• Targeted spectroscopic exoplanet surveys face the challenge of maximizing their planet detection rates by means of careful planning. The number of possible observation combinations for a large exoplanet survey, i.e., the sequence of observations night after night, both in total time and amount of targets, is enormous. Sophisticated scheduling tools and the improved understanding of the exoplanet population are employed to investigate an efficient and optimal way to plan the execution of observations. This is applied to the CARMENES instrument, which is an optical and infrared high-resolution spectrograph that has started a survey of about 300 M-dwarf stars in search for terrestrial exoplanets. We use evolutionary computation techniques to create an automatic scheduler that minimizes the idle periods of the telescope and that distributes the observations among all the targets using configurable criteria. We simulate the case of the CARMENES survey with a realistic sample of targets, and we estimate the efficiency of the planning tool both in terms of telescope operations and planet detection. Our scheduling simulations produce plans that use about 99$\%$ of the available telescope time (including overheads) and optimally distribute the observations among the different targets. Under such conditions, and using current planet statistics, the optimized plan using this tool should allow the CARMENES survey to discover about 65$\%$ of the planets with radial-velocity semi-amplitudes greater than 1$~m\thinspace s^{-1}$ when considering only photon noise. The simulations using our scheduling tool show that it is possible to optimize the survey planning by minimizing idle instrument periods and fulfilling the science objectives in an efficient manner to maximize the scientific return.
  • Chromospheric activity monitoring of a wide range of cool stars can provide valuable information on stellar magnetic activity and its dependence on fundamental stellar parameters such as effective temperature and rotation.We compile a chromospheric activity catalogue of 4454 cool stars from a combination of archival HARPS spectra and multiple other surveys, including the Mount Wilson data that have recently been released by the NSO. We explore the variation in chromospheric activity of cool stars along the main sequence for stars with different effective temperatures. Additionally, we also perform an activity-cycle period search and investigate its relation with rotation. The chromospheric activity index, S-index, was measured for 304 main-sequence stars from archived high-resolution HARPS spectra. Additionally, the measured and archived S-indices were converted into the chromospheric flux ratio log R'HK. The activity-cycle periods were determined using the generalised Lomb-Scargle periodogram to study the active and inactive branches on the rotation-activity-cycle period plane. The global sample shows that the bimodality of chromospheric activity, known as the Vaughan-Preston gap, is not prominent, with a significant percentage of the stars at an intermediate-activity level around log R'HK = -4.75. Independently, the cycle period search shows that stars can lie in the region intermediate between the active and inactive branch, which means that the active branch is not as clearly distinct as previously thought. The weakening of the Vaughan-Preston gap indicates that cool stars spin down from a higher activity level and settle at a lower activity level without a sudden break at intermediate activity. Some cycle periods are close to the solar value between the active and inactive branch, which suggests that the solar dynamo is most likely a common case of the stellar dynamo.
  • Previous simulations predicted the activity-induced radial-velocity (RV) variations of M dwarfs to range from $\sim1$ cm/s to $\sim1$ km/s, depending on various stellar and activity parameters. We investigate the observed relations between RVs, stellar activity, and stellar parameters of M dwarfs by analyzing CARMENES high-resolution visual-channel spectra ($0.5$$-$$1$$\mu$m), which were taken within the CARMENES RV planet survey during its first $20$ months of operation. During this time, $287$ of the CARMENES-sample stars were observed at least five times. From each spectrum we derived a relative RV and a measure of chromospheric H$\alpha$ emission. In addition, we estimated the chromatic index (CRX) of each spectrum, which is a measure of the RV wavelength dependence. Despite having a median number of only $11$ measurements per star, we show that the RV variations of the stars with RV scatter of $>10$ m/s and a projected rotation velocity $v \sin{i}>2$ km/s are caused mainly by activity. We name these stars `active RV-loud stars' and find their occurrence to increase with spectral type: from $\sim3\%$ for early-type M dwarfs (M$0.0$$-$$2.5$V) through $\sim30\%$ for mid-type M dwarfs (M$3.0$$-$$5.5$V) to $>50\%$ for late-type M dwarfs (M$6.0$$-$$9.0$V). Their RV-scatter amplitude is found to be correlated mainly with $v \sin{i}$. For about half of the stars, we also find a linear RV$-$CRX anticorrelation, which indicates that their activity-induced RV scatter is lower at longer wavelengths. For most of them we can exclude a linear correlation between RV and H$\alpha$ emission. Our results are in agreement with simulated activity-induced RV variations in M dwarfs. The RV variations of most active RV-loud M dwarfs are likely to be caused by dark spots on their surfaces, which move in and out of view as the stars rotate.
  • Stellar activity is ubiquitously encountered in M dwarfs and often characterised by the H$\alpha$ line. In the most active M dwarfs, H$\alpha$ is found in emission, sometimes with a complex line profile. Previous studies have reported extended wings and asymmetries in the H$\alpha$ line during flares. We used a total of 473 high-resolution spectra of 28 active M dwarfs obtained by the CARMENES (Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exo-earths with Near-infrared and optical Echelle Spectrographs) spectrograph to study the occurrence of broadened and asymmetric H$\alpha$ line profiles and their association with flares, and examine possible physical explanations. We detected a total of 41 flares and 67 broad, potentially asymmetric, wings in H$\alpha$. The broadened H$\alpha$ lines display a variety of profiles with symmetric cases and both red and blue asymmetries. Although some of these line profiles are found during flares, the majority are at least not obviously associated with flaring. We propose a mechanism similar to coronal rain or chromospheric downward condensations as a cause for the observed red asymmetries; the symmetric cases may also be caused by Stark broadening. We suggest that blue asymmetries are associated with rising material, and our results are consistent with a prevalence of blue asymmetries during the flare onset. Besides the H$\alpha$ asymmetries, we find some cases of additional line asymmetries in \ion{He}{i} D$_{3}$, \ion{Na}{i}~D lines, and the \ion{He}{i} line at 10830\,\AA\, taken all simultaneously thanks to the large wavelength coverage of CARMENES. Our study shows that asymmetric H$\alpha$ lines are a rather common phenomenon in M~dwarfs and need to be studied in more detail to obtain a better understanding of the atmospheric dynamics in these objects.
  • Context: The CARMENES survey is a high-precision radial velocity (RV) programme that aims to detect Earth-like planets orbiting low-mass stars. Aims: We develop least-squares fitting algorithms to derive the RVs and additional spectral diagnostics implemented in the SpEctrum Radial Velocity Analyser (SERVAL), a publicly available python code. Methods: We measured the RVs using high signal-to-noise templates created by coadding all available spectra of each star.We define the chromatic index as the RV gradient as a function of wavelength with the RVs measured in the echelle orders. Additionally, we computed the differential line width by correlating the fit residuals with the second derivative of the template to track variations in the stellar line width. Results: Using HARPS data, our SERVAL code achieves a RV precision at the level of 1m/s. Applying the chromatic index to CARMENES data of the active star YZ CMi, we identify apparent RV variations induced by stellar activity. The differential line width is found to be an alternative indicator to the commonly used full width half maximum. Conclusions: We find that at the red optical wavelengths (700--900 nm) obtained by the visual channel of CARMENES, the chromatic index is an excellent tool to investigate stellar active regions and to identify and perhaps even correct for activity-induced RV variations.
  • Magnetic activity and rotation are known to be intimately linked for low-mass stars. Understanding rotation evolution over the stellar lifetime is therefore an important goal within stellar astrophysics. In recent years, there has been increased focus on how the complexity of the stellar magnetic field affects the rate of angular momentum-loss from a star. This is a topic that Zeeman-Doppler imaging (ZDI), a technique that is capable of reconstructing the large-scale magnetic field topology of a star, can uniquely address. Using a potential field source surface model, we estimate the open flux, mass loss-rate and angular momentum-loss rates for a sample of 66 stars that have been mapped with ZDI. We show that the open flux of a star is predominantly determined by the dipolar component of its magnetic field for our choice of source surface radius. We also show that, on the main sequence, the open flux, mass- and angular momentum-loss rates increase with decreasing Rossby number. The exception to this rule is stars less massive than $0.3M_{\odot}$. Previous work suggests that low mass M dwarfs may possess either strong, ordered and dipolar fields or weak and complex fields. This range of field strengths results in a large spread of angular momentum-loss rates for these stars and has important consequences for their spin down behaviour. Additionally, our models do not predict a transition in the mass-loss rates at the so called wind dividing line noted from Ly$\alpha$ studies.
  • We present a spectropolarimetric snapshot survey of solar-type planet hosting stars. In addition to 14 planet-hosting stars observed as part of the BCool magnetic snapshot survey, we obtained magnetic observations of a further 19 planet-hosting solar-type stars in order to see if the presence of close-in planets had an effect on the measured surface magnetic field (|B$_{\ell}$|). Our results indicate that the magnetic activity of this sample is congruent with that of the overall BCool sample. The effects of the planetary systems on the magnetic activity of the parent star, if any, are too subtle to detect compared to the intrinsic dispersion and correlations with rotation, age and stellar activity proxies in our sample. Four of the 19 newly observed stars, two of which are subgiants, have unambiguously detected magnetic fields and are future targets for Zeeman Doppler Mapping.
  • The magnetic geometry of the surface magnetic fields of more than 55 cool stars have now been mapped using spectropolarimetry. In order to better understand these observations, we compare the magnetic field topology at different surface scale sizes of observed and simulated cool stars. For ease of comparison between the high-resolution non-potential magnetofrictional simulations and the relatively low-resolution observations, we filter out the small-scale field in the simulations using a spherical harmonics decomposition. We show that the large-scale field topologies of the solar-based simulations produce values of poloidal/toroidal fields and fractions of energy in axisymmetric modes that are similar to the observations. These global non-potential evolution model simulations capture key magnetic features of the observed solar-like stars through the processes of surface flux transport and magnetic flux emergence. They do not, however, reproduce the magnetic field of M-dwarfs or stars with dominantly toroidal field. Furthermore, we analyse the magnetic field topologies of individual spherical harmonics for the simulations and discover that the dipole is predominately poloidal, while the quadrupole shows the highest fraction of toroidal fields. Magnetic field structures smaller than a quadrupole display a fixed ratio between the poloidal and toroidal magnetic energies.
  • Whether BP Piscium (BP Psc) is either a pre-main sequence T Tauri star at d ~ 80 pc, or a post-main sequence G giant at d ~ 300 pc is still not clear. As a first-ascent giant, it is the first to be observed with a molecular and dust disk. Alternatively, BP Psc would be among the nearest T Tauri stars with a protoplanetary disk (PPD). We investigate whether the disk geometry resembles typical PPDs, by comparing polarimetric images with radiative transfer models. Our VLT/SPHERE/ZIMPOL observations allow us to perform Polarimetric Differential Imaging; Reference Star Differential Imaging; and Richardson-Lucy deconvolution. We present the first visible light polarization and intensity images of the disk of BP Psc. Our deconvolution confirms the disk shape as detected before, mainly showing the southern side of the disk. In polarized intensity the disk is imaged at larger detail and also shows the northern side, giving it the typical shape of high inclination flared disks. We explain the observed disk features by retrieving the large-scale geometry with MCMax radiative transfer modeling, which yields a strongly flared model, atypical for disks of T Tauri stars.
  • Zeeman Doppler imaging has successfully mapped the large-scale magnetic fields of stars over a large range of spectral types, rotation periods and ages. When observed over multiple epochs, some stars show polarity reversals in their global magnetic fields. On the Sun, polarity reversals are a feature of its activity cycle. In this paper, we examine the magnetic properties of stars with existing chromospherically determined cycle periods. Previous authors have suggested that cycle periods lie on multiple branches, either in the cycle period-Rossby number plane or the cycle period-rotation period plane. We find some evidence that stars along the active branch show significant average toroidal fields that exhibit large temporal variations while stars exclusively on the inactive branch remain dominantly poloidal throughout their entire cycle. This lends credence to the idea that different shear layers are in operation along each branch. There is also evidence that the short magnetic polarity switches observed on some stars are characteristic of the inactive branch while the longer chromospherically determined periods are characteristic of the active branch. This may explain the discrepancy between the magnetic and chromospheric cycle periods found on some stars. These results represent a first attempt at linking global magnetic field properties obtained form ZDI and activity cycles.
  • Aims: We search for low-mass companions of M dwarfs and characterize their multiplicity fraction with the purpose of helping in the selection of the most appropriate targets for the CARMENES exoplanet survey. Methods: We obtained high-resolution images in the I band with the lucky imaging instrument FastCam at the 1.5 m Telescopio Carlos Sanchez for 490 mid- to late-M dwarfs. For all the detected binaries, we measured angular separations, position angles, and magnitude differences in the I band. We also calculated the masses of each individual component and estimated orbital periods, using the available magnitude and colour relations for M dwarfs and our own MJ-spectral type and mass-MI relations. To avoid biases in our sample selection, we built a volume-limited sample of M0.0-M5.0 dwarfs that is complete up to 86% within 14 pc. Results: From the 490 observed stars, we detected 80 companions in 76 systems, of which 30 are new discoveries. The multiplicity fraction in our observed sample is 16.7+-2.0% . In our volume-limited sample it is 19.5+-2.3% for angular separations of 0.2 to 5.0 arcsec (1.4-65.6 au), The distribution of the projected physical separations peaks at 2.5-7.5 au. For M0.0-M3.5 V primaries, our search is sensitive to mass ratios higher than 0.3. Binaries with projected physical separations shorter than 50 au tend to be of equal mass. For 26 of our systems, we estimated orbital periods shorter than 50 a, 10 of which are presented here for the first time. We measured variations in angular separation and position angle that are due to orbital motions in 17 of these systems. The contribution of binaries and multiples with angular separations shorter than 0.2 arcsec, longer than 5.0 arcsec, and of spectroscopic binaries identified from previous searches, although not complete, may increase the multiplicity fraction of M dwarfs in our volume-limited sample to at least 36%.
  • The long-term monitoring of magnetic cycles in cool stars is a key diagnostic in understanding how dynamo generation and amplification of magnetic fields occur in stars similar in structure to the Sun. We investigate the temporal evolution of a possible magnetic cycle, determined from its large-scale field, of 61 Cyg A over its activity cycle using spectropolarimetric observations and compare it to the solar case. We use Zeeman Doppler imaging (ZDI) to reconstruct the large-scale magnetic geometry over multiple observational epochs spread over a time span of nine years. We investigate the time evolution of the different components of the large-scale field and compare it with the evolution of its chromospheric activity by measuring the flux in three different chromospheric indicators: Ca II H&K, H-alpha and Ca II infra red triplet lines. We also compare our results with the star's coronal activity using XMM-Newton observations. The large-scale magnetic geometry of 61 Cyg A exhibits polarity reversals in both poloidal and toroidal field components, in phase with the chromospheric activity cycle. We also detect weak solar-like differential rotation with a shear level similar to the Sun. During our observational time span of nine years, 61 Cyg A exhibits solar-like variations in its large-scale field geometry as it evolves from minimum activity to maximum activity and vice versa. During its activity minimum in epoch 2007.59, ZDI reconstructs a simple dipolar geometry which becomes more complex close to activity maximum in epoch 2010.55. The radial field flips polarity and reverts back to a simple geometry in epoch 2013.61. The field is strongly dipolar and the evolution of the dipole component of the field is reminiscent of the solar behaviour. The polarity reversal of the large-scale field indicates a magnetic cycle that is in phase with the chromospheric and coronal cycle.
  • We present six epochs of spectropolarimetric observations of the hot-Jupiter-hosting star $\tau$ Bo\"otis that extend the exceptional previous multi-year data set of its large-scale magnetic field. Our results confirm that the large-scale magnetic field of $\tau$ Bo\"otis varies cyclicly, with the observation of two further magnetic reversals; between December 2013 and May 2014 and between January and March 2015. We also show that the field evolves in a broadly solar-type manner in contrast to other F-type stars. We further present new results which indicate that the chromospheric activity cycle and the magnetic activity cycles are related, which would indicate a very rapid magnetic cycle. As an exemplar of long-term magnetic field evolution, $\tau$ Bo\"otis and this longterm monitoring campaign presents a unique opportunity for studying stellar magnetic cycles.
  • We present new wind models for {\tau} Bo\"otis ({\tau} Boo), a hot-Jupiter-host-star whose observable magnetic cycles makes it a uniquely useful target for our goal of monitoring the temporal variability of stellar winds and their exoplanetary impacts. Using spectropolarimetric observations from May 2009 to January 2015, the most extensive information of this type yet available, to reconstruct the stellar magnetic field, we produce multiple 3D magnetohydrodynamic stellar wind models. Our results show that characteristic changes in the large-scale magnetic field as the star undergoes magnetic cycles produce changes in the wind properties, both globally and locally at the position of the orbiting planet. Whilst the mass loss rate of the star varies by only a minimal amount ($\sim$ 4 percent), the rates of angular momentum loss and associated spin-down timescales are seen to vary widely (up to $\sim$ 140 percent), findings consistent with and extending previous research. In addition, we find that temporal variation in the global wind is governed mainly by changes in total magnetic flux rather than changes in wind plasma properties. The magnetic pressure varies with time and location and dominates the stellar wind pressure at the planetary orbit. By assuming a Jovian planetary magnetic field for {\tau} Boo b, we nevertheless conclude that the planetary magnetosphere can remain stable in size for all observed stellar cycle epochs, despite significant changes in the stellar field and the resulting local space weather environment.
  • Wood et al suggested that mass-loss rate is a function of X-ray flux ($\dot{M} \propto F_x^{1.34}$) for dwarf stars with $F_x \lesssim F_{x,6} \equiv 10^6$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. However, more active stars do not obey this relation. These authors suggested that the break at $F_{x,6}$ could be caused by significant changes in magnetic field topology that would inhibit stellar wind generation. Here, we investigate this hypothesis by analysing the stars in Wood et al's sample that had their surface magnetic fields reconstructed through Zeeman-Doppler Imaging (ZDI). Although the solar-like outliers in the $\dot{M}$ -- $F_x$ relation have higher fractional toroidal magnetic energy, we do not find evidence of a sharp transition in magnetic topology at $F_{x,6}$. To confirm this, further wind measurements and ZDI observations at both sides of the break are required. As active stars can jump between states with highly toroidal to highly poloidal fields, we expect significant scatter in magnetic field topology to exist for stars with $F_x \gtrsim F_{x,6}$. This strengthens the importance of multi-epoch ZDI observations. Finally, we show that there is a correlation between $F_x$ and magnetic energy, which implies that $\dot{M}$ -- magnetic energy relation has the same qualitative behaviour as the original $\dot{M}$ -- $F_x$ relation. No break is seen in any of the $F_x$ -- magnetic energy
  • Since M4.5 - M9 dwarfs exhibit equatorial rotation velocities of order 10 km/s on average, radial velocity surveys targeting this stellar population will likely need to find methods to effectively remove starspot jitter. We present the first high resolution Doppler images of the M4.5 dwarf, GJ 791.2A, and the M9 dwarf, LP 944-20. The time series spectra of both objects reveal numerous line profile distortions over the rotation period of each star which we interpret as starspots. The transient distortions are modelled with spot/photosphere contrast ratios that correspond to model atmosphere temperature differences of Tphot-Tspot = 200 and 300 K. GJ 791.2A is a fully convective star with vsini = 35.1 km/s. Although we find more starspot structure at high latitudes, we reconstruct spots at a range of phases and latitudes with a mean spot filling of ~3%. LP 944-20 is one of the brightest known late-M dwarfs, with spectral type M9V and vsini = 30.8 km/s. Its spectral time series exhibits two dominant transient line distortions that are reconstructed as high latitude spots, while a mean spot filling factor of only 1.5% is found. The occurrence of low-contrast spots at predominantly high latitudes, which we see in both targets here, is in general likely to be responsible for the low amplitude photometric variability seen in late-M dwarfs. For GJ 791.2A, the radial velocities induced by the starspot features yield an rms velocity variability of 138 m/s, which can be reduced by a factor of 1.9 using our reconstructed surface brightness distributions.
  • Spectropolarimetric observations have been used to map stellar magnetic fields, many of which display strong bands of azimuthal fields that are toroidal. A number of explanations have been proposed to explain how such fields might be generated though none are definitive. In this paper, we examine the toroidal fields of a sample of 55 stars with magnetic maps, with masses in the range 0.1-1.5$\,{\rm M}_\odot$. We find that the energy contained in toroidal fields has a power law dependence on the energy contained in poloidal fields. However the power index is not constant across our sample, with stars less and more massive than 0.5$\,{\rm M}_\odot$ having power indices of 0.72$\pm$0.08 and 1.25$\pm$0.06 respectively. There is some evidence that these two power laws correspond to stars in the saturated and unsaturated regimes of the rotation-activity relation. Additionally, our sample shows that strong toroidal fields must be generated axisymmetrically. The latitudes at which these bands appear depend on the stellar rotation period with fast rotators displaying higher latitude bands than slow rotators. The results in this paper present new constraints for future dynamo studies.
  • Context. CARMENES is a stabilised, high-resolution, double-channel spectrograph at the 3.5 m Calar Alto telescope. It is optimally designed for radial-velocity surveys of M dwarfs with potentially habitable Earth-mass planets. Aims. We prepare a list of the brightest, single M dwarfs in each spectral subtype observable from the northern hemisphere, from which we will select the best planet-hunting targets for CARMENES. Methods. In this first paper on the preparation of our input catalogue, we compiled a large amount of public data and collected low-resolution optical spectroscopy with CAFOS at the 2.2 m Calar Alto telescope for 753 stars. We derived accurate spectral types using a dense grid of standard stars, a double least-squares minimisation technique, and 31 spectral indices previously defined by other authors. Additionally, we quantified surface gravity, metallicity, and chromospheric activity for all the stars in our sample. Results. We calculated spectral types for all 753 stars, of which 305 are new and 448 are revised. We measured pseudo-equivalent widths of Halpha for all the stars in our sample, concluded that chromospheric activity does not affect spectral typing from our indices, and tabulated 49 stars that had been reported to be young stars in open clusters, moving groups, and stellar associations. Of the 753 stars, two are new subdwarf candidates, three are T Tauri stars, 25 are giants, 44 are K dwarfs, and 679 are M dwarfs. Many of the 261 investigated dwarfs in the range M4.0-8.0 V are among the brightest stars known in their spectral subtype. Conclusions. This collection of low-resolution spectroscopic data serves as a candidate target list for the CARMENES survey and can be highly valuable for other radial-velocity surveys of M dwarfs and for studies of cool dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood.
  • Understanding the formation of planetary nebulae remains elusive because in the preceding asymtotic giant branch (AGB) phase these stars are heavily enshrouded in an optically thick dusty envelope. To further understand the morphology of the circumstellar environments of AGB stars we observe the closest carbon-rich AGB star IRC+10216 in scattered light. When imaged in scattered light at optical wavelengths, IRC+10216 surprisingly shows a narrow equatorial density enhancement, in contrast to the large-scale spherical rings that have been imaged much further out. We use radiative transfer models to interpret this structure in terms of two models: firstly, an equatorial density enhancement, commonly observed in the more evolved post-AGB stars, and secondly, in terms of a dust rings model, where a local enhancement of mass-loss creates a spiral ring as the star rotates. We conclude that both models can be used to reproduce the dark lane in the scattered light images, which is caused by an equatorially density enhancement formed by dense dust rather than a bipolar outflow as previously thought. We are unable to place constraints on the formation of the equatorial density enhancement by a binary system.
  • The circumstellar environments of classical T Tauri stars are challenging to directly image because of their high star-to-disk contrast ratio. One method to overcome this is by using imaging polarimetry where scattered and consequently polarised starlight from the star's circumstellar disk can be separated from the unpolarised light of the central star. We present images of the circumstellar environment of SU Aur, a classical T Tauri star at the transition of T Tauri to Herbig stars. The images directly show that the disk extends out to ~500 au with an inclination angle of $\sim$ 50$^\circ$. Using interpretive models, we derived very small grains in the surface layers of its disk, with a very steep size- and surface-density distribution. Additionally, we resolved a large and extended nebulosity in our images that is most likely a remnant of the prenatal molecular cloud. The position angle of the disk, determined directly from our images, rules out a polar outflow or jet as the cause of this large-scale nebulosity.
  • High-resolution spectropolarimetric observations provide simultaneous information about stellar magnetic field topologies and three-dimensional distributions of chemical elements. Here we present analysis of a unique full Stokes vector spectropolarimetric data set, acquired for the cool magnetic Ap star HD 24712. The goal of our work is to examine circular and linear polarization signatures inside spectral lines and to study variation of the stellar spectrum and magnetic observables as a function of rotational phase. HD 24712 was observed with the HARPSpol instrument at the 3.6-m ESO telescope over a period of 2010-2011. The resulting spectra have S/N ratio of 300-600 and resolving power exceeding 100000. The multiline technique of least-squares deconvolution (LSD) was applied to combine information from the spectral lines of Fe-peak and rare-earth elements. We used the HARPSPol spectra of HD 24712 to study the morphology of the Stokes profile shapes in individual spectral lines and in LSD Stokes profiles corresponding to different line masks. From the LSD Stokes V profiles we measured the longitudinal component of the magnetic field, <Bz>, with an accuracy of 5-10 G. We also determined the net linear polarization from the LSD Stokes Q and U profiles. We determined an improved rotational period of the star, P_rot = 12.45812 +/- 0.00019d. We measured <Bz> from the cores of Halpha and Hbeta lines. The analysis of <Bz> measurements showed no evidence for a significant radial magnetic field gradient in the atmosphere of HD 24712. We used our <Bz> and net linear polarization measurements to determine parameters of the dipolar magnetic field topology. We found that magnetic observables can be reasonably well reproduced by the dipolar model. We discovered rotational modulation of the Halpha core and related it a non-uniform surface distribution of rare-earth elements.
  • We present high spectral resolution ($R\approx108,000$) Stokes $V$ polarimetry of the Classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) GQ Lup and TW Hya obtained with the polarimetric upgrade to the HARPS spectrometer on the ESO 3.6 m telescope. We present data on both photospheric lines and emission lines, concentrating our discussion on the polarization properties of the \ion{He}{1} emission lines at 5876 \AA\ and 6678 \AA. The \ion{He}{1} lines in these CTTSs contain both narrow emission cores, believed to come from near the accretion shock region on these stars, and broad emission components which may come from either a wind or the large scale magnetospheric accretion flow. We detect strong polarization in the narrow component of the two \ion{He}{1} emission lines in both stars. We observe a maximum implied field strength of $6.05 \pm 0.24$ kG in the 5876 \AA\ line of GQ Lup, making it the star with the highest field strength measured in this line for a CTTS. We find field strengths in the two \ion{He}{1} lines that are consistent with each other, in contrast to what has been reported in the literature on at least one star. We do not detect any polarization in the broad component of the \ion{He}{1} lines on these stars, strengthening the conclusion that they form over a substantially different volume relative the formation region of the narrow component of the \ion{He}{1} lines.
  • We present an analysis of the photometric variability of M dwarfs in the WFCAM Transit Survey. Although periodic lightcurve variability in low mass stars is generally dominated by photospheric star spot activity, M dwarf variability in the J band has not been as thoroughly investigated as at visible wavelengths. Spectral type estimates for a sample of over 200,000 objects are made using spectral type-colour relations, and over 9600 dwarfs (J<17) with spectral types later than K7 were found. The light curves of the late-type sample are searched for periodicity using a Lomb-Scargle periodogram analysis. A total of 68 periodic variable M dwarfs are found in the sample with periods ranging from 0.16 days to 90.33 days, with amplitudes in the range of ~0.009 to ~0.115 in the J band. We simulate active M dwarfs with a range of latitude-independent spot coverages and estimate a periodically variable fractions of 1-3 per cent for stars where spots cover more than 10 per cent of the star's surface. Our simulated spot distributions indicate that operating in the J band, where spot contrast ratios are minimised, enables variability in only the most active of stars to be detected. These findings affirm the benefits of using the $J$ band for planetary transit searches compared to visible bands. We also serendipitously find a \Delta J>0.2 mag flaring event from an M4V star in our sample.
  • Well over 700 exoplanets have been detected to date. Only a handful of these have been observed directly. Direct observation is extremely challenging due to the small separation and very large contrast involved. Imaging polarimetry offers a way to decrease the contrast between the unpolarized starlight and the light that has become linearly polarized after scattering by circumstellar material. This material can be the dust and debris found in circumstellar disks, but also the atmosphere or surface of an exoplanet. We present the design, calibration approach, polarimetric performance and sample observation results of the Extreme Polarimeter, an imaging polarimeter for the study of circumstellar environments in scattered light at visible wavelengths. The polarimeter uses the beam-exchange technique, in which the two orthogonal polarization states are imaged simultaneously and a polarization modulator swaps the polarization states of the two beams before the next image is taken. The instrument currently operates without the aid of Adaptive Optics. To reduce the effects of atmospheric seeing on the polarimetry, the images are taken at a frame rate of 35 fps, and large numbers of frames are combined to obtain the polarization images. Four successful observing runs have been performed using this instrument at the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope on La Palma, targeting young stars with protoplanetary disks as well as evolved stars surrounded by dusty envelopes. In terms of fractional polarization, the instrument sensitivity is better than 10^-4. The contrast achieved between the central star and the circumstellar source is of the order 10^-6. We show that our calibration approach yields absolute polarization errors below 1%.
  • Magnetic fields are regarded as a crucial element for our understanding of stellar physics. They can be studied with a variety of methods which provide complementary - and sometimes contradictory - information about the structure, strength and dynamics of the magnetic field and its role in the evolution of stars. Stellar magnetic fields can be investigated either with direct methods based on the Zeeman effect or through the observation of activity phenomena resulting from the interaction of the field with the stellar atmosphere. In this Cool Stars XVII Splinter Session we discussed the results obtained by the many ongoing studies of stellar activity and direct studies of surface magnetic fields, as well as the state- of-the-art techniques on which they are based. We show the strengths and limitations of the various approaches currently used and to point out their evolution as well as the interest of coupling various magnetism and activity proxies.