• The Euclid space mission proposes to survey 15000 square degrees of the extragalactic sky during 6 years, with a step-and-stare technique. The scheduling of observation sequences is driven by the primary scientific objectives, spacecraft constraints, calibration requirements and physical properties of the sky. We present the current reference implementation of the Euclid survey and on-going work on survey optimization.
  • Euclid is the next ESA mission devoted to cosmology. It aims at observing most of the extragalactic sky, studying both gravitational lensing and clustering over $\sim$15,000 square degrees. The mission is expected to be launched in year 2020 and to last six years. The sheer amount of data of different kinds, the variety of (un)known systematic effects and the complexity of measures require efforts both in sophisticated simulations and techniques of data analysis. We review the mission main characteristics, some aspects of the the survey and highlight some of the areas of interest to this meeting
  • Supernova fallback disks around neutron stars have been discussed to influence the evolution of the diverse neutron star populations. Slowly rotating neutron stars are most promising to find such disks. Searching for the cold and warm debris of old fallback disks, we carried out Herschel PACS (70 $\mu$m, 160 $\mu$m) and Spitzer IRAC (3.6 $\mu$m, 4.5 $\mu$m) observations of eight slowly rotating ($P\approx 3 - 11$ s) nearby ($<1$ kpc) isolated neutron stars. Herschel detected 160 $\mu$m emission ($>5\sigma$) at locations consistent with the positions of the neutron stars RX J0806.4-4123 and RX J2143.0+0654. No other significant infrared emission was detected from the eight neutron stars. We estimate probabilities of 63%, 33% and 3% that, respectively, none, one, or both Herschel PACS 160 $\mu$m detections are unrelated excess sources due to background source confusion or an interstellar cirrus. If the 160 $\mu$m emission is indeed related to cold (10 K to 22 K) dust around the neutron stars, this dust is absorbing and re-emitting $\sim 10$% to $\sim 20$% of the neutron stars' X-rays. Such high efficiencies would be at least three orders of magnitude larger than the efficiencies of debris disks around nondegenerate stars. While thin dusty disks around the neutron stars can be excluded as counterparts of the 160 $\mu$m emission, dusty asteroid belts constitute a viable option.
  • We have conducted a detailed multi-wavelength study of the peculiar nebula Abell 48 and its central star. We classify the nucleus as a helium-rich, hydrogen-deficient star of type [WN4-5]. The evidence for either a massive WN or a low-mass [WN] interpretation is critically examined, and we firmly conclude that Abell 48 is a planetary nebula (PN) around an evolved low-mass star, rather than a Population I ejecta nebula. Importantly, the surrounding nebula has a morphology typical of PNe, and is not enriched in nitrogen, and thus not the `peeled atmosphere' of a massive star. We estimate a distance of 1.6 kpc and a reddening, E(B-V) = 1.90 mag, the latter value clearly showing the nebula lies on the near side of the Galactic bar, and cannot be a massive WN star. The ionized mass (~0.3 M_Sun) and electron density (700 cm^-3) are typical of middle-aged PNe. The observed stellar spectrum was compared to a grid of models from the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) grid. The best fit temperature is 71 kK, and the atmospheric composition is dominated by helium with an upper limit on the hydrogen abundance of 10 per cent. Our results are in very good agreement with the recent study of Todt et al., who determined a hydrogen fraction of 10 per cent and an unusually large nitrogen fraction of ~5 per cent. This fraction is higher than any other low-mass H-deficient star, and is not readily explained by current post-AGB models. We give a discussion of the implications of this discovery for the late-stage evolution of intermediate-mass stars. There is now tentative evidence for two distinct helium-dominated post-AGB lineages, separate to the helium and carbon dominated surface compositions produced by a late thermal pulse. Further theoretical work is needed to explain these recent discoveries.
  • We have conducted a multi-wavelength study of the planetary nebula Abell 48 and give a revised classification of its nucleus as a hydrogen-deficient star of type [WN4]. The surrounding nebula has a morphology typical of PNe and importantly, is not enriched in nitrogen, and thus not the 'peeled atmosphere' of a massive star. Indeed, no WN4 star is known to be surrounded by such a compact nebula. The ionized mass of the nebula is also a powerful discriminant between the low-mass PN and high-mass WR ejecta interpretations. The ionized mass would be impossibly high if a distance corresponding to a Pop I star was adopted, but at a distance of 2 kpc, the mass is quite typical of moderately evolved PNe. At this distance, the ionizing star then has a luminosity of ~5000 Lsolar, again rather typical for a PN central star. We give a brief discussion of the implications of this discovery for the late-stage evolution of intermediate-mass stars.
  • We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in January 2009, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties. We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J1550-5418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two black-body functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model we find a mean power-law index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlation between the Comptonized Epeak and the burst fluence and average flux. For the BB+BB fits we find that the fluences and emission areas of the two blackbody functions are correlated. The low-temperature BB has an emission area comparable to the neutron star surface area, independent of the temperature, while the high-temperature blackbody has a much smaller area and shows an anti-correlation between emission area and temperature. We compare the properties of these bursts with bursts observed from other SGR sources during extreme activations, and discuss the implications of our results in the context of magnetar burst models.
  • With the launch of the {\em Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer} ({\em WISE}), a new era of detecting planetary debris and brown dwarfs around white dwarfs (WDs) has begun with the {\em WISE} InfraRed Excesses around Degenerates (WIRED) Survey. The WIRED Survey is sensitive to substellar objects and dusty debris around WDs out to distances exceeding 100 pc, well beyond the completeness level of local WDs. In this paper, we present a cross-correlation of the preliminary Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) WD Catalog between the {\em WISE}, Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and SDSS DR7 photometric catalogs. From $\sim18,000$ input targets, there are {\em WISE} detections comprising 344 "naked" WDs (detection of the WD photosphere only), 1020 candidate WD+M dwarf binaries, 42 candidate WD+brown dwarf (BD) systems, 52 candidate WD+dust disk systems, and 69 targets with indeterminate infrared excess. We classified all of the detected targets through spectral energy distribution model fitting of the merged optical, near-IR, and {\em WISE} photometry. Some of these detections could be the result of contaminating sources within the large ($\approx6\arcsec$) {\em WISE} point spread function; we make a preliminary estimate for the rates of contamination for our WD+BD and WD+disk candidates, and provide notes for each target-of-interest. Each candidate presented here should be confirmed with higher angular resolution infrared imaging or infrared spectroscopy. We also present an overview of the observational characteristics of the detected WDs in the {\em WISE} photometric bands, including the relative frequencies of candidate WD+M, WD+BD, and WD+disk systems.
  • Many X-ray binaries remain undetected in the mid-infrared, a regime where emission from their compact jets is likely to dominate. Here, we report the detection of the black hole binary GX 339-4 with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) during a very bright, hard accretion state in 2010. Combined with a rich contemporaneous multiwavelength dataset, clear spectral curvature is found in the infrared, associated with the peak flux density expected from the compact jet. An optically-thin slope of ~-0.7 and a jet radiative power of >6x10^{35} erg/s (d/8 kpc)^2 are measured. A ~24 h WISE light curve shows dramatic variations in mid-infrared spectral slope on timescales at least as short as the satellite orbital period ~95 mins. There is also significant change during one pair of observations spaced by only 11 s. These variations imply that the spectral break associated with the transition from self-absorbed to optically-thin jet synchrotron radiation must be varying across the full wavelength range of ~3-22 microns that WISE is sensitive to, and more. Based on four-band simultaneous mid-infrared detections, the break lies at ~5x10^{13} Hz in at least two epochs of observation, consistent with a magnetic field B~1.5x10^4 G assuming a single-zone synchrotron emission region. The observed variability implies that either B, or the size of the acceleration zone above the jet base, are being modulated by factors of ~10 on relatively-short timescales.
  • J.W. den Herder, L. Piro, T. Ohashi, C. Kouveliotou, D.H. Hartmann, J.S. Kaastra, L. Amati, M.I. Andersen, M. Arnaud, J-L. Attéia, S. Bandler, M. Barbera, X. Barcons, S. Barthelmy, S. Basa, S. Basso, M. Boer, E. Branchini, G. Branduardi-Raymont, S. Borgani, A. Boyarsky, G. Brunetti, C. Budtz-Jorgensen, D. Burrows, N. Butler, S. Campana, E. Caroli, M. Ceballos, F. Christensen, E. Churazov, A. Comastri, L. Colasanti, R. Cole, R. Content, A. Corsi, E. Costantini, P. Conconi, G. Cusumano, J. de Plaa, A. De Rosa, M. Del Santo, S. Di Cosimo, M. De Pasquale, R. Doriese, S. Ettori, P. Evans, Y. Ezoe, L. Ferrari, H. Finger, T. Figueroa-Feliciano, P. Friedrich, R. Fujimoto, A. Furuzawa, J. Fynbo, F. Gatti, M. Galeazzi, N. Gehrels, B. Gendre, G. Ghirlanda, G. Ghisellini, M. Gilfanov, P. Giommi, M. Girardi, J. Grindlay, M. Cocchi, O. Godet, M. Guedel, F. Haardt, R. den Hartog, I. Hepburn, W. Hermsen, J. Hjorth, H. Hoekstra, A. Holland, A. Hornstrup, A. van der Horst, A. Hoshino, J. in 't Zand, K. Irwin, Y. Ishisaki, P. Jonker, T. Kitayama, H. Kawahara, N. Kawai, R. Kelley, C. Kilbourne, P. de Korte, A. Kusenko, I. Kuvvetli, M. Labanti, C. Macculi, R. Maiolino, M. Mas Hesse, K. Matsushita, P. Mazzotta, D. McCammon, M. Méndez, R. Mignani, T. Mineo, K. Mitsuda, R. Mushotzky, S. Molendi, L. Moscardini, L. Natalucci, F. Nicastro, P. O'Brien, J. Osborne, F. Paerels, M. Page, S. Paltani, K. Pedersen, E. Perinati, T. Ponman, E. Pointecouteau, P. Predehl, S. Porter, A. Rasmussen, G. Rauw, H. Röttgering, M. Roncarelli, P. Rosati, E. Quadrini, O. Ruchayskiy, R. Salvaterra, S. Sasaki, K. Sato, S. Savaglio, J. Schaye, S. Sciortino, M. Shaposhnikov, R. Sharples, K. Shinozaki, D. Spiga, R. Sunyaev, Y. Suto, Y. Takei, N. Tanvir, M. Tashiro, T. Tamura, Y. Tawara, E. Troja, M. Tsujimoto, T. Tsuru, P. Ubertini, J. Ullom, E. Ursino, F. Verbunt, F. van de Voort, M. Viel, S. Wachter, D. Watson, M. Weisskopf, N. Werner, N. White, R. Willingale, R. Wijers, N. Yamasaki, K. Yoshikawa, S. Zane
    ORIGIN is a proposal for the M3 mission call of ESA aimed at the study of metal creation from the epoch of cosmic dawn. Using high-spectral resolution in the soft X-ray band, ORIGIN will be able to identify the physical conditions of all abundant elements between C and Ni to red-shifts of z=10, and beyond. The mission will answer questions such as: When were the first metals created? How does the cosmic metal content evolve? Where do most of the metals reside in the Universe? What is the role of metals in structure formation and evolution? To reach out to the early Universe ORIGIN will use Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) to study their local environments in their host galaxies. This requires the capability to slew the satellite in less than a minute to the GRB location. By studying the chemical composition and properties of clusters of galaxies we can extend the range of exploration to lower redshifts (z ~ 0.2). For this task we need a high-resolution spectral imaging instrument with a large field of view. Using the same instrument, we can also study the so far only partially detected baryons in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM). The less dense part of the WHIM will be studied using absorption lines at low redshift in the spectra for GRBs.
  • With the launch of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a new era of detecting planetary debris around white dwarfs has begun with the WISE InfraRed Excesses around Degenerates (WIRED) Survey. The WIRED Survey will be sensitive to substellar objects and dusty debris around white dwarfs out to distances exceeding 100 pc, well beyond the completeness level of local WDs and covering a large fraction of known WDs detected with the SDSS DR4 white dwarf catalogue. In this paper we report an initial result of the WIRED survey, the detection of the heavily polluted hydrogen white dwarf (spectral type DAZ) GALEX J193156.8+011745 at 3.35 and 4.6 \micron. We find that the excess is consistent with either a narrow dusty ring with an inner radius of 29 $R_{\rm WD}$, outer radius of 40 $R_{\rm WD}$, and a face-on inclination, or a disk with an inclination of 70$^\circ$, an inner radius of 23 $R_{\rm WD}$, and an outer radius of 80 $R_{\rm WD}$. We also report initial optical spectroscopic monitoring of several metal lines present in the photosphere and find no variability in the line strengths or radial velocities of the lines. We rule out all but planetary mass companions to GALEX1931 out to 0.5 AU.
  • Results are presented for a Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys high-resolution imaging campaign of 90 white dwarfs with known or suspected low mass stellar and substellar companions. Of the 72 targets which remain candidate and confirmed white dwarfs with near-infrared excess, 43 are spatially resolved into two or more components, and a total of 12 systems are potentially triples. There is a possible, slight deficit of earlier spectral types (bluer colors) among the spatially unresolved companions, exactly the opposite of expectations if significant mass is transferred to the companion during the common envelope phase. Using the best available distance estimates, the low mass companions to white dwarfs exhibit a bimodal distribution in projected separation. This result supports the hypothesis that during the giant phases of the white dwarf progenitor, any unevolved companions either migrate inward to short periods of hours to days, or outward to periods of hundreds to thousands of years. No intermediate projected separations of a few to several AU are found among these pairs. However, a few double M dwarfs (within triples) are spatially resolved in this range, empirically demonstrating that such separations were readily detectable among the binaries with white dwarfs. A straightforward and testable prediction emerges: all spatially unresolved, low mass stellar and substellar companions to white dwarfs should be in short period orbits. This result has implications for substellar companion and planetary orbital evolution during the post-main sequence lifetime of their stellar hosts.
  • On 2010 March 19, the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope triggered on a short burst with temporal and spectral characteristics similar to those of Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts. The source location, however, did not coincide with any known SGR. Subsequent observations of the source error box with the Swift/X-ray Telescope and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) led to the discovery of a new X-ray source, with a spin period of 7.56 s, confirming SGR J1833-0832 as a new magnetar. Based on our detailed temporal and spectral analyses, we show that the new SGR is rapidly spinning down (4 x 10^{-12} s/s) and find an inferred dipole magnetic field of 1.8 x 10^{14} G. We also show that the X-ray flux of SGR J1833-0832 remained constant for approximately 20 days following the burst and then started to decline. We derived an accurate location of the source with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and we searched for a counterpart in deep optical and infrared observations of SGR J1833-0832, and for radio pulsed emission with the Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope. Finally, we compare the spectral and temporal properties of the source to the other magnetar candidates.
  • We have discovered a large number of circular and elliptical shells at 24 microns around luminous central sources with the MIPS instrument on-board the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our archival follow-up effort has revealed 90% of these circumstellar shells to be previously unknown. The majority of the shells is only visible at 24 microns, but many of the central stars are detected at multiple wavelengths from the mid- to the near-IR regime. The general lack of optical counterparts, however, indicates that these sources represent a population of highly obscured objects. We obtained optical and near-IR spectroscopic observations of the central stars and find most of these objects to be massive stars. In particular, we identify a large population of sources that we argue represents a narrow evolutionary phase, closely related or identical to the LBV stage of massive stellar evolution.
  • On 2009 June 5, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope triggered on two short, and relatively dim bursts with spectral properties similar to Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts. Independent localizations of the bursts by triangulation with the Konus-RF and with the Swift satellite, confirmed their origin from the same, previously unknown, source. The subsequent discovery of X-ray pulsations with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), confirmed the magnetar nature of the new source, SGR J0418+5729. We describe here the Fermi/GBM observations, the discovery and the localization of this new SGR, and our infrared and Chandra X-ray observations. We also present a detailed temporal and spectral study of the two GBM bursts. SGR J0418+5729 is the second source discovered in the same region of the sky in the last year, the other one being SGR J0501+4516. Both sources lie in the direction of the galactic anti-center and presumably at the nearby distance of ~2 kpc (assuming they reside in the Perseus arm of our galaxy). The near-threshold GBM detection of bursts from SGR J0418+5729 suggests that there may be more such dim SGRs throughout our galaxy, possibly exceeding the population of bright SGRs. Finally, using sample statistics, we conclude that the implications of the new SGR discovery on the number of observable active magnetars in our galaxy at any given time is <10, in agreement with our earlier estimates.
  • SGR J1550-5418 (previously known as AXP 1E 1547.0-5408 or PSR J1550-5418) went into three active bursting episodes in 2008 October and in 2009 January and March, emitting hundreds of typical Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts in soft gamma-rays. The second episode was especially intense, and our untriggered burst search on Fermi/GBM data (8-1000 keV) revealed ~450 bursts emitted over 24 hours during the peak of this activity. Using the GBM data, we identified a ~150-s-long enhanced persistent emission during 2009 January 22 that exhibited intriguing timing and spectral properties: (i) clear pulsations up to ~110 keV at the spin period of the neutron star (P ~ 2.07 s, the fastest of all magnetars), (ii) an additional (to a power-law) blackbody component required for the enhanced emission spectra with kT ~ 17 keV, (iii) pulsed fraction that is strongly energy dependent and highest in the 50-74 keV energy band. A total isotropic-equivalent energy emitted during this enhanced emission is estimated to be 2.9 x 10^{40} (D/5 kpc)^2 erg. The estimated area of the blackbody emitting region of ~0.046(D/5 kpc)^2 km^2 (roughly a few x 10^{-5} of the neutron star area) is the smallest "hot spot" ever measured for a magnetar and most likely corresponds to the size of magnetically-confined plasma near the neutron star surface.
  • Magnetars are a special class of slowly rotating neutron stars with extremely strong magnetic fields -- at least an order of magnitude larger than those of the "normal" radio pulsars. The potential evolutionary links and differences between these two types of objects are still unknown; recent studies, however, have provided circumstantial evidence connecting magnetars with very massive progenitor stars. Here we report the discovery of an infrared elliptical ring or shell surrounding the magnetar SGR 1900+14. The appearance and energetics of the ring are difficult to interpret within the framework of the progenitor's stellar mass loss or the subsequent evolution of the supernova remnant. We suggest instead that a dust-free cavity was produced in the magnetar environment by the giant flare emitted by the source in August 1998. Considering the total energy released in the flare, the theoretical dust--destruction radius matches well with the observed dimensions of the ring. We conclude that SGR 1900+14 is unambiguously associated with a cluster of massive stars, thereby solidifying the link between magnetars and massive stars.
  • We describe the absolute calibration of the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 160 micron channel. After the on-orbit discovery of a near-IR ghost image that dominates the signal for sources hotter than about 2000 K, we adopted a strategy utilizing asteroids to transfer the absolute calibrations of the MIPS 24 and 70 micron channels to the 160 micron channel. Near-simultaneous observations at all three wavelengths are taken, and photometry at the two shorter wavelengths is fit using the Standard Thermal Model. The 160 micron flux density is predicted from those fits and compared with the observed 160 micron signal to derive the conversion from instrumental units to surface brightness. The calibration factor we derive is 41.7 MJy/sr/MIPS160 (MIPS160 being the instrumental units). The scatter in the individual measurements of the calibration factor, as well as an assesment of the external uncertainties inherent in the calibration, lead us to adopt an uncertainty of 5.0 MJy/sr/MIPS160 (12%) for the absolute uncertainty on the 160 micron flux density of a particular source as determined from a single measurement. For sources brighter than about 2 Jy, non-linearity in the response of the 160 micron detectors produces an under-estimate of the flux density: for objects as bright as 4 Jy, measured flux densities are likely to be ~20% too low. This calibration has been checked against that of ISO (using ULIRGS) and IRAS (using IRAS-derived diameters), and is consistent with those at the 5% level.
  • We present the stellar calibrator sample and the conversion from instrumental to physical units for the 24 micron channel of the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS). The primary calibrators are A stars, and the calibration factor based on those stars is 4.54*10^{-2} MJy sr^{-1} (DN/s)^{-1}, with a nominal uncertainty of 2%. We discuss the data-reduction procedures required to attain this accuracy; without these procdures, the calibration factor obtained using the automated pipeline at the Spitzer Science Center is 1.6% +/- 0.6% lower. We extend this work to predict 24 micron flux densities for a sample of 238 stars which covers a larger range of flux densities and spectral types. We present a total of 348 measurements of 141 stars at 24 micron. This sample covers a factor of ~460 in 24 micron flux density, from 8.6 mJy up to 4.0 Jy. We show that the calibration is linear over that range with respect to target flux and background level. The calibration is based on observations made using 3-second exposures; a preliminary analysis shows that the calibration factor may be 1% and 2% lower for 10- and 30-second exposures, respectively. We also demonstrate that the calibration is very stable: over the course of the mission, repeated measurements of our routine calibrator, HD 159330, show a root-mean-square scatter of only 0.4%. Finally, we show that the point spread function (PSF) is well measured and allows us to calibrate extended sources accurately; Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) and MIPS measurements of a sample of nearby galaxies are identical within the uncertainties.
  • We report on our analysis of a 20 ksec Chandra X-ray observation of the quasi-persistent neutron star soft X-ray transient (SXT) 1M1716-315 in quiescence. Only one source was detected in the HEAO-I error region. Its luminosity is 1.6E32-1.3E33 erg s-1. In this the range is dominated by the uncertainty in the source distance. The source spectrum is well described by an absorbed soft spectrum, e.g. a neutron star atmosphere or black body model. No optical or near-infrared counterpart is present at the location of the X-ray source, down to a magnitude limit of I> 23.5 and K_s> 19.5. The positional evidence, the soft X-ray spectrum together with the optical and near-infrared non-detections provide strong evidence that this source is the quiescent neutron star SXT. The source is 10-100 times too bright in X-rays in order to be explained by stellar coronal X-ray emission. Together with the interstellar extinction measured in outburst and estimates for the source distance, the reported optical and near-infrared limit give an upper limit on the absolute magnitude of the counterpart of I>8.6 and K_s>5.1. This implies that the system is either an ultra-compact X-ray binary having P_orb<1 hr or the companion star is an M-dwarf. We reconstructed the long term X-ray lightcurve of the source. 1M1716-315 has been active for more than 12 years before returning to quiescence, the reported Chandra observation started 16.9+-4.1 years after the outburst ended.
  • We present Spitzer Space Telescope photometry of six short-period polars, EF Eri, V347 Pav, VV Pup, V834 Cen, GG Leo, and MR Ser. We have combined the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (3.6 -8.0 microns) data with the 2MASS J, H, K_s photometry to construct the spectral energy distributions of these systems from the near- to mid-IR (1.235 - 8 microns). We find that five out of the six polars have flux densities in the mid-IR that are substantially in excess of the values expected from the stellar components alone. We have modeled the observed SEDs with a combination of contributions from the white dwarf, secondary star, and either cyclotron emission or a cool, circumbinary dust disk to fill in the long-wavelength excess. We find that a circumbinary dust disk is the most likely cause of the 8 micron excess in all cases, but we have been unable to rule out the specific (but unlikely) case of completely optically thin cyclotron emission as the source of the observed 8 micron flux density. While both model components can generate enough flux at 8 microns, neither dust nor cyclotron emission alone can match the excess above the stellar components at all wavelengths. A model combining both cyclotron and dust contributions, possibly with some accretion-generated flux in the near-IR, is probably required, but our observed SEDs are not sufficiently well-sampled to constrain such a complicated model. If the 8 micron flux density is caused by the presence of a circumbinary dust disk, then our estimates of the masses of these disks are many orders of magnitude below the mass required to affect CV evolution.
  • We present detailed spectral and timing analysis of the hard x-ray transient IGR J16358-4726 using multi-satellite archival observations. A study of the source flux time history over 6 years, suggests that lower luminosity transient outbursts can be occuring in intervals of at most 1 year. Joint spectral fits of the higher luminosity outburst using simultaneous Chandra/ACIS and INTEGRAL/ISGRI data reveal a spectrum well described by an absorbed power law model with a high energy cut-off plus an Fe line. We detected the 1.6 hour pulsations initially reported using Chandra/ACIS also in the INTEGRAL/ISGRI light curve and in subsequent XMM-Newton observations. Using the INTEGRAL data we identified a spin up of 94 s (dP/dt = 1.6E-4), which strongly points to a neutron star nature for IGR J16358-4726. Assuming that the spin up is due to disc accretion, we estimate that the source magnetic field ranges between 10^13 - 10^15 G, depending on its distance, possibly supporting a magnetar nature for IGR J16358-4726.
  • First results are presented for a Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys snapshot study of white dwarfs with likely red dwarf companions. Of 48 targets observed and analyzed so far, 27 are totally or partially resolved into two or more components, while an additional 15 systems are almost certainly unresolved binaries. These results provide the first direct empirical evidence for a bimodal distribution of orbital separations among binary systems containing at least one white dwarf.
  • We present new Chandra observations of the low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) X1624-490, X1702-429, and X1715-321 and the search for their Infrared (IR) counterparts. We also report on early results from our dedicated IR survey of LMXBs. The goal of this program is to investigate whether IR counterparts can be identified through unique IR colors and to trace the origin of the IR emission in these systems.
  • We report on the precise localization of the low mass X-ray binaries X1624-490 and X1702-429 with the Chandra HRC-I. We determine the best positions to be 16:28:02.825 -49:11:54.61 (J2000) and 17:06:15.314 -43:02:08.69 (J2000) for X1624-490 and X1702-429, respectively, with the nominal Chandra positional uncertainty of 0.6". We also obtained deep IR observations of the fields of these sources in an effort to identify the IR counterparts. A single, faint (Ks=18.3 +/- 0.1) source is visible inside the Chandra error circle of X1624-490, and we propose this source as its IR counterpart. For X1702-429, a Ks=16.5 +/- 0.07 source is visible at the edge of the Chandra error circle. The brightness of both counterpart candidates is comparable to that of other low mass X-ray binary IR counterparts when corrected for extinction and distance.
  • We present precise localizations of AXP 1E1841-045 and SGR 1627-41 with Chandra. We obtained new infrared observations of SGR 1627-41 and reanalyzed archival observations of AXP 1E1841-045 in order to refine their positions and search for infrared counterparts. A faint source is detected inside the error circle of AXP 1E1841-045. In the case of SGR 1627-41, several sources are located within the error radius of the X-ray position and we discuss the likelihood of one of them being the counterpart. We compare the properties of our candidates to those of other known AXP and SGR counterparts. We find that the counterpart candidates for SGR 1627-41 and SGR 1806-20 would have to be intrinsically much brighter than AXPs to have detectable counterparts with the observational limits currently available for these sources. To confirm the reported counterpart of SGR 1806-20, we obtained new IR observations during the July 2003 burst activation of the source. No brightening of the suggested counterpart is detected, implying that the counterpart of SGR 1806-20 remains yet to be identified.