• We outline the prospects for performing pioneering radio weak gravitational lensing analyses using observations from a potential forthcoming JVLA Sky Survey program. A large-scale survey with the JVLA can offer interesting and unique opportunities for performing weak lensing studies in the radio band, a field which has until now been the preserve of optical telescopes. In particular, the JVLA has the capacity for large, deep radio surveys with relatively high angular resolution, which are the key characteristics required for a successful weak lensing study. We highlight the potential advantages and unique aspects of performing weak lensing in the radio band. In particular, the inclusion of continuum polarisation information can greatly reduce noise in weak lensing reconstructions and can also remove the effects of intrinsic galaxy alignments, the key astrophysical systematic effect that limits weak lensing at all wavelengths. We identify a VLASS "deep fields" program (total area ~10-20 square degs), to be conducted at L-band and with high-resolution (A-array configuration), as the optimal survey strategy from the point of view of weak lensing science. Such a survey will build on the unique strengths of the JVLA and will remain unsurpassed in terms of its combination of resolution and sensitivity until the advent of the Square Kilometre Array. We identify the best fields on the JVLA-accessible sky from the point of view of overlapping with existing deep optical and near infra-red data which will provide crucial redshift information and facilitate a host of additional compelling multi-wavelength science.
  • The CORNISH project is the highest resolution radio continuum survey of the Galactic plane to date. It is the 5 GHz radio continuum part of a series of multi-wavelength surveys that focus on the northern GLIMPSE region (10 deg < l < 65 deg), observed by the Spitzer satellite in the mid-infrared. Observations with the Very Large Array in B and BnA configurations have yielded a 1.5" resolution Stokes I map with a root-mean-squared noise level better than 0.4 mJy/beam. Here we describe the data-processing methods and data characteristics, and present a new, uniform catalogue of compact radio-emission. This includes an implementation of automatic deconvolution that provides much more reliable imaging than standard CLEANing. A rigorous investigation of the noise characteristics and reliability of source detection has been carried out. We show that the survey is optimised to detect emission on size scales up to 14" and for unresolved sources the catalogue is more than 90 percent complete at a flux density of 3.9 mJy. We have detected 3,062 sources above a 7-sigma detection limit and present their ensemble properties. The catalogue is highly reliable away from regions containing poorly-sampled extended emission, which comprise less than two percent of the survey area. Imaging problems have been mitigated by down-weighting the shortest spacings and potential artefacts flagged via a rigorous manual inspection with reference to the Spitzer infrared data. We present images of the most common source types found: regions, planetary nebulae and radio-galaxies. The CORNISH data and catalogue are available online at http://cornish.leeds.ac.uk
  • We describe the motivation, design and implementation of the CORNISH survey, an arcsecond resolution radio continuum survey of the inner Galactic plane at 5 GHz using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). It is a blind survey co-ordinated with the northern Spitzer GLIMPSE I region covering 10 deg < l < 65 deg and |b| < 1 deg at similar resolution. We discuss in detail the strategy that we employed to control the shape of the synthesised beam across this survey that covers a wide range of fairly low declinations. Two snapshots separated by 4 hours in hour angle kept the beam elongation to less that 1.5 over 75% of the survey area and less than 2 over 98% of the survey. The prime scientific motivation is to provide an unbiased survey for ultra-compact HII regions to study this key phase in massive star formation. A sensitivity around 2 mJy will allow the automatic distinction between radio loud and quiet mid-IR sources found in the Spitzer surveys. This survey has many legacy applications beyond star formation including evolved stars, active stars and binaries, and extragalactic sources. The CORNISH survey for compact ionized sources complements other Galactic plane surveys that target diffuse and non-thermal sources as well as atomic and molecular phases to build up a complete picture of the ISM in the Galaxy.
  • The high star formation rates of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) make them ideal places for core-collapse supernova (CCSN) searches. At radio frequencies, free from dust extinction, it is possible to detect compact components within the innermost LIRG nuclear regions, such as SNe and SN remnants, as well as AGN buried deep in the LIRG nuclei. We studied the LIRG IC883 aiming at: (i) investigating its (circum-)nuclear regions using the e-EVN at 5GHz, and e-MERLIN at 6.9GHz, complemented by archival VLBI data; (ii) detecting at radio frequencies the two recently reported circumnuclear SNe 2010cu and 2011hi, which were discovered by near-IR (NIR) adaptive optics observations of IC883; and (iii) further investigating the nature of SN2011hi at NIR by means of observations with Gemini-North. The circumnuclear regions traced by e-MERLIN at 6.9GHz have an extension of ~1kpc, and show a striking double-sided structure, which very likely corresponds to a warped rotating ring, in agreement with previous studies. Our e-EVN observations at 5GHz and complementary archival VLBI data at 5GHz and 8.4GHz, reveal the presence of various milliarcsec compact components in the nucleus of IC883. A single compact source, an AGN candidate, dominates the emission at both nuclear and circumnuclear scales, as imaged with the e-EVN and e-MERLIN, respectively. The other milliarcsec components are very suggestive of ongoing nuclear CCSN activity. Our e-EVN observations also resulted in upper limits to the radio luminosity of the two SNe in IC883 recently discovered at NIR. We refine the classification of SN2011hi as a Type IIP SN according to our latest Gemini-North epoch from 2012, in agreement with a low-luminosity radio SN nature. We estimate a CCSN rate lower limit of 1.1_{-0.6}^{+1.3} yr^{-1} for the entire galaxy, based on three nuclear radio SNe and the circumnuclear SNe 2010cu and 2011hi. (abridged)
  • The benefits for the e-MERLIN and EVN arrays of using antennae at the satellite communication station at Goonhilly in Cornwall are discussed. The location of this site - new to astronomy - will provide an almost equal distribution of long baselines in the east-west- and north-south directions, and opens up the possibility to get significantly improved observations of equatorial fields with e-MERLIN. These additional baselines will improve the sensitivity on a set of critical spatial scales and will increase the angular resolution of e-MERLIN by a factor of two. e-MERLIN observations, including many allocated under the e-MERLIN Legacy programme, will benefit from the enhanced angular resolution and imaging capability especially for sources close to or below the celestial equator (where ESO facilities such as ALMA will operate) of including the Goonhilly telescopes. Furthermore, the baselines formed between Goonhilly and the existing stations will close the gap between the baselines of e-MERLIN and those of the European VLBI Network (EVN) and therefore enhance the legacy value of e-MERLIN datasets.
  • A consortium of universities has recently been formed with the goal of using the decommissioned telecommunications infrastructure at the Goonhilly Earth Station in Cornwall, UK, for astronomical purposes. One particular goal is the introduction of one or more of the ~30-metre parabolic antennas into the existing e-MERLIN radio interferometer. This article introduces this scheme and presents some simulations which quantify the improvements that would be brought to the e-MERLIN system. These include an approximate doubling of the spatial resolution of the array, an increase in its N-S extent with strong implications for imaging the most well-studied equatorial fields, accessible to ESO facilities including ALMA. It also increases the overlap between the e-MERLIN array and the European VLBI Network. We also discuss briefly some niche science areas in which an e-MERLIN array which included a receptor at Goonhilly would be potentially world-leading, in addition to enhancing the existing potential of e-MERLIN in its role as a Square Kilometer Array pathfinder instrument.
  • A 10-arcmin field around the HDF(N) contains 92 radio sources >40 uJy, resolved by MERLIN+VLA at 0".2-2".0 resolution. 55 have Chandra X-ray counterparts including 18 with a hard X-ray photon index and high luminosity characteristic of a type-II (obscured) AGN. >70% of the radio sources have been classified as starbursts or AGN using radio morphologies, spectral indices and comparisons with optical appearance and MIR emission. Starbursts outnumber radio AGN 3:1. This study extends the VO methods previously used to identify X-ray-selected obscured type-II AGN to investigate whether very luminous radio and X-ray emission originates from different phenomena in the same galaxy. The high-redshift starbursts have typical sizes of 5--10 kpc and star formation rates of ~1000 Msun/yr. There is no correlation between radio and X-ray luminosities nor spectral indices at z>~1.3. ~70% of both the radio-selected AGN and the starburst samples were detected by Chandra. The X-ray luminosity indicates the presence of an AGN in at least half of the 45 cross-matched radio starbursts, of which 11 are type-II AGN including 7 at z>1.5. This distribution overlaps closely with the X-ray detected radio sources which were also detected by SCUBA. Stacked 1.4-GHz emission at the positions of radio-faint X-ray sources is correlated with X-ray hardness. Most extended radio starbursts at z>1.3 host X-ray selected obscured AGN. Radio emission from most of these ultra-luminous objects is dominated by star formation but it contributes less than 1/3 of their X-ray luminosity. Our results support the inferences from SCUBA and IR data, that at z>1.5, star formation is an order of magnitude more extended and more copious, it is closely linked to AGN activity and it is triggered differently, compared with star formation at lower redshifts.
  • We use Virtual Observatory methods to investigate the association between radio and X-ray emission at high redshifts. Fifty-five of the 92 HDF(N) sources resolved by combining MERLIN+VLA data were detected by Chandra, of which 18 are hard enough and bright enough to be obscured AGN. The high-z population of microJy radio sources is dominated by starbursts an order of magnitude more active and more extended than any found at z<1 and at least a quarter of these simultaneously host highly X-ray-luminous obscured AGN.
  • Nova outbursts take place in binary star systems comprising a white dwarf and either a low-mass Sun-like star or, as in the case of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi, a red giant. Although the cause of these outbursts is known to be thermonuclear explosion of matter transferred from the companion onto the surface of the white dwarf, models of the previous (1985) outburst of RS Ophiuchi failed to adequately fit the X-ray evolution and there was controversy over a single-epoch high-resolution radio image, which suggested that the remnant was bipolar rather than spherical as modelled. Here we report the detection of spatially resolved structure in RS Ophiuchi from two weeks after its 12 February 2006 outburst. We track an expanding shock wave as it sweeps through the red giant wind, producing a remnant similar to that of a type II supernova but evolving over months rather than millennia. As in supernova remnants, the radio emission is non-thermal (synchrotron emission), but asymmetries and multiple emission components clearly demonstrate that contrary to the assumptions of spherical symmetry in models of the 1985 explosion, the ejection is jet-like, collimated by the central binary whose orientation on the sky can be determined from these observations.
  • Observations with MERLIN at 408 MHz have been used to establish the low-frequency part of the spectra of more than a hundred compact radio sources taken from the part of the Jodrell Bank--VLA Astrometric Survey limited by 35 deg. < \delta < 75 deg. These sources were selected from JVAS and other catalogues to have convex spectra between 1.4 and 8.4 GHz, characteristic of Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) sources. We have confirmed convex shapes of the spectra of 76 objects (one half of our initial candidates) thereby yielding the largest genuine sample of GPS sources compiled so far. Seven of 17 identified quasars in the sample have large ($z\ga 2$) redshifts.
  • High resolution, deep radio images are presented for two distant radio galaxies, 3C324 (z=1.206) and 3C368 (z=1.132), which are both prime examples of the radio-optical alignment effect seen in powerful radio galaxies with redshifts z > 0.6. Radio observations were made using the Very Large Array in A-array configuration at 5 and 8 GHz, and using the MERLIN array at 1.4 and 1.65 GHz. Radio spectral index, radio polarisation, and rotation measure maps are presented for both sources. Radio core candidates are detected in each source, and by aligning these with the centroid of the infrared emission the radio and the optical/infrared images can be related astrometrically with 0.1 arcsec accuracy. In each source the radio core is located at a minimum of the optical emission, probably associated with a central dust lane. Both sources also exhibit radio jets which lie along the directions of the bright strings of optical knots seen in high resolution Hubble Space Telescope images. The northern arm of 3C368 shows a close correlation between the radio and optical emission, whilst along the jet direction of 3C324 the bright radio and optical knots are co-linear but not co-spatial. These indicate that interactions between the radio jet and its environment play a key role in producing the excess ultraviolet emission of these sources, but that the detailed mechanisms vary from source to source. 3C368 is strongly depolarised and has an average rest-frame rotation measure of a few hundred rad/m^2, reaching about 1000 rad/m^2 close to the most depolarised regions. 3C324 has weaker depolarisation, and an average rest-frame rotation measure of between 100 and 200 rad/m^2. Both sources show large gradients in their rotation measure structures, with variations of up to 1000 rad/m^2 over distances of about 10 kpc.
  • We present red and blue images of the jet of the quasar 3C273 obtained with the WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope as well as a new radio map made with the MERLIN array. The images are of significantly better quality than that of previous data. The two maps are aligned to an accuracy of 0.020$''$; this accuracy is achieved because both the quasar and the jet are contained in both the radio and optical images. The start of the optical jet is marked by an elongated knot which appears identical at radio and optical wavelengths. Other knots in the optical jet correspond to narrow oblique features within the radio outline. The total width of the smooth emission in the optical jet is~$0.7''$; the FWHM of the optical knots is~$0.3''$. The knots may trace the current location of a narrow, perhaps helical jet lying within the outlines of the older radio cocoon.