• Availability of reliable atomic and molecular opacity tables is essential in a wide variety of astronomical modeling: the solar and stellar interiors, stellar and planetary atmospheres, stellar evolution, pulsating stars, and protoplanetary disks, to name a few. With the advancement of powerful research techniques such as helio-seismology and asteroseismology, solar neutrino-flux measurements, exoplanet survey satellites, three-dimensional hydrodynamic atmospheric simulations (including non-LTE and granulation effects), high-performance computing of atomic and molecular data, and innovative plasma experiments the accuracy and completeness of opacity tables is being taken to an unprecedented level. The goal of the second Workshop on Astrophysical Opacities was to gather opacity data producers and consumers from both the atomic and molecular sectors to contribute to solving outstanding problems and to develop more effective and integrated interfaces. In this review we attempt to summa- rize the discussion at the workshop and propose future directions for opacity research.
  • The Sun is the most constrained and well-studied of all stars. As a consequence, the physical ingredients entering solar models are used as a reference to study all other stars observed in the Universe. However, our understanding of the solar structure is still imperfect, as illustrated by the current debate on the heavy element abundances in the Sun. We wish to provide additional information on the solar structure by carrying out structural inversions of a new physical quantity, a proxy of the entropy of the solar plasma which properties are very sensitive to the temperature gradient below the convective zone. We use new structural kernels to carry out direct inversions of an entropy proxy of the solar plasma and compare the solar structure to various standard solar models built using various opacity tables and chemical abundances. We also link our results to classical tests commonly found in the literature. Our analysis allows us to probe more efficiently the uncertain regions of the solar models, just below the convective zone, paving the way for new in-depth analyses of the Sun taking into account additional physical uncertainties of solar models beyond the specific question of chemical abundances.
  • Solar modulation potential (SMP) reconstructions based on cosmogenic nuclide records reflect changes in the open solar magnetic field and can therefore help us obtain information on the behaviour of the open solar magnetic field over the Holocene period. We aim at comparing the Sun's large-scale magnetic field behaviour over the last three solar cycles with variations in the SMP reconstruction through the Holocene epoch. To achieve these objectives, we use the IntCal13 $^{14}$C data to investigate distinct patterns in the occurrences of grand minima and maxima during the Holocene period. We then check whether these patterns might mimic the recent solar magnetic activity by investigating the evolution of the energy in the Sun's large-scale dipolar magnetic field using the Wilcox Solar Observatory data. The cosmogenic radionuclide data analysis shows that $\sim$71\% of grand maxima during the period from 6600 BC to 1650 AD were followed by a grand minimum. The occurrence characteristics of grand maxima and minima are consistent with the scenario in which the dynamical non-linearity induced by the Lorentz force leads the Sun to act as a relaxation oscillator. This finding implies that the probability for these events to occur is non-uniformly distributed in time, as there is a memory in their driving mechanism, which can be identified via the back reaction of the Lorentz force.
  • Stellar seismology reveals some interior properties of thousands of solar-type stars but the solar seismic sound speed stays puzzling since a decade as it disagrees with the Standard Solar Model (SSM) prediction. One of the explanations of this disagreement may be found in the treatment of the transport of radiation from the solar core to the surface. As the same framework is used for other stars, it is important to check precisely the reliability of the interacting cross sections of photons with each species in order to ensure the energy transport for temperature T > 2 - 10$^6$ K and density $\rho$ > 0.2 g/cm$^3$. In this paper, we propose a new technique to reach the domain of temperature and density found in the solar radiative interior. This technique called the Double Ablation Front (DAF) is based on a high conversion of the laser energy into X-rays thanks to moderated Z material irradiated by laser intensity between 1.5 $\times$ 10$^{15}$ W/cm$^2$ and 4 $\times$ 10$^{15}$ W/cm$^2$. This high conversion creates, in addition to the electronic front a second ablation front in the moderated Z material. Between the two fronts there is a plateau of density and temperature that we exploit to heat a sample of iron or of oxide. The first simulations realized with the hydrodynamic code CHIC show that this technique allows to reach conditions equivalent to half the radiative zone of the Sun with high stability both in time and space. We examine the possibility to measure both iron and oxygen absorption spectra.
  • Solar activity has significantly changed over the last two Schwabe cycles. After a long and deep minimum at the end of Cycle 23, the weaker activity of Cycle 24 contrasts with the previous cycles. In this work, the response of the solar acoustic oscillations to solar activity is used in order to provide insights on the structural and magnetic changes in the sub-surface layers of the Sun during this on-going unusual period of low activity. We analyze 18 years of continuous observations of the solar acoustic oscillations collected by the Sun-as-a-star GOLF instrument onboard the SoHO spacecraft. From the fitted mode frequencies, the temporal variability of the frequency shifts of the radial, dipolar, and quadrupolar modes are studied for different frequency ranges which are sensitive to different layers in the solar sub-surface interior. The low-frequency modes show nearly unchanged frequency shifts between Cycles 23 and 24, with a time evolving signature of the quasi-biennial oscillation, which is particularly visible for the quadrupole component revealing the presence of a complex magnetic structure. The modes at higher frequencies show frequency shifts 30% smaller during Cycle~24, which is in agreement with the decrease observed in the surface activity between Cycles 23 and 24. The analysis of 18 years of GOLF oscillations indicates that the structural and magnetic changes responsible for the frequency shifts remained comparable between Cycle 23 and Cycle 24 in the deeper sub-surface layers below 1400 km as revealed by the low-frequency modes. The frequency shifts of the higher-frequency modes, sensitive to shallower regions, show that Cycle 24 is magnetically weaker in the upper layers of Sun.
  • Sun-as-a-star observations are very important for the study of the conditions within the Sun and in particular for the deep interior where higher degree modes do not penetrate. They are also of significance in this era of dramatic advances in stellar asteroseismology as they are comparable to those measured in other stars by asteroseismic missions such as CoRoT, Kepler, and MOST. More than 17 years of continuous measurements of SoHO and more than 30 years of BiSON observations provide very long data sets of uninterrupted helioseismic observations. In this work, we discuss the present status of all these facilities that continue to provide state- of-the-art measurements and invaluable data to improve our knowledge of the deepest layers of the Sun and its structural changes during the activity cycle.
  • Rotational splittings are currently measured for several main sequence stars and a large number of red giants with the space mission Kepler. This will provide stringent constraints on rotation profiles. Our aim is to obtain seismic constraints on the internal transport and surface loss of angular momentum of oscillating solar-like stars. To this end, we study the evolution of rotational splittings from the pre-main sequence to the red-giant branch for stochastically excited oscillation modes. We modified the evolutionary code CESAM2K to take rotationally induced transport in radiative zones into account. Linear rotational splittings were computed for a sequence of $1.3 M_{\odot}$ models. Rotation profiles were derived from our evolutionary models and eigenfunctions from linear adiabatic oscillation calculations. We find that transport by meridional circulation and shear turbulence yields far too high a core rotation rate for red-giant models compared with recent seismic observations. We discuss several uncertainties in the physical description of stars that could have an impact on the rotation profiles. For instance, we find that the Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instability does not extract enough angular momentum from the core to account for the discrepancy. In contrast, an increase of the horizontal turbulent viscosity by 2 orders of magnitude is able to significantly decrease the central rotation rate on the red-giant branch. Our results indicate that it is possible that the prescription for the horizontal turbulent viscosity largely underestimates its actual value or else a mechanism not included in current stellar models of low mass stars is needed to slow down the rotation in the radiative core of red-giant stars.
  • Manifestations of the solar magnetic activity through periodicities of about 11 and 2 years are now clearly seen in all solar activity indices.In this paper, we add information about the mechanism driving the 2 year period by studying the time and latitudinal properties of acoustic modes that are sensitive probes of the subsurface layers. We use almost 17 years of high quality resolved data provided by the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) to investigate the solar cycle changes in p-mode frequencies for spherical degrees l from 0 to 120 and 1.6 mHz < nu < 3.5 mHz. For both periodic components of solar activity, we locate the origin of the frequency shift in the subsurface layers and put in evidence for a sudden enhancement in amplitude just in the last few hundred kilometers. We also show that, in both cases, the size of the shift increases towards equatorial latitudes and from minimum to maximum of solar activity, but, in agreement with previous findings,the quasi-biennial periodicity (QBP) causes a weaker shift in mode frequencies and a slower enhancement than the one caused by the 11 year cycle. We compare our observational findings with the features predicted by different models that try to explain the origin of this QBP and conclude that the observed propertiescould result from the beating between a dipole and quadrupole magnetic configuration of the dynamo.
  • The solar magnetic activity consists of two periodic components: the main cycle with a period of 11 yr and a shorter cycle with a period of ~2 yrs. The origin of this second periodicity is still not well understood. We use almost 15 yrs of long high quality resolved data provided by the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) to investigate the solar cycle changes in p-mode frequency with spherical degree l=0-120 and in the range 1600muHz < nu < 3500 muHz. For both periodic components of solar magnetic activity our findings locate the origin of the frequency shift in the subsurface layers with a sudden enhancement in the amplitude of the shift in the last few hundred kilometers. We also show that the size of the shift increases towards equatorial latitudes and from minimum to maximum of solar activity. On the other hand, the signatures of the 2 yr cycle differ from the one of the 11 yr cycle in the magnitude of the shift, as the 2 yr cycle causes a weaker shift in mode frequencies and a slower enhancement in the last few hundreds kilometers. Based on these findings we speculate that a possible physical mechanism behind the quasi biennial periodicity (QBP) could be the beating between different dynamo modes (dipole and quadrupole mode)
  • Opacity is an important ingredient of the evolution of stars. The calculation of opacity coefficients is complicated by the fact that the plasma contains partially ionized heavy ions that contribute to opacity dominated by H and He. Up to now, the astrophysical community has greatly benefited from the work of the contributions of Los Alamos [1], Livermore [2] and the Opacity Project (OP) [3]. However unexplained differences of up to 50% in the radiative forces and Rosseland mean values for Fe have been noticed for conditions corresponding to stellar envelopes. Such uncertainty has a real impact on the understanding of pulsating stellar envelopes, on the excitation of modes, and on the identification of the mode frequencies. Temperature and density conditions equivalent to those found in stars can now be produced in laboratory experiments for various atomic species. Recently the photo-absorption spectra of nickel and iron plasmas have been measured during the LULI 2010 campaign, for temperatures between 15 and 40 eV and densities of ~3 mg/cm3. A large theoretical collaboration, the "OPAC", has been formed to prepare these experiments. We present here the set of opacity calculations performed by eight different groups for conditions relevant to the LULI 2010 experiment and to astrophysical stellar envelope conditions.
  • Seismology of stars is strongly developing. To address this question we have formed an international collaboration OPAC to perform specific experimental measurements, compare opacity calculations and improve the opacity calculations in the stellar codes [1]. We consider the following opacity codes: SCO, CASSANDRA, STA, OPAS, LEDCOP, OP, SCO-RCG. Their comparison has shown large differences for Fe and Ni in equivalent conditions of envelopes of type II supernova precursors, temperatures between 15 and 40 eV and densities of a few mg/cm3 [2, 3, 4]. LEDCOP, OPAS, SCO-RCG structure codes and STA give similar results and differ from OP ones for the lower temperatures and for spectral interval values [3]. In this work we discuss the role of Configuration Interaction (CI) and the influence of the number of used configurations. We present and include in the opacity code comparisons new HULLAC-v9 calculations [5, 6] that include full CI. To illustrate the importance of this effect we compare different CI approximations (modes) available in HULLAC-v9 [7]. These results are compared to previous predictions and to experimental data. Differences with OP results are discussed.
  • The knowledge of stellar evolution is evolving quickly thanks to an increased number of opportunities to scrutinize the stellar internal plasma properties by stellar seismology and by 1D and 3D simulations. These new tools help us to introduce the internal dynamical phenomena in stellar modeling. A proper inclusion of these processes supposes a real confidence in the microscopic physics used, partly checked by solar or stellar acoustic modes. In the present paper we first recall which fundamental physics has been recently verified by helioseismology. Then we recall that opacity is an important ingredient of the secular evolution of stars and we point out why it is necessary to measure absorption coefficients and degrees of ionization in the laboratory for some well identified astrophysical conditions. We examine two specific experimental conditions which are accessible to large laser facilities and are suitable to solve some interesting questions of the stellar community: are the solar internal radiative interactions properly estimated and what is the proper role of the opacity in the excitation of the non radial modes in the envelop of the $\beta$ Cephei and the Be stars ? At the end of the paper we point out the difficulties of the experimental approach that we need to overcome.
  • Neutrinos are fundamental particles ubiquitous in the Universe. Their properties remain elusive despite more than 50 years of intense research activity. In this review we remind the reader of the noticeable properties of these particles and of the stakes of the solar neutrino puzzle. The Standard Solar Model triggered persistent efforts in fundamental Physics to predict the solar neutrino fluxes, and its constantly evolving predictions have been regularly compared to the detected neutrino signals. Anticipating that this standard model could not reproduce the internal solar dynamics, a SEismic Solar Model was developed which enriched theoretical neutrino flux predictions with in situ observation of acoustic waves propagating in the Sun. This review reminds the historical steps, from the pioneering Homestake detection, the GALLEX- SAGE captures of the first pp neutrinos and emphasizes the importance of the Superkamiokande and SNO detectors to demonstrate that the solar-emitted electronic neutrinos are partially transformed into other neutrino flavors before reaching the Earth. The success of BOREXINO in detecting the 7 Be neutrino signal justifies the building of a new generation of detectors to measure the entire solar neutrino spectrum. A coherent picture emerged from neutrino physics and helioseismology. Today, new paradigms take shape: determining the masses of neutrinos and the research on the Sun is focusing on the dynamical aspects and on signature of dark matter. The third part of the review is dedicated to this prospect. The understanding of the crucial role of both rotation and magnetism in solar physics benefit from SoHO, SDO, and PICARD space observations. For now, the particle and stellar challenges seem decoupled, but this is only a superficial appearance. The development of asteroseismology shows the far-reaching impact of Neutrino and Stellar Astronomy.
  • The lifetime of solar-like stars, the envelope structure of more massive stars, and stellar acoustic frequencies largely depend on the radiative properties of the stellar plasma. Up to now, these complex quantities have been estimated only theoretically. The development of the powerful tools of helio- and astero- seismology has made it possible to gain insights on the interiors of stars. Consequently, increased emphasis is now placed on knowledge of the monochromatic opacity coefficients. Here we review how these radiative properties play a role, and where they are most important. We then concentrate specifically on the envelopes of $\beta$ Cephei variable stars. We discuss the dispersion of eight different theoretical estimates of the monochromatic opacity spectrum and the challenges we need to face to check these calculations experimentally.
  • Since the detection of the asymptotic properties of the dipole gravity modes in the Sun, the quest to find individual gravity modes has continued. An extensive and deeper analysis of 14 years of continuous GOLF/SoHO observational data, unveils the presence of a pattern of peaks that could be interpreted as individual dipole gravity modes in the frequency range between 60 and 140 microHz, with amplitudes compatible with the latest theoretical predictions. By collapsing the power spectrum we have obtained a quite constant splitting for these patterns in comparison to regions where no g modes were expected. Moreover, the same technique applied to simultaneous VIRGO/SoHO data unveils some common signals between the power spectra of both instruments. Thus, we are able to identify and characterize individual g modes with their central frequencies, amplitudes and splittings allowing to do seismic inversions of the rotation profile inside the solar core. These results open a new light on the physics and dynamics of the solar deep core.
  • Since the detection of the asymptotic properties of the dipole gravity modes in the Sun, the quest to find the individual gravity modes has continued. A deeper analysis of the GOLF/SoHO data unveils the presence of a pattern of peaks that could be interpreted as individual dipole gravity modes. The computed collapsed spectrum -around these candidate modes- uncovers the presence of a quasi constant frequency splitting, in contrast with regions where no g modes are expected in which the collapsogram gives random results. Besides, the same technique applied to VIRGO/SoHO unveils some common signals between both power spectra. Thus, we can identify and characterize the modes, for example, with their central frequency and splittings. This would open the path towards new investigations to better constrain the solar core.
  • We have analyzed data from a multi-site campaign to observe oscillations in the F5 star Procyon. The data consist of high-precision velocities that we obtained over more than three weeks with eleven telescopes. A new method for adjusting the data weights allows us to suppress the sidelobes in the power spectrum. Stacking the power spectrum in a so-called echelle diagram reveals two clear ridges that we identify with even and odd values of the angular degree (l=0 and 2, and l=1 and 3, respectively). We interpret a strong, narrow peak at 446 muHz that lies close to the l=1 ridge as a mode with mixed character. We show that the frequencies of the ridge centroids and their separations are useful diagnostics for asteroseismology. In particular, variations in the large separation appear to indicate a glitch in the sound-speed profile at an acoustic depth of about 1000 s. We list frequencies for 55 modes extracted from the data spanning 20 radial orders, a range comparable to the best solar data, which will provide valuable constraints for theoretical models. A preliminary comparison with published models shows that the offset between observed and calculated frequencies for the radial modes is very different for Procyon than for the Sun and other cool stars. We find the mean lifetime of the modes in Procyon to be 1.29 +0.55/-0.49 days, which is significantly shorter than the 2-4 days seen in the Sun.
  • Jan. 18, 2010 astro-ph.SR
    We present preliminary asteroseismic results from Kepler on three G-type stars. The observations, made at one-minute cadence during the first 33.5d of science operations, reveal high signal-to-noise solar-like oscillation spectra in all three stars: About 20 modes of oscillation may be clearly distinguished in each star. We discuss the appearance of the oscillation spectra, use the frequencies and frequency separations to provide first results on the radii, masses and ages of the stars, and comment in the light of these results on prospects for inference on other solar-type stars that Kepler will observe.
  • Many questions are still open regarding the structure and the dynamics of the solar core. By constraining more this region in the solar evolution models, we can reduce the incertitudes on some physical processes and on momentum transport mechanisms. A first big step was made with the detection of the signature of the dipole-gravity modes in the Sun, giving a hint of a faster rotation rate inside the core. A deeper analysis of the GOLF/SoHO data unveils the presence of a pattern of peaks that could be interpreted as dipole gravity modes. In that case, those modes can be characterized, thus bringing better constraints on the rotation of the core as well as some structural parameters such as the density at these very deep layers of the Sun interior.
  • Over the past 15 years, our knowledge of the interior of the Sun has tremendously progressed by the use of helioseismic measurements. However, to go further in our understanding of the solar core, we need to measure gravity (g) modes. Thanks to the high quality of the Doppler-velocity signal measured by GOLF/SoHO, it has been possible to unveil the signature of the asymptotic properties of the solar g modes, thus obtaining a hint of the rotation rate in the core. However, the quest for the detection of individual g modes is not yet over. In this work, we apply the latest theoretical developments to guide our research using GOLF velocity time series. In contrary to what was thought till now, we are maybe starting to identify individual low-frequency g modes...
  • Context : On its asteroseismic side, the initial run of CoRoT was partly devoted to the solar like star HD49933.The eigenmodes of this F dwarf have been observed with unprecedented accuracy. Aims : We investigate quantitatively the impact of changes in the modeling parameters like mass and composition. More importantly we investigate how a sophisticated physics affects the seismological picture of HD49933. We consider the effects of diffusion, rotation and the changes in convection efficiency. Methods : We use the CESAM stellar evolution code coupled to the ADIPLS adiabatic pulsation package to build secular models and their associated oscillation frequencies. We also exploited the hydrodynamical code STAGGER to perform surface convection calculations. The seismic variables used in this work are : the large frequency separation, the derivative of the surface phase shift,and the eigenfrequencies $\rm \nu_{\ell=0,n=14}$ and $\rm \nu_{\ell=0,n=27}$. Results : Mass and uncertainties on the composition have much larger impacts on the seismic variables we consider than the rotation. The derivative of the surface phase shift is a promising variable for the determination of the helium content. The seismological variables of HD49933 are sensitive to the assumed solar composition and also to the presence of diffusion in the models.
  • The primary challenge of GOLF-NG (Global Oscillations at Low Frequency New Generation) is the detection of the low-frequency solar gravity and acoustic modes, as well as the possibility to measure the high-frequency chromospheric modes. On June 8th 2008, the first sunlight observations with the multichannel resonant GOLF-NG prototype spectrometer were obtained at the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife). The instrument performs integrated (Sun-as-a-star), Doppler velocity measurements, simultaneously at eight different heights in the D1 sodium line profile, corresponding to photospheric and chromospheric layers of the solar atmosphere. In order to study its performances, to validate the conceived strategy, and to estimate the necessary improvements, this prototype has been running on a daily basis over the whole summer of 2008 at the Observatorio del Teide. We present here the results of the first GOLF-NG observations, clearly showing the characteristics of the 5-minute oscillatory signal at different heights in the solar atmosphere. We compare these signals with simultaneous observations from GOLF/SOHO and from the Mark-I instrument -- a node of the BiSON network, operating at the same site.
  • The detection of the signature of dipole gravity modes has opened the path to study the solar inner radiative zone. Indeed, g modes should be the best probes to infer the properties of the solar nuclear core that represents more than half of the total mass of the Sun. Concerning the dynamics of the solar core, we can study how future observations of individual g modes could enhance our knowledge of the rotation profile of the deep radiative zone. Applying inversions on a set of real p-mode splittings coupled with either one or several g modes, we have checked the improvement of the inferred rotation profile when different error bars are considered for the g modes. Moreover, using a new methodology based on the analysis of the almost constant separation of the dipole gravity modes, we can introduce new constraints on solar models. For that purpose, we can compare g-mode predictions computed from several models including different physical inputs with the g-mode asymptotic signature detected in GOLF data and calculate the correlation. This work shows the great consistency between the signature of dipole gravity modes and our knowledge of p-modes: incompatibility of data with a present standard model including the Asplund composition
  • Below 1 mHz, the power spectrum of helioseismic velocity measurements is dominated by the spectrum of convective motions (granulation and supergranulation) making it difficult to detect the low-order acoustic modes and the gravity modes. We want to better understand the behavior of solar granulation as a function of the observing height in the solar atmosphere and with magnetic activity during solar cycle 23. We analyze the Power Spectral Density (PSD) of eleven years of GOLF/SOHO velocity-time series using a Harvey-type model to characterize the properties of the convective motions in the solar oscillation power spectrum. We study then the evolution of the granulation with the altitude in the solar atmosphere and with the solar activity. First, we show that the traditional use of a lorentzian profile to fit the envelope of the p modes is not well suitable for GOLF data. Indeed, to properly model the solar spectrum, we need a second lorentzian profile. Second, we show that the granulation clearly evolves with the height in the photosphere but does not present any significant variation with the activity cycle.
  • This article quickly summarizes the performances and results of the GOLF/SoHO resonant spectrometer, thus justifying to go a step further. We then recall the characteristics of the multichannel resonant GOLF-NG spectrometer and present the first successful performances of the laboratory tests on the prototype and also the limitations of this first technological instrument. Scientific questions and an observation strategy are discussed.