRE emission follows the distribution of the dust mass, which is derived from the model. The PAH-to-dust mass (f_PAH) image of the strip reveals a possible enhancement in the LMC bar in agreement with previous work. We compare the gas mass distribution derived from the HI 21 cm and CO J=1-0 line emission maps to the dust mass map from the models and derive gas-to-dust mass ratios (GDRs). The dust model, which uses the standard graphite and silicate optical properties for Galactic dust, has a very low GDR = 65(+15,-18) making it an unrealistic dust model for the LMC. Our second dust model, which uses amorphous carbon instead of graphite, has a flatter emissivity index in the submillimeter and results in a GDR = 287(+25,-42) that is more consistent with a GDR inferred from extinction.
  • By combining Herschel-SPIRE data with archival Spitzer, HI, and CO maps, we investigate the spatial distribution of gas and dust in the two famous grand-design spirals M99 and M100 in the Virgo cluster. Thanks to the unique resolution and sensitivity of the Herschel-SPIRE photometer, we are for the first time able to measure the distribution and extent of cool, submillimetre (submm)-emitting dust inside and beyond the optical radius. We compare this with the radial variation in both the gas mass and the metallicity. Although we adopt a model-independent, phenomenological approach, our analysis provides important insights. We find the dust extending to at least the optical radius of the galaxy and showing breaks in its radial profiles at similar positions as the stellar distribution. The colour indices f350/f500 and f250/f350 decrease radially consistent with the temperature decreasing with radius. We also find evidence of an increasing gas to dust ratio with radius in the outer regions of both galaxies.
  • Massive evolved stars can produce large amounts of dust, and far-infrared (IR) data are essential for determining the contribution of cold dust to the total dust mass. Using Herschel, we search for cold dust in three very dusty massive evolved stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud: R71 is a Luminous Blue Variable, HD36402 is a Wolf-Rayet triple system, and IRAS05280-6910 is a red supergiant. We model the spectral energy distributions using radiative transfer codes and find that these three stars have mass-loss rates up to 10^-3 solar masses/year, suggesting that high-mass stars are important contributors to the life-cycle of dust. We found far-IR excesses in two objects, but these excesses appear to be associated with ISM and star-forming regions. Cold dust (T < 100 K) may thus not be an important contributor to the dust masses of evolved stars.
  • We present Herschel-SPIRE observations of the perturbed galaxy NGC4438 in the Virgo cluster. These images reveal the presence of extra-planar dust up to ~4-5 kpc away from the galaxy's disk. The dust closely follows the distribution of the stripped atomic and molecular hydrogen, supporting the idea that gas and dust are perturbed in a similar fashion by the cluster environment. Interestingly, the extra-planar dust lacks a warm temperature component when compared to the material still present in the disk, explaining why it was missed by previous far-infrared investigations. Our study provides evidence for dust stripping in clusters of galaxies and illustrates the potential of Herschel data for our understanding of environmental effects on galaxy evolution.
  • The standard method of mapping the interstellar medium in a galaxy, by observing the molecular gas in the CO 1-0 line and the atomic gas in the 21-cm line, is largely limited with current telescopes to galaxies in the nearby universe. In this letter, we use SPIRE observations of the galaxies M99 and M100 to explore the alternative approach of mapping the interstellar medium using the continuum emission from the dust. We have compared the methods by measuring the relationship between the star-formation rate and the surface density of gas in the galaxies. We find the two methods give relationships with a similar dispersion, confirming that observing the continuum emission from the dust is a promising method of mapping the interstellar medium in galaxies.