• As part of the NASA-CNES agreement, the NASA Star and Exoplanet Database (NStED) serves as the official US portal for the public CoRoT data products. NStED is a general purpose archive with the aim of providing support for NASA's planet finding and characterization goals. Consequently, the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI) developed, and NStED adapted, a periodogram service for CoRoT data to determine periods of variability phenomena and create phased photometric light curves. Through the NStED periodogram interface, the user may choose three different period detection algorithms to use on any photometric time series product, or even upload and analyze their own data. Additionally, the NStED periodogram is remotely accessed by the CoRoT archive as part of its interface. NStED is available at {\bf http://nsted.ipac.caltech.edu}.
  • We present a catalog of 9017 X-ray sources identified in Chandra observations of a 2 by 0.8 degree field around the Galactic center. We increase the number of known X-ray sources in the region by a factor of 2.5. The catalog incorporates all of the ACIS-I observations as of 2007 August, which total 2.25 Msec of exposure. At the distance to the Galactic center (8 kpc), we are sensitive to sources with luminosities >4e32 erg/s (0.5-8.0 keV; 90% confidence) over an area of one square degree, and up to an order of magnitude more sensitive in the deepest exposure (1.0 Msec) around Sgr A*. The positions of 60% of our sources are accurate to <1" (95% confidence), and 20% have positions accurate to <0.5". We search for variable sources, and find that 3% exhibit flux variations within an observation, 10% exhibit variations from observation-to-observation. We also find one source, CXOUGC J174622.7-285218, with a periodic 1745 s signal (1.4% chance probability), which is probably a magnetically-accreting cataclysmic variable. We compare the spatial distribution of X-ray sources to a model for the stellar distribution, and find 2.8 sigma evidence for excesses in the numbers of X-ray sources in the region of recent star formation encompassed by the Arches, Quintuplet, and Galactic center star clusters. These excess sources are also seen in the luminosity distribution of the X-ray sources, which is flatter near the Arches and Quintuplet than elsewhere in the field. These excess point sources, along with a similar longitudinal asymmetry in the distribution of diffuse iron emission that has been reported by other authors, probably have their origin in the young stars that are prominent at l~0.1 degree.
  • We have studied the correlation between 2357 Chandra X-ray point sources in a 40 x 40 parsec field and ~20,000 infrared sources we observed in the corresponding subset of our 2 x 1.4 degree Spitzer/IRAC Galactic Center Survey at 3.6-8.0 um, using various spatial and X-ray hardness thresholds. The correlation was determined for source separations of less than 0.5", 1" or 2". Only the soft X-ray sources show any correlation with infrared point sources on these scales, and that correlation is very weak. The upper limit on hard X-ray sources that have infrared counterparts is <1.7% (3 sigma). However, because of the confusion limit of the IR catalog, we only detect IR sources with absolute magnitudes < ~1. As a result, a stronger correlation with fainter sources cannot be ruled out. Only one compact infrared source, IRS 13, coincides with any of the dozen prominent X-ray emission features in the 3 x 3 parsec region centered on Sgr A*, and the diffuse X-ray and infrared emission around Sgr A* seems to be anti-correlated on a few-arcsecond scale. We compare our results with previous identifications of near-infrared companions to Chandra X-ray sources.
  • OH(1720 MHz) and methanol masers are now recognized to be excellent probes of the interactions of supernova remnants with molecular clouds and tracers of massive star formation, respectively. To better understand the nature of star formation activity in the central region of the Galaxy, we have used these two classes of masers combined with the IRAC and MIPS data to study prominent sites of ongoing star formation in the nuclear disk. The nuclear disk is characterized by massive GMCs with elevated gas temperatures, compared to their dust temperatures. We note an association between methanol masers and a class of mid-infrared ``green sources''. These highly embedded YSOs show enhanced 4.5micron emission due to excited molecular lines. The distribution of methanol masers and supernova remnants suggest a low efficiency of star formation (with the exception of Sgr B2), which we believe is due to an enhanced flux of cosmic ray electrons impacting molecular clouds in the nuclear disk. We also highlight the importance of cosmic rays in their ability to heat molecular clouds, and thus increase the gas temperature.
  • Chandra observations of solar-like pre-main sequence (PMS) stars in the Orion Flanking Fields (age ~1 Myr) and NGC 2264 (~3 Myr) are compared with the results of the COUP survey of similar objects in the ONC (~0.5 Myr). The correlations between log Lx and mass found for PMS stars on convective tracks in these clusters are consistent with the relationships found for the ONC, indicating little change in the median values of either log Lx or log Lx/Lbol during the first ~3-5 Myr of evolution down convective tracks. The fraction of stars with extreme values of Lx, more than 10 times higher than the average for a given Lbol or with log Lx/Lbol greater than the canonical saturation value of -2.9, is however larger by a factor of two in the younger ONC when compared with the Orion FF and NGC 2264. PMS stars in NGC 2264 on radiative tracks have Lx/Lbol values that are systematically lower by a factor of ~10 times than those found for stars of similar mass on convective tracks. The dramatic decrease in flux from convective to radiative phases of PMS evolution is likely related to major structural changes which influence the efficiency of magnetic field generation and thus the level of magnetic activity. As in the ONC, we find that stars with measured periods have, on average, higher X-ray luminosities. However, there is a wide range in Lx and Lx/Lbol for both periodic and non-periodic stars of similar mass. Among stars with measured periods, the level of X-ray emission does not correlate with the rotation rate. For this data set, we find no statistically significant correlation between X-ray flux and (a) the presence or absence of circumstellar accretion disks, or (b) disk accretion rates as assessed from ultraviolet excesses.