• A discussion regarding the progenitor system of the nova and dwarf nova system V392 Persei using archival data from 2MASS and WISE. We find that the system is unlikely to contain a luminous red giant donor (i.e. a symbiotic system), but cannot exclude the presence of a lower luminosity red giant or a sub-giant donor. The similarity of the SED of the quiescent V392 Per to that of GK Persei is noted.
  • A. De Angelis, V. Tatischeff, I. A. Grenier, J. McEnery, M. Mallamaci, M. Tavani, U. Oberlack, L. Hanlon, R. Walter, A. Argan, P. Von Ballmoos, A. Bulgarelli, A. Bykov, M. Hernanz, G. Kanbach, I. Kuvvetli, M. Pearce, A. Zdziarski, J. Conrad, G. Ghisellini, A. Harding, J. Isern, M. Leising, F. Longo, G. Madejski, M. Martinez, M. N. Mazziotta, J. M. Paredes, M. Pohl, R. Rando, M. Razzano, A. Aboudan, M. Ackermann, A. Addazi, M. Ajello, C. Albertus, J. M. Alvarez, G. Ambrosi, S. Anton, L. A. Antonelli, A. Babic, B. Baibussinov, M. Balbo, L. Baldini, S. Balman, C. Bambi, U. Barres de Almeida, J. A. Barrio, R. Bartels, D. Bastieri, W. Bednarek, D. Bernard, E. Bernardini, T. Bernasconi, B. Bertucci, A. Biland, E. Bissaldi, M. Boettcher, V. Bonvicini, V. Bosch Ramon, E. Bottacini, V. Bozhilov, T. Bretz, M. Branchesi, V. Brdar, T. Bringmann, A. Brogna, C. Budtz Jorgensen, G. Busetto, S. Buson, M. Busso, A. Caccianiga, S. Camera, R. Campana, P. Caraveo, M. Cardillo, P. Carlson, S. Celestin, M. Cermeno, A. Chen, C. C Cheung, E. Churazov, S. Ciprini, A. Coc, S. Colafrancesco, A. Coleiro, W. Collmar, P. Coppi, R. Curado da Silva, S. Cutini, F. DAmmando, B. De Lotto, D. de Martino, A. De Rosa, M. Del Santo, L. Delgado, R. Diehl, S. Dietrich, A. D. Dolgov, A. Dominguez, D. Dominis Prester, I. Donnarumma, D. Dorner, M. Doro, M. Dutra, D. Elsaesser, M. Fabrizio, A. FernandezBarral, V. Fioretti, L. Foffano, V. Formato, N. Fornengo, L. Foschini, A. Franceschini, A. Franckowiak, S. Funk, F. Fuschino, D. Gaggero, G. Galanti, F. Gargano, D. Gasparrini, R. Gehrz, P. Giammaria, N. Giglietto, P. Giommi, F. Giordano, M. Giroletti, G. Ghirlanda, N. Godinovic, C. Gouiffes, J. E. Grove, C. Hamadache, D. H. Hartmann, M. Hayashida, A. Hryczuk, P. Jean, T. Johnson, J. Jose, S. Kaufmann, B. Khelifi, J. Kiener, J. Knodlseder, M. Kole, J. Kopp, V. Kozhuharov, C. Labanti, S. Lalkovski, P. Laurent, O. Limousin, M. Linares, E. Lindfors, M. Lindner, J. Liu, S. Lombardi, F. Loparco, R. LopezCoto, M. Lopez Moya, B. Lott, P. Lubrano, D. Malyshev, N. Mankuzhiyil, K. Mannheim, M. J. Marcha, A. Marciano, B. Marcote, M. Mariotti, M. Marisaldi, S. McBreen, S. Mereghetti, A. Merle, R. Mignani, G. Minervini, A. Moiseev, A. Morselli, F. Moura, K. Nakazawa, L. Nava, D. Nieto, M. Orienti, M. Orio, E. Orlando, P. Orleanski, S. Paiano, R. Paoletti, A. Papitto, M. Pasquato, B. Patricelli, M. A. PerezGarcia, M. Persic, G. Piano, A. Pichel, M. Pimenta, C. Pittori, T. Porter, J. Poutanen, E. Prandini, N. Prantzos, N. Produit, S. Profumo, F. S. Queiroz, S. Raino, A. Raklev, M. Regis, I. Reichardt, Y. Rephaeli, J. Rico, W. Rodejohann, G. Rodriguez Fernandez, M. Roncadelli, L. Roso, A. Rovero, R. Ruffini, G. Sala, M. A. SanchezConde, A. Santangelo, P. Saz Parkinson, T. Sbarrato, A. Shearer, R. Shellard, K. Short, T. Siegert, C. Siqueira, P. Spinelli, A. Stamerra, S. Starrfield, A. Strong, I. Strumke, F. Tavecchio, R. Taverna, T. Terzic, D. J. Thompson, O. Tibolla, D. F. Torres, R. Turolla, A. Ulyanov, A. Ursi, A. Vacchi, J. Van den Abeele, G. Vankova Kirilovai, C. Venter, F. Verrecchia, P. Vincent, X. Wang, C. Weniger, X. Wu, G. Zaharijas, L. Zampieri, S. Zane, S. Zimmer, A. Zoglauer, the eASTROGAM collaboration
    e-ASTROGAM (enhanced ASTROGAM) is a breakthrough Observatory space mission, with a detector composed by a Silicon tracker, a calorimeter, and an anticoincidence system, dedicated to the study of the non-thermal Universe in the photon energy range from 0.3 MeV to 3 GeV - the lower energy limit can be pushed to energies as low as 150 keV for the tracker, and to 30 keV for calorimetric detection. The mission is based on an advanced space-proven detector technology, with unprecedented sensitivity, angular and energy resolution, combined with polarimetric capability. Thanks to its performance in the MeV-GeV domain, substantially improving its predecessors, e-ASTROGAM will open a new window on the non-thermal Universe, making pioneering observations of the most powerful Galactic and extragalactic sources, elucidating the nature of their relativistic outflows and their effects on the surroundings. With a line sensitivity in the MeV energy range one to two orders of magnitude better than previous generation instruments, e-ASTROGAM will determine the origin of key isotopes fundamental for the understanding of supernova explosion and the chemical evolution of our Galaxy. The mission will provide unique data of significant interest to a broad astronomical community, complementary to powerful observatories such as LIGO-Virgo-GEO600-KAGRA, SKA, ALMA, E-ELT, TMT, LSST, JWST, Athena, CTA, IceCube, KM3NeT, and LISA.
  • Since its discovery in 2008, the Andromeda galaxy nova M31N 2008-12a has been observed in eruption every single year. This unprecedented frequency indicates an extreme object, with a massive white dwarf and a high accretion rate, which is the most promising candidate for the single-degenerate progenitor of a type-Ia supernova known to date. The previous three eruptions of M31N 2008-12a have displayed remarkably homogeneous multi-wavelength properties: (i) From a faint peak, the optical light curve declined rapidly by two magnitudes in less than two days; (ii) Early spectra showed initial high velocities that slowed down significantly within days and displayed clear He/N lines throughout; (iii) The supersoft X-ray source (SSS) phase of the nova began extremely early, six days after eruption, and only lasted for about two weeks. In contrast, the peculiar 2016 eruption was clearly different. Here we report (i) the considerable delay in the 2016 eruption date, (ii) the significantly shorter SSS phase, and (iii) the brighter optical peak magnitude (with a hitherto unobserved cusp shape). Early theoretical models suggest that these three different effects can be consistently understood as caused by a lower quiescence mass-accretion rate. The corresponding higher ignition mass caused a brighter peak in the free-free emission model. The less-massive accretion disk experienced greater disruption, consequently delaying re-establishment of effective accretion. Without the early refueling, the SSS phase was shortened. Observing the next few eruptions will determine whether the properties of the 2016 outburst make it a genuine outlier in the evolution of M31N 2008-12a.
  • We present infrared spectroscopy of the classical nova V339 Delphini, obtained over a $\sim2$ year period. The infrared emission lines were initially symmetrical, with HWHM velocities of 525 km s$^{-1}$. In later ($t\gtrsim77$days, where $t$ is the time from outburst) spectra however, the lines displayed a distinct asymmetry, with a much stronger blue wing, possibly due to obscuration of the receding component by dust. Dust formation commenced at $\sim$ day 34.75 at a condensation temperature of $1480\pm20$K, consistent with graphitic carbon. Thereafter the dust temperature declined with time as $T_{\rm d}\propto{t}^{-0.346}$, also consistent with graphitic carbon. The mass of dust initally rose, as a result of an increase in grain size and/or number, peaked at $\sim$ day 100, and then declined precipitously. This decline was most likely caused by grain shattering due to electrostatic stress after the dust was exposed to X-radiation. An Appendix summarises Planck Means for carbon, and the determination of grain mass and radius for a carbon dust shell.
  • Classical novae are the product of thermonuclear runaway-initiated explosions occurring on accreting white dwarfs. V339 Del (Nova Delphinus 2013) was one of the brightest classical novae of the last hundred years. Spectroscopy and photometry are available from $\gamma$-rays through infrared at stages that have frequently not been well observed. The complete data set is intended to provide a benchmark for comparison with modeling and for understanding more sparsely monitored historical classical and recurrent novae. This paper is the first in the series of reports on the development of the nova. We report here on the early stages of the outburst, through the X-ray active stage. A time sequence of optical, flux calibrated high resolution spectra was obtained with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) using FIES simultaneously, or contemporaneously, with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope during the early stages of the outburst. These were supplemented with MERCATOR/HERMES optical spectra. High resolution IUE ultraviolet spectra of OS And 1986, taken during the Fe curtain phase, served as a template for the distance determination. We used standard plasma diagnostics (e.g., [O III] and [N II] line ratios, and the H$\beta$ line flux) to constrain electron densities and temperatures of the ejecta. Using Monte Carlo modeling of the ejecta, we derived the structure, filling factor, and mass from comparisons of the optical and ultraviolet line profiles.
  • We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detections of high-energy (>100 MeV) gamma-ray emission from two recent optically bright classical novae, V1369 Centauri 2013 and V5668 Sagittarii 2015. At early times, Fermi target-of-opportunity observations prompted by their optical discoveries provided enhanced LAT exposure that enabled the detections of gamma-ray onsets beginning ~2 days after their first optical peaks. Significant gamma-ray emission was found extending to 39-55 days after their initial LAT detections, with systematically fainter and longer duration emission compared to previous gamma-ray detected classical novae. These novae were distinguished by multiple bright optical peaks that encompassed the timespans of the observed gamma rays. The gamma-ray light curves and spectra of the two novae are presented along with representative hadronic and leptonic models, and comparisons to other novae detected by the LAT are discussed.
  • Nova LMC 2009a is confirmed as a Recurrent Nova (RN) from positional coincidence with nova LMC 1971b. The observational data set is one of the most comprehensive for any Galactic or extragalactic RN: optical and near-IR photometry from outburst until over 6 years later; optical spectra for the first 6 months, and Swift satellite Ultraviolet and X-ray observations from 9 days to almost 1 year post-outburst. We find $M_V = -8.4\pm0.8_{\mathrm{r}}\pm0.7_{\mathrm{s}}$ and expansion velocities between 1000 and 4000 km s$^{-1}$. Coronal line emission before day 9 indicates shocks in the ejecta. Strengthening of He II $\lambda$4686 preceded the emergence of the Super-Soft Source (SSS) in X-rays at $\sim63-70$ days, which was initially very variable. Periodic modulations, $P=1.2$ days, most probably orbital in nature, were evident in the UV and optical from day 43. Subsequently, the SSS shows an oscillation with the same period but with a delay of 0.28P. The progenitor system has been identified; the secondary is most likely a sub-giant feeding a luminous accretion disk. Properties of the SSS infer a white dwarf (WD) mass $1.1 \mathrm{M}_\odot \lesssim M_{\rm WD} \lesssim 1.3 \mathrm{M}_\odot$. If the accretion occurs at constant rate, $\dot{\it{M}}_{\rm acc} \simeq 3.6^{+4.7}_{-2.5} \times 10^{-7} \mathrm{M}_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ is needed, consistent with nova models for an inter-eruption interval of 38 years, low outburst amplitude, progenitor position in the color-magnitude diagram, and spectral energy distribution at quiescence. We note striking similarities between LMC 2009a and the Galactic nova KT Eri, suggesting that KT Eri is a candidate RN.
  • We present the results from observing nine Galactic novae in eruption with the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) between 2004 and 2009. While many of these novae reached peak magnitudes that were either at or approaching the detection limits of SMEI, we were still able to produce light curves that in many cases contained more data at and around the initial rise, peak, and decline than those found in other variable star catalogs. For each nova, we obtained a peak time, maximum magnitude, and for several an estimate of the decline time (t2). Interestingly, although of lower quality than those found in Hounsell et al. (2010a), two of the light curves may indicate the presence of a pre-maximum halt. In addition the high cadence of the SMEI instrument has allowed the detection of low amplitude variations in at least one of the nova light curves.
  • We present observations of CK Vul obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The infrared spectrum reveals a warm dust continuum with nebular, molecular hydrogen and HCN lines superimposed, together with the "Unidentified Infrared" (UIR) features. The nebular lines are consistent with emission by a low density gas. We conclude that the Spitzer data, combined with other information, are incompatible with CK Vul being a classical nova remnant in "hibernation" after the event of 1670, a "Very Late Thermal Pulse", a "Luminous Red Variable" such as V838 Mon, or a "Diffusion-induced nova". The true nature of CK Vul remains a mystery.
  • We present the results of the spectroscopic and photometric monitoring campaign of ASASSN-15ed. The transient was discovered quite young by the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN). Amateur astronomers allowed us to sample the photometric SN evolution around maximum light, which we estimate to have occurred on JD = 2457087.4 +- 0.6 in the r-band. Its apparent r-band magnitude at maximum was r = 16.91 +- 0.10, providing an absolute magnitude M(r) ~ -20.04 +- 0.20, which is slightly more luminous than the typical magnitudes estimated for Type Ibn SNe. The post-peak evolution was well monitored, and the decline rate (being in most bands around 0.1 mag/d during the first 25 d after maximum) is marginally slower than the average decline rates of SNe Ibn during the same time interval. The object was initially classified as a Type Ibn SN because early-time spectra were characterized by a blue continuum with superimposed narrow P-Cygni lines of He I, suggesting the presence of a slowly moving (1200-1500 km/s), He-rich circumstellar medium. Later on, broad P-Cygni He I lines became prominent. The inferred velocities, as measured from the minimum of the broad absorption components, were between 6000 and 7000 km/s. As we attribute these broad features to the SN ejecta, this is the first time we have observed the transition of a Type Ibn SN to a Type Ib SN.
  • Transient short-period <100s oscillations have been found in the X-ray light curves of three novae during their SSS phase and in one persistent SSS. We pursue an observational approach to determine possible driving mechanisms and relations to fundamental system parameters such as the white dwarf mass. We performed a systematic search for short-period oscillations in all available XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray light curves of persistent SSS and novae during their SSS phase. To study time evolution, we divided each light curve into short time segments and computed power spectra. We then constructed dynamic power spectra from which we identified transient periodic signals even when only present for a short time. From all time segments of each system, we computed fractions of time when periodic signals were detected. In addition to the previously known systems with short-period oscillations, RS Oph (35s), KT Eri (35s), V339 Del (54s), and Cal 83 (67s), we found one additional system, LMC 2009a (33s), and also confirm the 35s period from Chandra data of KT Eri. The amplitudes of oscillations are of order <15% of the respective count rates and vary without any clear dependence on the X-ray count rate. The fractions of the time when the respective periods were detected at 2-sigma significance (duty cycle) are 11.3%, 38.8%, 16.9%, 49.2%, and 18.7% for LMC 2009a, RS Oph, KT Eri, V339 Del, and Cal 83, respectively. The respective highest duty cycles found in a single observation are 38.1%, 74.5%, 61.4%, 67.8%, and 61.8%.
  • With six recorded nova outbursts, the prototypical recurrent nova T Pyxidis is the ideal cataclysmic variable system to assess the net change of the white dwarf mass within a nova cycle. Recent estimates of the mass ejected in the 2011 outburst ranged from a few 1.E-5 sollar mass to 3.3E-4 sollar mass, and assuming a mass accretion rate of 1.E-8 to 1.E-7 Sollar mass/yr for 44yrs, it has been concluded that the white dwaf in T Pyx is actually losing mass. Using NLTE disk modeling spectra to fit our recently obtained Hubble Space Telescope (HST) COS and STIS spectra, we find a mass accretion rate of up to two orders of magnitude larger than previously estimated. Our larger mass accretion rate is due mainly to the newly derived distance of T Pyx (4.8kpc; Sokoloski et al. 2013, larger than the previous 3.5kpc estimate), our derived reddening of E(B-V)=0.35 (based on combined IUE and GALEX spectra) and NLTE disk modeling (compared to black body and raw flux estimates in earlier works). We find that for most values of the reddening (0.25 < E(B-V) < 0.50) and white dwaf mass (0.70 to 1.35 Sollar mass) the accreted mass is larger than the ejected mass. Only for a low reddening (0.25 and smaller) combined with a large white dwaf mass (0.9 sollar mass and larger) is the ejected mass larger than the accreted one. However, the best spectral fitting results are obtained for a larger value of the reddening.
  • Super-Soft-Source (SSS) X-ray spectra are blackbody-like spectra with effective temperatures ~3-7x10^5 K and luminosities of 10^{35-38} erg/s. SSS grating spectra display atmospheric absorption lines. Radiation transport atmosphere models can be used to derive physical parameters, but more sophisticated models are required. We bypass the complications of spectral models and concentrate on the data in a comparative, qualitative study. We inspect all available X-ray grating SSS spectra to determine systematic, model-independent trends. We use comparative plots of spectra of different systems to find common and different features. The results are interpreted in the context of system parameters obtained from the literature. We find two distinct types of SSS spectra which we name SSa and SSe. Their main observational characteristics are either clearly visible absorption lines or emission lines, respectively, while both types contain atmospheric continuum emission. SSe may be obscured SSa systems, which is supported by similarities between SSe and SSa with obscured and unobscured AGN, respectively. Further, we find all known or suspected high-inclination systems to emit permanently in an SSe state. Some sources are found to transition between SSa and SSe states, becoming SSe when fainter. SSS spectra are subject to various occultation processes. In Cal 87, the accretion disc blocks the central hot source when viewed edge on. In novae, the accretion disc may have been destroyed during the initial explosion but could have reformed by the time of the SSS phase. In addition, clumpy ejecta may lead to temporary obscuration events. The emission lines originate from reprocessed emission in the accretion disc, its wind or further out in clumpy ejecta while Thomson scattering allows continuum emission to be visible also during total obscuration of the central hot source.
  • STARLIB is a next-generation, all-purpose nuclear reaction-rate library. For the first time, this library provides the rate probability density at all temperature grid points for convenient implementation in models of stellar phenomena. The recommended rate and its associated uncertainties are also included. Currently, uncertainties are absent from all other rate libraries, and, although estimates have been attempted in previous evaluations and compilations, these are generally not based on rigorous statistical definitions. A common standard for deriving uncertainties is clearly warranted. STARLIB represents a first step in addressing this deficiency by providing a tabular, up-to-date database that supplies not only the rate and its uncertainty but also its distribution. Because a majority of rates are lognormally distributed, this allows the construction of rate probability densities from the columns of STARLIB. This structure is based on a recently suggested Monte Carlo method to calculate reaction rates, where uncertainties are rigorously defined. In STARLIB, experimental rates are supplemented with: (i) theoretical TALYS rates for reactions for which no experimental input is available, and (ii) laboratory and theoretical weak rates. STARLIB includes all types of reactions of astrophysical interest to Z = 83, such as (p,g), (p,a), (a,n), and corresponding reverse rates. Strong rates account for thermal target excitations. Here, we summarize our Monte Carlo formalism, introduce the library, compare methods of correcting rates for stellar environments, and discuss how to implement our library in Monte Carlo nucleosynthesis studies. We also present a method for accessing STARLIB on the Internet and outline updated Monte Carlo-based rates.
  • We report the Suzaku detection of the earliest X-ray eclipse seen in the recurrent nova U Scorpii 2010. A target-of-opportunity observation 15 days after the outburst found a 27+/-5% dimming in the 0.2-1.0 keV energy band at the predicted center of an eclipse. In comparison with the X-ray eclipse depths seen at two later epochs by XMM-Newton, the source region shrank by about 10-20% between days 15 and 35 after the outburst. The X-ray eclipses appear to be deeper than or similar to contemporaneous optical eclipses, suggesting the X-ray and optical source region extents are comparable on day 15. We raise the possibility of the energy dependency in the photon escape regions, and that this would be a result of the supersoft X-ray opacity being higher than the Thomson scattering optical opacity at the photosphere due to bound-free transitions in abundant metals that are not fully ionized. Assuming a spherically symmetric explosion model, we constrain the mass-loss rate as a function of time. For a ratio of actual to Thomson opacity of 10-100 in supersoft X-rays, we find a total ejecta mass of about 10^{-7}-10^{-6} M_{\odot}.
  • Novae are cataclysmic variable binary systems in which a white dwarf primary is accreting material from a low mass companion. The importance of this accretion takes on added significance if the WD can increase its mass to reach the Chandrasekhar limit thus exploding as a Type Ia supernova. In this study we accrete material of Solar composition onto carbon-oxygen white dwarfs of 0.70, 1.00 and 1.35 Msun with accretion rates from 1.6e-10 to 1.6e-6 Msun per yr. We have utilized the MESA stellar evolution code for our modeling and evolve them for many nova cycles or, in some cases, evolution to a red giant stage. Differing behaviors occur as a function of both the WD mass and the accretion rate. For the lower WD masses, the models undergo recurrent hydrogen flashes at low accretion rates; for higher accretion rates, steady-burning of hydrogen occurs and eventually gives way to recurrent hydrogen flashes. At the highest accretion rates, these models go through a steady-burning phase but eventually transition into red giants. For the highest white dwarf mass recurrent hydrogen flashes occur at lower accretion rates but for higher rates the models exhibit steady-burning interspersed with helium flashes. We find that for all our models that undergo recurrent hydrogen flashes, as well as the steady-burning models that exhibit helium flashes, the mass of the WD continues to grow toward the Chandrasekhar limit. These results suggest that the accretion of Solar abundance material onto carbon-oxygen white dwarfs in cataclysmic variable systems, the single degenerate scenario, is a viable channel for progenitors of Type Ia supernova explosions.
  • Symbiotic binaries are systems containing white dwarfs (WDs) and red giants. Symbiotic novae are those systems in which thermonuclear eruptions occur on the WD components. These are to be distinguished from events driven by accretion disk instabilities analogous to dwarf novae eruptions in cataclysmic variable outbursts. Another class of symbiotic systems are those in which the WD is extremely luminous and it seems likely that quiescent nuclear burning is ongoing on the accreting WD. A fundamental question is the secular evolution of the WD. Do the repeated outbursts or quiescent burning in these accreting systems cause the WD to gain or lose mass? If it is gaining mass, can it eventually reach the Chandrasekhar Limit and become a supernova (a SN Ia if it can hide the hydrogen and helium in the system)? In order to better understand these systems, we have begun a new study of the evolution of Thermonuclear Runaways (TNRs) in the accreted envelopes of WDs using a variety of initial WD masses, luminosities and mass accretion rates. We use our 1-D hydro code, NOVA, which includes the new convective algorithm of Arnett, Meakin and Young, the Hix and Thielemann nuclear reaction solver, the Iliadis reaction rate library, the Timmes equation of state, and the OPAL opacities. We assume a solar composition (Lodders abundance distribution) and do not allow any mixing of accreted material with core material. This assumption strongly influences our results. We report here (1) that the WD grows in mass for all simulations so that canonical `steady burning' does not occur, and (2) that only a small fraction of the accreted matter is ejected in some (but not all) simulations. We also find that the accreting systems, before thermonuclear runaway, are too cool to be seen in X-ray searches for SN Ia progenitors.
  • We continue our study of the physical properties of the recurrent nova T Pyx, focussing on the structure of the ejecta in the nebular stage of expansion during the 2011 outburst. The nova was observed contemporaneously with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), at high resolution spectroscopic resolution (R ~ 65000) on 2011 Oct. 11 and 2012 Apr. 8 (without absolute flux calibration), and with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope, at high resolution (R ~ 30000) on 2011 Oct. 10 and 2012 Mar. 28 (absolute fluxes). We use standard plasma diagnostics (e.g. [O III] and [N II] line ratios and the H$\beta$ line fluxes) to constrain electron densities and temperatures. Using Monte Carlo modeling of the ejecta, we derive the structure and filling factor from comparisons to the optical and ultraviolet line profiles. The ejecta can be modeled using an axisymmetric conical -- bipolar -- geometry with a low inclination of the axis to the line of sight, i=15+/-5 degrees, compatible with published results from high angular resolution optical spectro-interferometry. The structure is similar to that observed in the other short orbital period recurrent novae during their nebular stages. We show that the electron density scales as $t^{-3}$ as expected from a ballistically ejected constant mass shell; there is no need to invoke a continuing mass outflow following the eruption. The derived mass for the ejecta with filling factor f ~ 3%, M_ej ~ 2E-6$M_sun is similar to that obtained for other recurrent nova ejecta but inconsistent with the previously reported extended optically thick epoch of the explosion. We suggest that the system underwent a common envelope phase following the explosion that produced the recombination event. Implications for the dynamics of the recurrent novae are discussed. (truncated)
  • We present a brief summary of the Single Degenerate Scenario for the progenitors of Type Ia Supernovae in which it is assumed that a low mass carbon-oxygen white dwarf is growing in mass as a result of accretion from a secondary star in a close binary system. Recent hydrodynamic simulations of accretion of solar material onto white dwarfs without mixing always produce a thermonuclear runaway and steady burning does not occur. For a broad range in WD mass (0.4 Solar masses to 1.35 Solar Masses), the maximum ejected material occurs for the 1.25 Solar Mass sequences and then decreases as the white dwarf mass decreases. Therefore, the white dwarfs are growing in mass as a consequence of the accretion of solar material and as long as there is no mixing of accreted material with core material. In contrast, a thermonuclear runaway in the accreted hydrogen-rich layers on the low luminosity WDs in close binary systems where mixing of core matter with accreted material has occurred is the outburst mechanism for Classical, Recurrent, and Symbiotic novae. The differences in characteristics of these systems is likely the WD mass and mass accretion rate. The high levels of enrichment of CN ejecta in elements ranging from carbon to sulfur confirm that there is dredge-up of matter from the core of the WD and enable them to contribute to the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium. Therefore, studies of CNe can lead to an improved understanding of Galactic nucleosynthesis, some sources of pre-solar grains, and the Extragalactic distance scale. The characteristics of the outburst depend on the white dwarf mass, luminosity, mass accretion rate, and the chemical composition of both the accreting material and WD material. The properties of the outburst also depends on when, how, and if the accreted layers are mixed with the WD core and the mixing mechanism is still unknown.
  • We present infrared spectra of the binary XX Oph obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The data show some evidence for the presence of solid C_60 - the first detection of C_60 in the solid phase - together with the well-known ``Unidentified Infrared'' emission features. We suggest that, in the case of XX Oph, the C_60 is located close to the hot component, and that in general it is preferentially excited by stars having effective temperatures in the range 15,000-30,000K. C_60 may be common in circumstellar environments, but un-noticed in the absence of a suitable exciting source.
  • The 10th recorded outburst of the recurrent eclipsing nova USco was observed simultaneously in X-ray, UV, and optical by XMM-Newton on days 22.9 and 34.9 after outburst. Two full passages of the companion in front of the nova ejecta were observed, witnessing the reformation of the accretion disk. On day 22.9, we observed smooth eclipses in UV and optical but deep dips in the X-ray light curve which disappeared by day 34.9, then yielding clean eclipses in all bands. X-ray dips can be caused by clumpy absorbing material that intersects the line of sight while moving along highly elliptical trajectories. Cold material from the companion could explain the absence of dips in UV and optical light. The disappearance of X-ray dips before day 34.9 implies significant progress in the formation of the disk. The X-ray spectra contain photospheric continuum emission plus strong emission lines, but no clear absorption lines. Both continuum and emission lines in the X-ray spectra indicate a temperature increase from day 22.9 to day 34.9. We find clear evidence in the spectra and light curves for Thompson scattering of the photospheric emission from the white dwarf. Photospheric absorption lines can be smeared out during scattering in a plasma of fast electrons. We also find spectral signatures of resonant line scattering that lead to the observation of the strong emission lines. Their dominance could be a general phenomenon in high-inclination systems such as Cal87.
  • We here report on multiwavelength (X-ray to optical) followup observations of carbon star CGCS 5926. These were motivated by the fact that this star is positionally coincident with a faint X-ray emitting object belonging to the ROSAT catalog of sources, thus suggesting a possible symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) nature for it. Our spectrophotometric optical data confirm the giant carbon star nature of the object and allow us to classify its spectral type as C(6,2). This classification places CGCS 5926 at a distance of about 5 kpc from Earth. BVRcIc photometry of the star shows that it displays a variability of about 0.3 mag on timescales of months, with the star getting bluer when its brightness increases. Our photometric data indicate a periodicity of 151 days, which we explain as due to radial pulsations of CGCS 5926 on the basis of its global characteristics. The source is not detected at X-rays with Swift/XRT down to a 0.3-10 keV band luminosity of around 3e32 erg/s. This nondetection is apparently in contrast with the ROSAT data; however we show that, even if the probability that CGCS 5926 can be a SyXB appears quite low, the present information does not completely rule out such a possibility, while it makes other interpretations even more unlikely if we assume that the ROSAT detection was real. This issue might thus be settled by future, more sensitive, observations at high energies.
  • The March 2011 outburst of the poorly-studied cataclysmic variable NSV 1436 offered an opportunity to decide between dwarf nova and recurrent nova classifications. We use seven daily observations in the X-ray and UV by the Swift satellite, together with AAVSO V photometry, to characterise the outburst and decline behaviour. The short optical outburst coincided with a faint and relatively soft X-ray state, whereas in decline to fainter optical magnitudes the X-ray source was harder and brighter. These attributes, and the modest optical outburst amplitude, indicate that this was a dwarf nova outburst and not a recurrent nova. The rapid optical fading suggests an orbital period below 2 hours.
  • Two XMM observations of the fast classical nova V2491Cyg were carried out on days 39.93 and 49.62 after discovery, during the supersoft source (SSS) phase, yielding simultaneous X-ray and UV light curves and high-resolution X-ray spectra. The first X-ray light curve is highly variable with periodic oscillations (37.2 min) after an extended dip of factor of three lasting ~3 hours. The cause of the dip is currently unexplained and could have the same origin as similar events in V4743Sgr and RSOph, as it occurred on the same time scale. The 37-min period is not present during the dip and also not in the second observation. The UV light curves are variable but contain no dips and no period. High-resolution X-ray spectra are presented for 4 intervals of different intensity. All spectra are atmospheric continua with absorption lines and absorption edges. Interstellar lines of OI and NI are seen at their rest wavelengths, and a large number of high-ionization absorption lines are found at blue shifts indicating an expansion velocity of 3000-3400 km/s, which does not change significantly during the epochs of observation. Comparisons with the slower nova V4743Sgr and the symbiotic recurrent nova RSOph are presented. The SSS spectrum of V4743Sgr is much softer with broader and more complex photospheric absorption lines. Meanwhile, the absorption lines in RSOph are as narrow as in V2491Cyg, but they are less blue shifted. A remarkable similarity in the continua of V2491Cyg and RSOph is found. The only differences are smaller line shifts and additional emission lines in RSOph that are related to a dense stellar wind from the evolved companion. Three unidentified absorption lines are present in the X-ray spectra of all three novae, with rest wavelengths 26.05AA, 29.45AA, and 30.0AA. No satisfactory spectral model is currently available for the soft X-ray spectra of novae in outburst.
  • Swift X-ray observations of the ~60 day super-soft phase of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi 2006 show the progress of nuclear burning on the white dwarf in exquisite detail. First seen 26 days after the optical outburst, this phase started with extreme variability likely due to variable absorption, although intrinsic white dwarf variations are not excluded. About 32 days later, a steady decline in count-rate set in. NLTE model atmosphere spectral fits during the super-soft phase show that the effective temperature of the white dwarf increases from ~65 eV to ~90 eV during the extreme variability phase, falling slowly after about day 60 and more rapidly after day 80. The bolometric luminosity is seen to be approximately constant and close to Eddington from day 45 up to day 60, the subsequent decline possibly signalling the end of extensive nuclear burning. Before the decline, a multiply-periodic, ~35 s modulation of the soft X-rays was present and may be the signature of a nuclear fusion driven instability. Our measurements are consistent with a white dwarf mass near the Chandrasekhar limit; combined with a deduced accumulation of mass transferred from its binary companion, this leads us to suggest RS Oph is a strong candidate for a future supernova explosion. The main uncertainty now is whether the WD is the CO type necessary for a SN Ia. This may be confirmed by detailed abundance analyses of spectroscopic data from the outbursts.