• The influence of a supersonic projectile on a three-dimensional complex plasma is studied. Micron sized particles in a low-temperature plasma formed a large undisturbed system in the new 'Zyflex' chamber during microgravity conditions. A supersonic probe particle excited a Mach cone with Mach number M $\approx$ 1.5 - 2 and double Mach cone structure in the large weakly damped particle cloud. The speed of sound is measured with different methods and particle charge estimations are compared to calculations from standard theories. The high image resolution enables the study of Mach cones in microgravity on the single particle level of a three-dimensional complex plasma and gives insight to the dynamics. A heating of the microparticles is discovered behind the supersonic projectile but not in the flanks of the Mach cone.
  • The full melting of a two-dimensional plasma crystal was induced in a principally stable monolayer by localized laser stimulation. Two distinct behaviors of the crystal after laser stimulation were observed depending on the amount of injected energy: (i) below a well-defined threshold, the laser melted area recrystallized; (ii) above the threshold, it expanded outwards in a similar fashion to mode-coupling instability induced melting, rapidly destroying the crystalline order of the whole complex plasma monolayer. The reported experimental observations are due to the fluid mode-coupling instability which can pump energy into the particle monolayer at a rate surpassing the heat transport and damping rates in the energetic localized melted spot, resulting in its further growth. This behavior exhibits remarkable similarities with impulsive spot heating and thermal runaway (explosion) in ordinary reactive matter.
  • An interaction of upstream extra particles with a monolayer highly-ordered complex plasma is studied. A principally new abnormal turbulent wake formed behind the supersonic upstream particle is discovered. An anomalous type of the turbulence wake clearly manifests in anomalously low thermal diffusivity and two orders of magnitude larger particle kinetic temperature compared to that of the 'normal' wake (Mach cone) observed by Du et al [Europhys. Lett. 99, 55001 (2012)].
  • The collective motion of dust particles during the mode-coupling induced melting of a two-dimensional plasma crystal is explored in molecular dynamics simulations. The crystal is compressed horizontally by an anisotropic confinement. This compression leads to an asymmetric triggering of the mode-coupling instability which is accompanied by alternating chains of in-phase and anti-phase oscillating particles. A new order parameter is proposed to quantify the synchronization with respect to different directions of the crystal. Depending on the orientation of the confinement anisotropy, mode-coupling instability and synchronized motion are observed in one or two directions. Notably, the synchronization is found to be direction-dependent. The good agreement with experiments suggests that the confinement anisotropy can be used to explain the observed synchronization process.
  • Structure of Mach cones in a crystalline complex plasma has been studied experimentally using an intensity sensitive imaging, which resolved particle motion in three dimensions. This revealed a previously unknown out-of-plane cone structure, which appeared due to excitation of the vertical wave mode. The complex plasma consisted of micron sized particles forming a monolayer in a plasma sheath of a gas discharge. Fast particles, spontaneously moving under the monolayer, created Mach cones with multiple structures. The in-plane cone structure was due to compressional and shear lattice waves.
  • Two-dimensional plasma crystals are characterized by a strong up-and-down asymmetry not only due to gravity but also due to the presence of plasma flow at the location of particles. We study for the first time the interaction of a single-layer plasma crystal with charged extra particles located above it (upstream of the flow of ions). Upstream extra particles tend to move between the rows of particles in the crystal, accelerate to supersonic speeds, and excite attraction-dominated Mach cones and wakes in the crystal.
  • Experimental results on an auto-oscillatory pattern observed in a complex plasma are presented. The experiments are performed with an argon plasma which is produced under microgravity conditions using a capacitively-coupled rf discharge at low power and gas pressure. The observed intense wave activity in the complex plasma cloud correlates well with the low-frequency modulation of the discharge voltage and current and is initiated by periodic void contractions. Particle migrations forced by the waves are of long-range repulsive and attractive character.
  • The plasma is generated in a low frequency glow discharge within an elongated glass tube oriented vertically. The dust particles added to the plasma are confined above the heater and form counter-rotating clouds close to the tube centre. The shape of the clouds and the velocity field of the conveying dust particles are determined. The forces acting on the particles are calculated. It is shown that convection of the dust is affected by the convective gas motion which is triggered, in turn, by thermal creep of the gas along the inhomogeneously heated walls of the tube.
  • Experimental results on the dislocation dynamics in a two-dimensional plasma crystal are presented. Edge dislocations were created in pairs in lattice locations where the internal shear stress exceeded a threshold and then moved apart in the glide plane at a speed higher than the sound speed of shear waves, $C_T$. The experimental system, a plasma crystal, allowed observation of this process at an atomistic (kinetic) level. The early stage of this process is identified as a stacking fault. At a later stage, supersonically moving dislocations generated shear-wave Mach cones.