• Context. Convection is a candidate to explain the trigger of red supergiant star mass loss. Owing to the small size of the convective cells on the photosphere, few of their characteristics are known. Aims. Using near infrared interferometry, we intend to resolve the photosphere of red supergiant stars and to bring new constraints on their modeling. Methods. We observed the nearby red supergiant Antares using the 4-telescope instrument VLTI/PIONIER. We collected data on the three available configurations of the 1.8m telescopes in the H band. Results. We obtained unprecedented angular resolution on the disk of a star (6% of the star angular diameter) that limits the mean size of convective cells, brings new constraints on numerical simulations. Using an analytical model with a distribution of bright spots we determine their effect on the visibility signal. Conclusion. We determine that the interferometric signal on Antares is compatible with convective cells with various sizes from 45% to 5% of the angular diameter. We also conclude that convective cells can strongly affect the angular diameter and limb-darkening measurements. In particular, the apparent angular diameter becomes dependent on the sampled position angles.
  • We report the results of high-angular-resolution observations that search for exozodiacal light in a sample of main sequence stars and sub-giants. Using the "jouvence" of the fiber linked unit for optical recombination (JouFLU) at the center for high angular resolution astronomy (CHARA) telescope array, we have observed a total of 44 stars. Out of the 44 stars, 33 are new stars added to the initial, previously published survey of 42 stars performed at CHARA with the fiber linked unit for optical recombiation (FLUOR). Since the start of the survey extension, we have detected a K-band circumstellar excess for six new stars at the ~ 1\% level or higher, four of which are known or candidate binaries, and two for which the excess could be attributed to exozodiacal dust. We have also performed follow-up observations of 11 of the stars observed in the previously published survey and found generally consistent results. We do however detect a significantly larger excess on three of these follow-up targets: Altair, $\upsilon$ And and $\kappa$ CrB. Interestingly, the last two are known exoplanet host stars. We perform a statistical analysis of the JouFLU and FLUOR samples combined, which yields an overall exozodi detection rate of $21.7^{+5.7}_{-4.1}\%$. We also find that the K-band excess in FGK-type stars correlates with the existence of an outer reservoir of cold ($\lesssim 100\,$K) dust at the $99\%$ confidence level, while the same cannot be said for A-type stars.
  • Context. The mass-loss mechanism of cool massive evolved stars is poorly understood. The proximity of Betelgeuse makes it an appealing target to study its atmosphere, map the shape of its envelope, and follow the structure of its wind from the photosphere out to the interstellar medium. Aims. A link is suspected between the powerful convective motions in Betelgeuse and its mass loss. We aim to constrain the spatial structure and temporal evolution of the convective pattern on the photosphere and to search for evidence of this link. Methods. We report new interferometric observations in the infrared H band using the VLTI/PIONIER instrument. We monitored the photosphere of Betelgeuse between 2012 January and 2014 November to look for evolutions that may trigger the outflow. Results. Our interferometric observations at low spatial frequencies are compatible with the presence of a hot spot on the photosphere that has a characteristic width of one stellar radius. It appears to be superposed on the smaller scale convective pattern. In the higher spatial frequency domain, we observe a significant difference between the observations and the predictions of 3D hydrodynamical simulations. Conclusions. We bring new evidence for the presence of a convective pattern in the photosphere of red supergiants. The inferred hot spot is probably the top of a giant convection cell although an asymmetric extension of the star cannot be excluded by these interferometric observations alone. The properties of the observed surface features show a stronger contrast and inhomogeneity as predicted by 3D radiative hydrodynamical simulations. We propose that the large observed feature is modifying the signature of the convective pattern at the surface of the star in a way that simulations cannot reproduce.
  • The bright southern star L2 Pup is a particularly prominent asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star, as its distance of 64 pc makes it the nearest of its type. We report new adaptive optics observations of L2 Pup at visible wavelengths with the SPHERE/ZIMPOL instrument of the VLT that confirm the presence of the circumstellar dust disk at high inclination discovered recently by Kervella et al. (2014b). The signature of the three-dimensional structure of the disk is clearly observed in the map of the degree of linear polarization pL. We identify the inner rim of the disk through its polarimetric signature at a radius of 6 AU from the AGB star. The ZIMPOL intensity images in the V and R bands also reveal a close-in secondary source at a projected separation of 2 AU from the primary. The identification of the spectral type of this companion is uncertain due to the strong reddening from the disk, but its photometry suggests that it is a late K giant, of comparable mass to the AGB star. We present refined physical parameters for the dust disk derived using the RADMC-3D radiative transfer code. We also interpret the pL map using a simple polarization model to infer the three-dimensional structure of the envelope. Interactions between the inner binary system and the disk apparently form spiral structures that propagate along the orthogonal axis to the disk to form streamers. Two dust plumes propagating orthogonally to the disk are also detected. They originate in the inner stellar system, and are possibly related to the interaction of the wind of the two stars with the material in the disk. Based on the morphology of the envelope of L2 Pup, we propose that this star is at an early stage of the formation of a bipolar planetary nebula.
  • The physical mechanism through which the outgoing material of massive red supergiants is accelerated above the escape velocity is unclear. Thanks to the transparency of its circumstellar envelope, the nearby red supergiant Betelgeuse gives the opportunity to probe the innermost layers of the envelope of a typical red supergiant down to the photosphere, i.e. where the acceleration of the wind is expected to occur. We took advantage of the SPHERE/ZIMPOL adaptive optics imaging polarimeter to resolve the visible photosphere and close envelope of Betelgeuse. We detect an asymmetric gaseous envelope inside a radius of 2 to 3 times the near-infrared photospheric radius of the star (R*), and a significant Halpha emission mostly contained within 3 R*. From the polarimetric signal, we also identify the signature of dust scattering in an asymmetric and incomplete dust shell located at a similar radius. The presence of dust so close to the star may have a significant impact on the wind acceleration through radiative pressure on the grains. The 3 R* radius emerges as a major interface between the hot gaseous and dusty envelopes. The detected asymmetries strengthen previous indications that the mass loss of Betelgeuse is likely tied to the vigorous convective motions in its atmosphere.
  • We have observed and spatially resolved a set of seven A-type stars in the nearby Ursa Major moving group with the Classic, CLIMB, and PAVO beam combiners on the CHARA Array. At least four of these stars have large rotational velocities ($v \sin i$ $\gtrsim$ 170 $\mathrm{km~s^{-1}}$) and are expected to be oblate. These interferometric measurements, the stars' observed photometric energy distributions, and $v \sin i$ values are used to computationally construct model oblate stars from which stellar properties (inclination, rotational velocity, and the radius and effective temperature as a function of latitude, etc.) are determined. The results are compared with MESA stellar evolution models (Paxton et al. 2011, 2013) to determine masses and ages. The value of this new technique is that it enables the estimation of the fundamental properties of rapidly rotating stars without the need to fully image the star. It can thus be applied to stars with sizes comparable to the interferometric resolution limit as opposed to those that are several times larger than the limit. Under the assumption of coevality, the spread in ages can be used as a test of both the prescription presented here and the MESA evolutionary code for rapidly rotating stars. With our validated technique, we combine these age estimates and determine the age of the moving group to be 414 $\pm$ 23 Myr, which is consistent with, but much more precise than previous estimates.
  • A classical nova occurs when material accreting onto the surface of a white dwarf in a close binary system ignites in a thermonuclear runaway. Complex structures observed in the ejecta at late stages could result from interactions with the companion during the common envelope phase. Alternatively, the explosion could be intrinsically bipolar, resulting from a localized ignition on the surface of the white dwarf or as a consequence of rotational distortion. Studying the structure of novae during the earliest phases is challenging because of the high spatial resolution needed to measure their small sizes. Here we report near-infrared interferometric measurements of the angular size of Nova Delphini 2013, starting from one day after the explosion and continuing with extensive time coverage during the first 43 days. Changes in the apparent expansion rate can be explained by an explosion model consisting of an optically thick core surrounded by a diffuse envelope. The optical depth of the ejected material changes as it expands. We detect an ellipticity in the light distribution, suggesting a prolate or bipolar structure that develops as early as the second day. Combining the angular expansion rate with radial velocity measurements, we derive a geometric distance to the nova of 4.54 +/- 0.59 kpc from the Sun.
  • We present the first high angular resolution observations in the nearinfrared H-band (1.6 microns) of the Luminous Blue Variable star P Cygni. We obtained six-telescope interferometric observations with the CHARA Array and the MIRC beam combiner. These show that the spatial flux distribution is larger than expected for the stellar photosphere. A two component model for the star (uniform disk) plus a halo (two-dimensional Gaussian) yields an excellent fit of the observations, and we suggest that the halo corresponds to flux emitted from the base of the stellar wind. This wind component contributes about 45% of the H-band flux and has an angular FWHM = 0.96 mas, compared to the predicted stellar diameter of 0.41 mas. We show several images reconstructed from the interferometric visibilities and closure phases, and they indicate a generally spherical geometry for the wind. We also obtained near-infrared spectrophotometry of P Cygni from which we derive the flux excess compared to a purely photospheric spectral energy distribution. The H-band flux excess matches that from the wind flux fraction derived from the two component fits to the interferometry. We find evidence of significant near-infrared flux variability over the period from 2006 to 2010 that appears similar to the variations in the H-alpha emission flux from the wind. Future interferometric observations may be capable of recording the spatial variations associated with temporal changes in the wind structure.
  • We report on a high angular resolution survey of circumstellar disks around 24 northern sky Be stars. The K-band continuum survey was made using the CHARA Array long baseline interferometer (baselines of 30 to 331 m). The interferometric visibilities were corrected for the flux contribution of stellar companions in those cases where the Be star is a member of a known binary or multiple system. For those targets with good uv coverage, we used a four parameter Gaussian elliptical disk model to fit the visibilities and to determine the axial ratio, position angle, K-band photospheric flux contribution, and angular diameter of the disk major axis. For the other targets with relatively limited uv coverage, we constrained the axial ratio, inclination angle, and or disk position angle where necessary in order to resolve the degeneracy between possible model solutions. We also made fits of the ultraviolet and infrared spectral energy distributions to estimate the stellar angular diameter and infrared flux excess of each target. The mean ratio of the disk diameter (measured in K-band emission) to stellar diameter (from SED modeling) is 4.4 among the 14 cases where we reliably resolved the disk emission, a value which is generally lower than the disk size ratio measured in the higher opacity Halpha emission line. We estimated the equatorial rotational velocity from the projected rotational velocity and disk inclination for 12 stars, and most of these stars rotate close to or at the critical rotational velocity.
  • Algol (Beta Per) is an extensively studied hierarchical triple system whose inner pair is a prototype semi-detached binary with mass transfer occurring from the sub-giant secondary to the main-sequence primary. We present here the results of our Algol observations made between 2006 and 2010 at the CHARA interferometer with the Michigan Infrared Combiner in the H band. The use of four telescopes with long baselines allows us to achieve better than 0.5 mas resolution and to unambiguously resolve the three stars. The inner and outer orbital elements, as well as the angular sizes and mass ratios for the three components are determined independently from previous studies. We report a significantly improved orbit for the inner stellar pair with the consequence of a 15% change in the primary mass compared to previous studies. We also determine the mutual inclination of the orbits to be much closer to perpendicularity than previously established. State-of-the-art image reconstruction algorithms are used to image the full triple system. In particular an image sequence of 55 distinct phases of the inner pair orbit is reconstructed, clearly showing the Roche-lobe-filling secondary revolving around the primary, with several epochs corresponding to the primary and secondary eclipses.
  • \gamma Cas is the prototypical classical Be star and is best known for its variable hard X-ray emission. To elucidate the reasons for this emission, we mounted a multiwavelength campaign in 2010 centered around 4 XMM observations. The observational techniques included long baseline optical interferometry (LBOI), monitoring by an Automated Photometric Telescope and Halpha observations. Because gamma Cas is also known to be in a binary, we measured Halpha radial velocities and redetermined its period as 203.55+/-0.2 days and an eccentricity near zero. The LBOI observations suggest that the star's decretion disk was axisymmetric in 2010, has an inclination angle near 45^o, and a larger radius than previously reported. The Be star began an "outburst" at the beginning of our campaign, made visible by a disk brightening and reddening during our campaign. Our analyses of the new high resolution spectra disclosed many attributes found from spectra obtained in 2001 (Chandra) and 2004 (XMM). As well as a dominant hot 14 keV thermal component, these familiar ones included: (i) a fluorescent feature of Fe K stronger than observed at previous times, (ii) strong lines of N VII and Ne XI lines indicative of overabundances, and (iii) a subsolar Fe abundance from K-shell lines but a solar abundance from L-shell ions. We also found that 2 absorption columns are required to fit the continuum. While the first one maintained its historical average of 1X10^21 cm^-2, the second was very large and doubled to 7.4X10^23 cm^-2 during our X-ray observations. Although we found no clear relation between this column density and orbital phase, it correlates well with the disk brightening and reddening both in the 2010 and earlier observations. Thus, the inference from this study is that much (perhaps all?) of the X-ray emission from this source originates behind matter ejected by gamma Cas into our line of sight.
  • We present the first N-band nulling plus K- and L-band V2 observations of a young stellar object, MWC325, taken with the 85 m baseline Keck Interferometer. The Keck nuller was designed for the study of faint dust signatures associated with debris disks, but it also has a unique capability for studying the temperature and density distribution of denser disks found around young stellar objects. Interferometric observations of MWC 325 at K, L and N encompass a factor of five in spectral range and thus, especially when spectrally dispersed within each band, enable characterization of the structure of the inner disk regions where planets form. Fitting our observations with geometric models such as a uniform disk or a Gaussian disk show that the apparent size increases monotonically with wavelength in the 2-12 um wavelength region, confirming the widely held assumption based on radiative transfer models, now with spatially resolved measurements over broad wavelength range, that disks are extended with a temperature gradient. The effective size is a factor of about 1.3 and 2 larger in the L-band and N-band, respectively, compared to that in the K-band. The existing interferometric measurements and the spectral energy distribution can be reproduced by a flat disk or a weakly-shadowed nearly flat-disk model, with only slight flaring in the outer regions of the disk, consisting of representative "sub-micron" (0.1 um) and "micron" (2 um) grains of a 50:50 ratio of silicate and graphite. This is marked contrast with the disks previously found in other Herbig Ae/Be stars suggesting a wide variety in the disk properties among Herbig Ae/Be stars.
  • Context. The interpretation of stellar pulsations in terms of internal structure depends on the knowledge of the fundamental stellar parameters. Long-base interferometers permit us to determine very accurate stellar radii, which are independent constraints for stellar models that help us to locate the star in the HR diagram. Aims: Using a direct interferometric determination of the angular diameter and advanced three-dimensional (3D) modeling, we derive the radius of the CoRoT target HD 49933 and reduce the global stellar parameter space compatible with seismic data. Methods: The VEGA/CHARA spectro-interferometer is used to measure the angular diameter of the star. A 3D radiative hydrodynamical simulation of the surface is performed to compute the limb darkening and derive a reliable diameter from visibility curves. The other fundamental stellar parameters (mass, age, and Teff) are found by fitting the large and small p-mode frequency separations using a stellar evolution model that includes microscopic diffusion. Results: We obtain a limb-darkened angular diameter of {\theta}LD = 0.445 \pm 0.012 mas. With the Hipparcos parallax, we obtain a radius of R = 1.42 \pm 0.04 Rsun. The corresponding stellar evolution model that fits both large and small frequency separations has a mass of 1.20 \pm 0.08 Msun and an age of 2.7 Gy. The atmospheric parameters are Teff = 6640 \pm 100 K, log g = 4.21 \pm 0.14, and [Fe/H] = -0.38.
  • Direct detection of thermal emission from nearby hot Jupiters has greatly advanced our knowledge of extrasolar planets in recent years. Since hot Jupiter systems can be regarded as analogs of high contrast binaries, ground-based infrared long baseline interferometers have the potential to resolve them and detect their thermal emission with precision closure phase - a method that is immune to the systematic errors induced by the Earth's atmosphere. In this work, we present closure phase studies toward direct detection of nearby hot Jupiters using the CHARA interferometer array outfitted with the MIRC instrument. We carry out closure phase simulations and conduct a large number of observations for the best candidate {\upsion} And. Our experiments suggest the method is feasible with highly stable and precise closure phases. However, we also find much larger systematic errors than expected in the observations, most likely caused by dispersion across different wavelengths. We find that using higher spectral resolution modes (e.g., R=150) can significantly reduce the systematics. By combining all calibrators in an observing run together, we are able to roughly recalibrate the lower spectral resolution data, allowing us to obtain upper limits of the star-planet contrast ratios of {\upsion} And b across the H band. The data also allow us to get a refined stellar radius of 1.625\pm0.011 R\odot. Our best upper limit corresponds to a contrast ratio of 2.1\times10^3:1 with 90% confidence level at 1.52{\mu}m, suggesting that we are starting to have the capability of constraining atmospheric models of hot Jupiters with interferometry. With recent and upcoming improvements of CHARA/MIRC, the prospect of detecting emission from hot Jupiters with closure phases is promising.
  • We present interferometric observations of the Be star Zeta Tau obtained using the MIRC beam combiner at the CHARA Array. We resolved the disk during four epochs in 2007-2009. We fit the data with a geometric model to characterize the circumstellar disk as a skewed elliptical Gaussian and the central Be star as a uniform disk. The visibilities reveal a nearly edge-on disk with a FWHM major axis of ~ 1.8 mas in the H-band. The non-zero closure phases indicate an asymmetry within the disk. Interestingly, when combining our results with previously published interferometric observations of Zeta Tau, we find a correlation between the position angle of the disk and the spectroscopic V/R ratio, suggesting that the tilt of the disk is precessing. This work is part of a multi-year monitoring campaign to investigate the development and outward motion of asymmetric structures in the disks of Be stars.
  • The prospects for using asteroseismology of rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) stars are hampered by the large uncertainty in fundamental stellar parameters. Results in the literature for the effective temperature (Teff) often span a range of 1000 K. Our goal is to reduce systematic errors and improve the Teff calibration of Ap stars based on new interferometric measurements. We obtained long-baseline interferometric observations of beta CrB using the CHARA/FLUOR instrument. To disentangle the flux contributions of the two components of this binary star, we obtained VLT/NACO adaptive optics images. We determined limb darkened angular diameters of 0.699+-0.017 mas for beta CrB A (from interferometry) and 0.415+-0.017 mas for beta CrB B (from surface brightness- color relations), corresponding to radii of 2.63+-0.09 Rsun (3.4 percent uncertainty) and 1.56+-0.07 Rsun (4.5 percent). The combined bolometric flux of the A and B components was determined from satellite UV data, spectrophotometry in the visible and broadband data in the infrared. The flux from the B component constitutes 16+-4 percent of the total flux and was determined by fitting an ATLAS9 model atmosphere to the broad-band NACO J and K magnitudes. Combining the flux of the A component with its measured angular diameter, we determine the effective temperature Teff(A) = 7980+-180 K (2.3 percent). Our new interferometric and imaging data enable a nearly model-independent determination of the effective temperature of beta CrB A. Including our recent study of alpha Cir, we now have direct Teff measurements of two of the brightest roAp stars, providing a strong benchmark for an improved calibration of the Teff scale for Ap stars. This will support the use of potentially strong constraints imposed by asteroseismic studies of roAp stars.
  • We present spatially-resolved K- and L-band spectra (at spectral resolution R = 230 and R = 60, respectively) of MWC 419, a Herbig Ae/Be star. The data were obtained simultaneously with a new configuration of the 85-m baseline Keck Interferometer. Our observations are sensitive to the radial distribution of temperature in the inner region of the disk of MWC 419. We fit the visibility data with both simple geometric and more physical disk models. The geometric models (uniform disk and Gaussian) show that the apparent size increases linearly with wavelength in the 2-4 microns wavelength region, suggesting that the disk is extended with a temperature gradient. A model having a power-law temperature gradient with radius simultaneously fits our interferometric measurements and the spectral energy distribution data from the literature. The slope of the power-law is close to that expected from an optically thick disk. Our spectrally dispersed interferometric measurements include the Br gamma emission line. The measured disk size at and around Br gamma suggests that emitting hydrogen gas is located inside (or within the inner regions) of the dust disk.
  • The GIII red giant star epsilon Oph has been found to exhibit several modes of oscillation by the MOST mission. We interpret the observed frequencies of oscillation in terms of theoretical radial p-mode frequencies of stellar models. Evolutionary models of this star, in both shell H-burning and core He-burning phases of evolution, are constructed using as constraints a combination of measurements from classical ground-based observations (for luminosity, temperature, and chemical composition) and seismic observations from MOST. Radial frequencies of models in either evolutionary phase can reproduce the observed frequency spectrum of epsilon Oph almost equally well. The best-fit models indicate a mass in the range of 1.85 +/- 0.05 Msun with radius of 10.55 +/- 0.15 Rsun. We also obtain an independent estimate of the radius of epsilon Oph using high accuracy interferometric observations in the infrared K' band, using the CHARA/FLUOR instrument. The measured limb darkened disk angular diameter of epsilon Oph is 2.961 +/- 0.007 mas. Together with the Hipparcos parallax, this translates into a photospheric radius of 10.39 +/- 0.07 Rsun. The radius obtained from the asteroseismic analysis matches the interferometric value quite closely even though the radius was not constrained during the modelling.
  • A short review of recent results in long-baseline optical interferometry pertaining to fundamental stellar parameters and the future possibilities this area over the next decade. Included are discussions of accurate stellar masses, links between asteroseismology and interferometry, precise radii and effective temperatures, limb darkening and convection, stellar rotation, and high angular resolution imaging.
  • Using the CHARA Array and the Palomar Testbed Interferometer, the chemically peculiar star $\lambda$ Bo\"{o}tis has been spatially resolved. We have measured the limb darkened angular diameter to be $\theta_{LD} = 0.533\pm0.029$ mas, corresponding to a linear radius of $R_{\star} = 1.70 \pm 0.10 R_\odot$. The measured angular diameter yields an effective temperature for $\lambda$ Boo of $T_{eff} = 8887 \pm 242$ K. Based upon literature surface gravity estimates spanning $\log{(g)} = 4.0-4.2$ $[\rm{cm s}^{-\rm{2}}]$, we have derived a stellar mass range of $M_{\star} = 1.1 - 1.7$ $M_\odot$. For a given surface gravity, the linear radius uncertainty contributes approximately $\sigma(M_\star) = 0.1-0.2 M_\odot$ to the total mass uncertainty. The uncertainty in the mass (i.e., the range of derived masses) is primarily a result of the uncertainty in the surface gravity. The upper bound of our derived mass range ($\log(g)=4.2, M_\star = 1.7\pm0.2 M_\odot$) is consistent with 100-300 MYr solar-metallicity evolutionary models. The mid-range of our derived masses ($\log(g)=4.1, M_\star = 1.3\pm0.2 M_\odot$) is consistent with 2-3 GYr metal-poor evolutionary models. A more definitive surface gravity determination is required to determine a more precise mass for $\lambda$ Boo.
  • We present the first K'-band, long-baseline interferometric observations of the northern Be stars gamma Cas, phi Per, zeta Tau, and kappa Dra. The measurements were made with multiple telescope pairs of the CHARA Array interferometer, and in every case the observations indicate that the circumstellar disks of the targets are resolved. We fit the interferometric visibilities with predictions from a simple disk model that assumes an isothermal gas in Keplerian rotation. We derive fits of the four model parameters (disk base density, radial density exponent, disk normal inclination, and position angle) for each of the targets. The resulting densities are in broad agreement with prior studies of the IR excess flux and the resulting orientations generally agree with those from interferometric H-alpha and continuum polarimetric observations. We find that the angular size of the K' disk emission is smaller than that determined for the H-alpha emission, and we argue that the difference is the result of a larger H-alpha opacity and the relatively larger neutral hydrogen fraction with increasing disk radius. All the targets are known binaries with faint companions, and we find that companions appear to influence the interferometric visibilities in the cases of phi Per and kappa Dra. We also present contemporaneous observations of the H-alpha, H-gamma, and Br-gamma emission lines. Synthetic model profiles of these lines that are based on the same disk inclination and radial density exponent as derived from the CHARA Array observations match the observed emission line strength if the disk base density is reduced by approximately 1.7 dex.
  • Only a handful of debris disks have been imaged up to now. Due to the need for high dynamic range and high angular resolution, very little is known about the inner planetary region, where small amounts of warm dust are expected to be found. We investigate the close neighbourhood of Vega with the help of infrared stellar interferometry and estimate the integrated K-band flux originating from the central 8 AU of the debris disk. We performed precise visibility measurements at both short (~30 m) and long (~150 m) baselines with the FLUOR beam-combiner installed at the CHARA Array (Mt Wilson, California) in order to separately resolve the emissions from the extended debris disk (short baselines) and from the stellar photosphere (long baselines). After revising Vega's K-band angular diameter (3.202+/-0.005 mas), we show that a significant deficit in squared visibility (1.88+/-0.34%) is detected at short baselines with respect to the best-fit uniform disk stellar model. This deficit can be either attributed to the presence of a low-mass stellar companion around Vega, or as the signature of the thermal and scattered emissions from the debris disk. We show that the presence of a close companion is highly unlikely, as well as other possible perturbations (stellar morphology, calibration), and deduce that we have most probably detected the presence of dust in the close neighbourhood of Vega. The resulting flux ratio between the stellar photosphere and the debris disk amounts to 1.29+/-0.19% within the FLUOR field-of-view (~7.8 AU). Finally, we complement our K-band study with archival photometric and interferometric data in order to evaluate the main physical properties of the inner dust disk. The inferred properties suggest that the Vega system could be currently undergoing major dynamical perturbations.
  • We have obtained high-precision interferometric measurements of Vega with the CHARA Array and FLUOR beam combiner in the K' band at projected baselines between 103m and 273m. The measured visibility amplitudes beyond the first lobe are significantly weaker than expected for a slowly rotating star characterized by a single effective temperature and surface gravity. Our measurements, when compared to synthetic visibilities and synthetic spectrophotometry from a Roche-von Zeipel gravity-darkened model atmosphere, provide strong evidence for the model of Vega as a rapidly rotating star viewed very nearly pole-on. Our best fitting model indicates that Vega is rotating at ~91% of its angular break-up rate with an equatorial velocity of 275 km/s. Together with the measured vsin(i), this velocity yields an inclination for the rotation axis of 5 degrees. For this model the pole-to-equator effective temperature difference is 2250 K, a value much larger than previously derived from spectral line analyses. The derived equatorial T_eff of 7900 K indicates Vega's equatorial atmosphere may be convective and provides a possible explanation for the discrepancy. The model has a luminosity of ~37 Lsun, a value 35% lower than Vega's apparent luminosity based on its bolometric flux and parallax, assuming a slowly rotating star. The model luminosity is consistent with the mean absolute magnitude of A0V stars. Our model predicts the spectral energy distribution of Vega as viewed from its equatorial plane; a model which may be employed in radiative models for the surrounding debris disk.
  • We have measured the angular diameters of six M dwarfs with the CHARA Array, a long-baseline optical interferometer located at Mount Wilson Observatory. Spectral types range from M1.0 V to M3.0 V and linear radii from 0.38 to 0.69 Rsun. These results are consistent with the seven other M-dwarf radii measurements from optical interferometry and with those for sixteen stars in eclipsing binary systems. We compare all directly measured M dwarf radii to model predictions and find that current models underestimate the true stellar radii by up to 15-20%. The differences are small among the metal-poor stars but become significantly larger with increasing metallicity. This suggests that theoretical models for low mass stars may be missing some opacity source that alters the computed stellar radii.
  • We present observations of the A7IV-V star Alderamin ($\alpha$ Cep, HR 8162, HD 203280) from the Georgia State University CHARA Array. These infrared interferometric angular size measurements indicate a non-circular projected disk brightness distribution for this known rapid rotator. The interferometric observations are modeled as arising from an elongated rigid atmosphere, with apparent polar and equatorial radii of $r_p=0.6753^{+0.0119}_{-0.0135}$ milliarcseconds (mas) and $r_e=0.8767^{+0.0293}_{-0.0183}$ mas, respectively, for a difference of $201\pm 32$ microarcseconds ($\mu$as), and with an axial ratio of $r_e/r_p =1.298\pm 0.051$. Using the Hipparcos distance of $14.96\pm 0.11$ pc, these angular measures translate to $2.18\pm0.05$ and $2.82\pm0.10$ $R_\odot$. The inclination of Alderamin to the line of sight indicated by this modeling is effectively edge-on ($i=88.2^{+1.8}_{-13.3}$). The star has a true rotational velocity of $283\pm 10$ km/s ($\sim83$% of breakup velocity), and a polar temperature of roughly 8400 K. Significantly, a necessary aspect of this modeling is a determination of the gravity darkening coefficient, which at a value of $\beta=0.084^{+0.026}_{-0.049}$ is consistent with a convective photosphere, as expected for an A7IV-V star. Our detailed characterization of this object allows us to investigate various scenarios for the angular momentum history of Alderamin and the appropriateness of certain stellar evolution models.