• Based mostly on stellar models which do not include rotation, CO white dwarfs which accrete helium at rates of about $\sim 10^{-8}~\mathrm{M}_\odot/\mathrm{yr}$ have been put forward as candidate progenitors for a number of transient astrophysical phenomena, including supernovae of Type Ia, and the peculiar and fainter Type Iax supernovae. Here we study the impact of accretion-induced spin-up including the subsequent magnetic field generation, angular momentum transport, and viscous heating on the white dwarf evolution up to the point of helium ignition. We resolve the structure of the helium accreting white dwarf models with a one dimensional Langrangian hydrodynamic code, modified to include rotational and magnetic effects. We find magnetic angular momentum transport, which leads to quasi solid-body rotation, profoundly impacts the evolution of the white dwarf models. Our rotating lower mass ($0.54$ and $0.82~\mathrm{M}_\odot$) models accrete up to 50\% more mass up to ignition compared to the non-rotating case and the opposite for our more massive models. Furthermore, we find that rotation leads to up to 10-times smaller helium ignition densities, except for the lowest adopted initial white dwarf mass. Ignition densities of order $10^6\,\mathrm{g/cm}^3$ are only found for the lowest accretion rates and for large amounts of accreted helium $\gtrsim 0.4\,\mathrm{M}_\odot$. However, correspondingly massive donor stars would transfer mass at much higher rates. We expect explosive He-shell burning to mostly occur as deflagrations and at $\dot{M}>2\cdot10^{-8}~\mathrm{M}_\odot/\mathrm{yr}$, regardless of white dwarf mass. Our results imply that helium accretion onto CO white dwarfs at the considered rates is unlikely to lead to explosions of the CO core or to classical Type,Ia supernovae, but may instead produce events like faint and fast hydrogen-free supernovae.
  • Most massive stars, the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae, are in close binary systems and may interact with their companion through mass transfer or merging. We undertake a population synthesis study to compute the delay-time distribution of core-collapse supernovae, that is, the supernova rate versus time following a starburst, taking into account binary interactions. We test the systematic robustness of our results by running various simulations to account for the uncertainties in our standard assumptions. We find that a significant fraction, $15^{+9}_{-8}$%, of core-collapse supernovae are `late', that is, they occur 50-200 Myrs after birth, when all massive single stars have already exploded. These late events originate predominantly from binary systems with at least one, or, in most cases, with both stars initially being of intermediate mass ($4-8M_{\odot}$). The main evolutionary channels that contribute often involve either the merging of the initially more massive primary star with its companion or the engulfment of the remaining core of the primary by the expanding secondary that has accreted mass at an earlier evolutionary stage. Also, the total number of core-collapse supernovae increases by $14^{+15}_{-14}$% because of binarity for the same initial stellar mass. The high rate implies that we should have already observed such late core-collapse supernovae, but have not recognized them as such. We argue that $\phi$ Persei is a likely progenitor and that eccentric neutron star - white dwarf systems are likely descendants. Late events can help explain the discrepancy in the delay-time distributions derived from supernova remnants in the Magellanic Clouds and extragalactic type Ia events, lowering the contribution of prompt Ia events. We discuss ways to test these predictions and speculate on the implications for supernova feedback in simulations of galaxy evolution.
  • We present new binary stellar evolution models that include the effects of tidal forces, rotation, and magnetic torques with the goal of testing Planetary Nebulae (PNe) shaping via binary interaction. We explore whether tidal interaction with a companion can spin up the AGB envelope. To do so we have selected binary systems with main sequence masses of 2.5 \Mo and of 0.8 \Mo and evolve them allowing initial separations of 5, 6, 7, and 8 AU. The binary stellar evolution models have been computed all the way to the PNe formation phase or until Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) is reached, whatever happens first. We show that with initial separations of 7 and 8 AU, the binary avoids entering into RLOF, and the AGB star reaches moderate rotational velocities at the surface ($\sim 3.5 $ and $\sim 2 $ \kms respectively) during the inter-pulse phases, but after the thermal pulses it drops to a final rotational velocity of only $\sim 0.03 $ \kms. For the closest binary separations explored, 5 and 6 AU, the AGB star reaches rotational velocities of $\sim 6 $ and $\sim 4 $ \kms respectively when the RLOF is initiated. We conclude that the detached binary models that avoid entering the RLOF phase during the AGB will not shape bipolar PNe, since the acquired angular momentum is lost via the wind during the last two thermal pulses. This study rules out tidal spin-up in non-contact binaries as a sufficient condition to form bipolar PNe.
  • Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been an important tool for astronomy for quite some time; however, the nature of their progenitors remains somewhat mysterious. Recent theoretical studies indicated the possibility of producing thermonuclear detonations of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs (CO WDs) at masses less than the Chandrasekhar mass through accretion of helium-rich matter, which would, depending on mass accretion rate, mass, and initial temperature of the WD, spectrally resemble either a normal SN Ia or a peculiar one. This study aims to further resolve the state of binary systems comprised of a sub-Chandrasekhar-mass CO WD and a helium star at the point where an accretion-induced detonation occurs and constrains the part of the initial parameter space where this kind of phenomenon is possible. Preexisting data obtained through simulations of single, constantly accreting CO WDs is used as an indicator for the behavior of new binary models in which the WD is treated as a point mass and which include the non-degenerate partner as a fully resolved stellar model. We parameterize the ignition of the accumulated helium layer, changes in the WD temperature, and changes in the CO core mass depending on the mass transfer rate. The initial conditions allowing for detonation do not form a single contiguous area in the parameter space, whose shape is profoundly influenced by the behavior of the donor star. Mass loss due to Nova outbursts acts in favor of detonation. According to our criteria, about 10% of the detonations in this study can be expected to show spectra consistent with ordinary SNe Ia; the rest exhibit peculiar features.
  • Massive rotating single stars with an initial metal composition appropriate for the dwarf galaxy I Zw 18 ([Fe/H]=$-$1.7) are modelled during hydrogen burning for initial masses of 9-300 M$_{\odot}$ and rotational velocities of 0-900 km s$^{-1}$. Internal mixing processes in these models were calibrated based on an observed sample of OB-type stars in the Magellanic Clouds. Even moderately fast rotators, which may be abundant at this metallicity, are found to undergo efficient mixing induced by rotation resulting in quasi chemically-homogeneous evolution. These homogeneously-evolving models reach effective temperatures of up to 90 kK during core hydrogen burning. This, together with their moderate mass-loss rates, make them Transparent Wind Ultraviolet INtense stars (TWUIN star), and their expected numbers might explain the observed HeII ionizing photon flux in I Zw 18 and other low-metallicity HeII galaxies. Our slowly rotating stars above $\sim$80 M$_{\odot}$ evolve into late B- to M-type supergiants during core hydrogen burning, with visual magnitudes up to 19$^{\mathrm{m}}$ at the distance of I Zw 18. Both types of stars, TWUIN stars and luminous late-type supergiants, are only predicted at low metallicity. Massive star evolution at low metallicity is shown to differ qualitatively from that in metal-rich environments. Our grid can be used to interpret observations of local star-forming dwarf galaxies and high-redshift galaxies, as well as the metal-poor components of our Milky Way and its globular clusters.
  • The B fields in OB stars (BOB) survey is an ESO large programme collecting spectropolarimetric observations for a large number of early-type stars in order to study the occurrence rate, properties, and ultimately the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars. As of July 2014, a total of 98 objects were observed over 20 nights with FORS2 and HARPSpol. Our preliminary results indicate that the fraction of magnetic OB stars with an organised, detectable field is low. This conclusion, now independently reached by two different surveys, has profound implications for any theoretical model attempting to explain the field formation in these objects. We discuss in this contribution some important issues addressed by our observations (e.g., the lower bound of the field strength) and the discovery of some remarkable objects.
  • So called superluminous supernovae have been recently discovered in the local Universe. It appears possible that some of them originate from stellar explosions induced by the pair instability mechanism. Recent stellar evolution models also predict pair instability supernovae (PISNe) from very massive stars at fairly high metallicities (i.e. Z~0.004). We provide supernova (SN) models and synthetic light curves for two progenitor models, a 150 Msun red-supergiant and a 250 Msun yellow-supergiant at a metallicity of Z=0.001, for which the evolution from the main sequence to collapse, and the initiation of the PISN itself, has been previously computed in a realistic and self-consistent way. We are using the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA to describe the SN evolution of both models over a time frame of about 500 days. We describe the shock-breakout phases of both SNe which are characterized by a higher luminosity, a longer duration and a lower effective temperature than those of ordinary SNeIIP. We derive the bolometric as well as the U, B, V, R and I light curves of our PISN models, which show a long-lasting plateau phase with maxima at Mbol=-19.3 mag and -21.3 mag for our lower and higher mass model, respectively. We also describe the photospheric composition and velocity as function of time. We conclude that the light curve of the explosion of our initially 150 Msun star resembles those of relatively bright SNeIIP, whereas its photospheric velocity at early times is smaller. Its 56Ni mass of 0.04 Msun also falls well into the range found in ordinary core collapse SNe. The light curve and photospheric velocity of our 250 Msun models has a striking resemblance with that of the superluminous SN2007bi, strengthening its interpretation as PISN. We conclude that PISNe may occur more frequently in the local universe than previously assumed.
  • We have computed new stellar evolution models that include the effects of rotation and magnetic torques under different hypothesis. The goal is to test if a single star can sustain in the envelope the rotational velocities needed for the magneto hydrodynamical (MHD) simulations to shape bipolar Planetary Nebulae (PNe) when the high mass-loss rates take place. Stellar evolution models with main sequence masses of 2.5 and 5 Mo, and initial rotational velocities of 250 km/s have been followed all the way to the PNe formation phase. We find that stellar cores have to be spun down using magnetic torques in order to reproduce the rotation rates observed for white dwarfs. During the asymptotic giant branch phase and beyond, the magnetic braking of the core has a practically null effect in increasing the rotational velocity of the envelope since the stellar angular momentum is removed efficiently by the wind. We have, as well, tested best possible case scenarios in rather non-physical contexts to give enough angular momentum to the envelope. We find that we cannot get the envelope of a single star rotating at the speeds needed by the MHD simulations to form bipolar PNe. We conclude that single stellar rotators are unlikely to be the progenitors of bipolar PNe under the current MHD model paradigm.
  • Recent discoveries of weak and fast optical transients raise the question of their origin. We investigate the minimum ejecta mass associated with core-collapse supernovae (SNe) of Type Ic. We show that mass transfer from a helium star to a compact companion can produce an ultra-stripped core which undergoes iron core collapse and leads to an extremely fast and faint SN Ic. In this Letter, a detailed example is presented in which the pre-SN stellar mass is barely above the Chandrasekhar limit, resulting in the ejection of only ~0.05-0.20 M_sun of material and the formation of a low-mass neutron star. We compute synthetic light curves of this case and demonstrate that SN 2005ek could be explained by our model. We estimate that the fraction of such ultra-stripped to all SNe could be as high as 0.001-0.01. Finally, we argue that the second explosion in some double neutron star systems (for example, the double pulsar PSR J0737-3039B) was likely associated with an ultra-stripped SN Ic.
  • (shortened) The first couple of stellar generations may have been massive, of order 100 Msun, and to have played a dominant role in galaxy formation and the chemical enrichment of the early Universe. Some fraction of these objects may have died as pair-instability supernovae or gamma-ray bursts. The winds if these stars may have played an important role in determining these outcomes. As the winds are driven by radiation pressure on spectral lines, their strengths are expected to vary with metallicity. Until now, most mass-loss predictions for metal-poor O-type stars have assumed a scaled-down solar-abundance pattern. However, Population III evolutionary tracks show significant surface enrichment through rotational mixing of CNO-processed material, because even metal-poor stars switch to CNO-burning early on. We address the question of whether the CNO surface enhanced self-enrichment in the first few generations of stars could impact their mass-loss properties. For this, we employ Monte Carlo simulations to establish the local line-force and solve for the momentum equation of the stellar outflow, testing whether an outflow can actually be established by assessing the net acceleration at the sonic point of the flow. Stellar evolution models of rotating metal-poor stars are used to specify the surface chemical composition, focussing on the phases of early enrichment. We find that the mass-loss rates of CNO enhanced metal-poor stars are higher than those of non-enriched stars, but they are much lower than those rates where the CNO abundance is included in the total abundance Z. We present a heuristic formula that provides mass-loss estimates for CNO-dominated winds in relation to scaled-down solar abundances.
  • The progenitors of many Type II supernovae have been observationally identified but the search for Type Ibc supernova (SN Ibc) progenitors has thus far been unsuccessful, despite the expectation that they are luminous Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. We investigate how the evolution of massive helium stars affects their visual appearances, and discuss the implications for the detectability of SN Ibc progenitors. Massive WR stars that rapidly lose their helium envelopes through stellar-wind mass-loss end their lives when their effective temperatures -- related to their hydrostatic surfaces -- exceed about 150kK.At their pre-supernova stage, their surface properties resemble those of hot Galactic WR stars of WO sub-type. These are visually faint with narrow-band visual magnitudes Mv = -1.5 ~ -2.5, despite their high bolometric luminosities (log L/Lsun = 5.6 ~ 5.7), compared to the bulk of Galactic WR stars (Mv < -4). In contrast, relatively low-mass helium stars that retain a thick helium envelope appear fairly bright in optical bands, depending on the final masses and the history of the envelope expansion during the late evolutionary stages. We conclude that SNe Ibc observations have so far not provided strong constraints on progenitor bolometric luminosities and masses, even with the deepest searches. We also argue that Ic progenitors are more challenging to identify than Ib progenitors in any optical images.
  • [Abridged] We present a new grid of massive population III star models including the effects of rotation on the stellar structure and chemical mixing, and magnetic torques for the transport of angular momentum. Based on the grid, we also present a phase diagram for the expected final fates of rotating massive Pop III stars. Our non-rotating models become redder than the previous models in the literature, given the larger overshooting parameter adopted in this study. In particular, convective dredge-up of the helium core material into the hydrogen envelope is observed in our non-rotating very massive star models (>~200 Msun), which is potentially important for the chemical yields. On the other hand, the stars become bluer and more luminous with a higher rotational velocity. With the Spruit-Tayler dynamo, our models with a sufficiently high initial rotational velocity can reach the critical rotation earlier and lose more mass as a result, compared to the previous models without magnetic fields. The most dramatic effect of rotation is found with the so-called chemically homogeneous evolution (CHE), which is observed for a limited mass and rotational velocity range. CHE has several important consequences: 1) Both primary nitrogen and ionizing photons are abundantly produced. 2) Conditions for gamma-ray burst progenitors are fulfilled for an initial mass range of 13 - 84 Msun. 3) Pair instability supernovae of type Ibc are expected for 84 -190 Msun and 4) Both a pulsational pair instability supernova and a GRB may occur from the same progenitor of about 56 - 84 Msun, which might significantly influence the consequent GRB afterglow. We find that CHE does not occur for very massive stars (> 190 Msun), in which case the hydrogen envelope expands to the red-supergiant phase and the final angular momentum is too low to make any explosive event powered by rotation.
  • We highlight the role of the light elements (Li, Be, B) in the evolution of massive single and binary stars, which is largely restricted to a diagnostic value, and foremost so for the element boron. However, we show that the boron surface abundance in massive early type stars contains key information about their foregoing evolution which is not obtainable otherwise. In particular, it allows to constrain internal mixing processes and potential previous mass transfer event for binary stars (even if the companion has disappeared). It may also help solving the mystery of the slowly rotating nitrogen-rich massive main sequence stars.
  • We follow the bright, highly energetic afterglow of Swift-discovered GRB 080721 at z=2.591 out to 36 days or 3e6 s since the trigger in the optical and X-ray bands. We do not detect a break in the late-time light curve inferring a limit on the opening angle of theta_j >= 7.3 deg and setting tight constraints on the total energy budget of the burst of E_gamma >= 9.9e51 erg within the fireball model. To obey the fireball model closure relations the GRB jet must be expanding into a homogeneous surrounding medium and likely lies behind a significant column of dust. The energy constraint we derive can be used as observational input for models of the progenitors of long gamma-ray bursts: we discuss how such high collimation-corrected energies could be accommodated with certain parameters of the standard massive star core-collapse models. We can, however, most probably rule out a magnetar progenitor for this GRB which would require 100% efficiency to reach the observed total energy.
  • We study the convection zones in the outer envelope of hot massive stars which are caused by opacity peaks associated with iron and helium ionization. We determine the occurrence and properties of these convection zones as function of the stellar parameters. We then confront our results with observations of OB stars. A stellar evolution code is used to compute a grid of massive star models at different metallicities. In these models, the mixing length theory is used to characterize the envelope convection zones. We find the iron convection zone (FeCZ) to be more prominent for lower surface gravity, higher luminosity and higher initial metallicity. It is absent for luminosities below about $10^{3.2}\Lsun$, $10^{3.9}\Lsun$, and $10^{4.2}$\Lsun$ for the Galaxy, LMC and SMC, respectively. We map the strength of the FeCZ on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for three metallicities, and compare this with the occurrence of observational phenomena in O stars: microturbulence, non-radial pulsations, wind clumping, and line profile variability. The confirmation of all three trends for the FeCZ as function of stellar parameters by empirical microturbulent velocities argues for a physical connection between sub-photospheric convective motions and small scale stochastic velocities in the photosphere of O- and B-type stars. We further suggest that clumping in the inner parts of the winds of OB stars could be caused by the same mechanism, and that magnetic fields produced in the FeCZ could appear at the surface of OB stars as diagnosed by discrete absorption components in ultraviolet absorption lines.
  • We present results from the first extensive study of convection zones in the envelopes of hot massive stars, which are caused by opacity peaks associated with iron and helium ionization. These convective regions can be located very close to the stellar surface. Recent observations of microturbulence in massive stars from the VLT-Flames survey are in good agreement with our predictions concerning the occurrence and the strength of sub-surface convection in hot stars. We argue further that convection close to the surface may trigger clumping at the base of the stellar wind of massive stars.
  • We review the role of rotation in massive close binary systems. Rotation has been advocated as an essential ingredient in massive single star models. However, rotation clearly is most important in massive binaries where one star accretes matter from a close companion, as the resulting spin-up drives the accretor towards critical rotation. Here, we explore our understanding of this process, and its observable consequences. When accounting for these consequences, the question remains whether rotational effects in massive single stars are still needed to explain the observations.
  • The prediction of the spins of the compact remnants is a fundamental goal of the theory of stellar evolution. Here, we confront the predictions for white dwarf spins from evolutionary models including rotation with observational constraints. We perform stellar evolution calculations for stars in the mass range 1... 3$\mso$, including the physics of rotation, from the zero age main sequence into the TP-AGB stage. We calculate two sets of model sequences, with and without inclusion of magnetic fields. From the final computed models of each sequence, we deduce the angular momenta and rotational velocities of the emerging white dwarfs. While models including magnetic torques predict white dwarf rotational velocities between 2 and 10 km s$^{-1}$, those from the non-magnetic sequences are found to be one to two orders of magnitude larger, well above empirical upper limits. We find the situation analogous to that in the neutron star progenitor mass range, and conclude that magnetic torques may be required in order to understand the slow rotation of compact stellar remnants in general.
  • We discuss how rotation and binary interactions may be related to the diversity of type Ibc supernovae and long gamma-ray bursts. After presenting recent evolutionary models of massive single and binary stars including rotation, the Tayler-Spruit dynamo and binary interactions, we argue that the nature of SNe Ibc progenitors from binary systems may not significantly differ from that of single star progenitors in terms of rotation, and that most long GRB progenitors may be produced via the quasi-chemically homogeneous evolution at sub-solar metallicity. We also briefly discuss the possible role of magnetic fields generated in the convective core of a massive star for the transport of angular momentum, which is potentially important for future stellar evolution models of supernova and GRB progenitors.
  • We discuss recent models on the evolution of massive stars at very low metallicity including the effects of rotation, magnetic fields and binarity. Very metal poor stars lose very little mass and angular momentum during the main sequence evolution, and rotation plays a dominant role in their evolution. In rapidly rotating massive stars, the rotationally induced mixing time scale can be even shorter than the nuclear time scale throughout the main sequence. The consequent quasi-chemically homogeneous evolution greatly differs from the standard massive star evolution that leads to formation of red giants with strong chemical stratification. Interesting outcomes of such a new mode of evolution include the formation of rapidly rotating massive Wolf-Rayet stars that emit large amounts of ionizing photons, the formation of a long gamma-ray bursts and a hypernovae, and the production of large amounts of primary nitrogen. We show that binary interactions can further enhance the effects of rotation, as mass accretion in a close binary spins up the secondary.
  • The evolution of single stars at low metallicity has attracted a large interest, while the effect of metallicity on binary evolution remains still relatively unexplored. We study the effect of metallicity on the number of binary systems that undergo different cases of mass transfer. We find that binaries at low metallicity are more likely to start transferring mass after the onset of central helium burning, often referred to as case C mass transfer. In other words, the donor star in a metal poor binary is more likely to have formed a massive CO core before the onset of mass transfer. At solar metallicity the range of initial binary separations that result in case C evolution is very small for massive stars, because they do not expand much after the ignition of helium and because mass loss from the system by stellar winds causes the orbit to widen, preventing the primary star to fill its Roche lobe. This effect is likely to have important consequences for the metallicity dependence of the formation rate of various objects through binary evolution channels, such as long GRBs, double neutron stars and double white dwarfs.
  • The observed association of Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (LGRBs) with peculiar Type Ic supernovae gives support to Woosley`s collapsar/hypernova model, in which the GRB is produced by the collapse of the rapidly rotating core of a massive star to a black hole. The association of LGRBs with small star-forming galaxies suggests low-metallicity to be a condition for a massive star to evolve to the collapsar stage. Both completely-mixed single star models and binary star models are possible. In binary models the progenitor of the GRB is a massive helium star with a close companion. We find that tidal synchronization during core-helium burning is reached on a short timescale (less than a few millennia). However, the strong core-envelope coupling in the subsequent evolutionary stages is likely to rule out helium stars with main-sequence companions as progenitors of hypernovae/GRBs. On the other hand, helium stars in close binaries with a neutron-star or black-hole companion can, despite the strong core-envelope coupling in the post-helium burning phase, retain sufficient core angular momentum to produce a hypernova/GRB.
  • We present a binary channel for the progenitors of long gamma-ray bursts. We test the idea of producing rapidly rotating Wolf-Rayet stars in massive close binaries through mass accretion and consecutive quasi-chemically homogeneous evolution. The binary channel presented here may provide a means for massive stars to obtain the required high rotation rates. Moreover, it suggests that a possibly large fraction of long gamma-ray bursts occurs in runaway stars. This can have important observational consequences for both the positions of GRBs, and their afterglow properties.
  • Although there is strong support for the collapsar engine as the power source of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), we still do not definitively know the progenitor of these explosions. Here we review the current set of progenitor scenarios for long-duration GRBs and the observational constraints on these scenarios. Examining these, we find that single-star models cannot be the only progenitor for long-duration GRBs. Several binary progenitors can match the solid observational constraints and also have the potential to match the trends we are currently seeing in the observations. Type Ib/c supernovae are also likely to be produced primarily in binaries; we discuss the relationship between the progenitors of these explosions and those of the long-duration GRBs.
  • We present high resolution VLT UVES and low resolution FORS optical spectroscopy of supernova 2006aj and its host galaxy, associated with the nearby (z = 0.03342) gamma-ray burst GRB 060218. This host galaxy is a unique case, as it is one of the few nearby GRB host galaxies known, and it is only the second time high resolution spectra have been taken of a nearby GRB host galaxy (after GRB 980425). The resolution, wavelength range and S/N of the UVES spectrum combined with low resolution FORS spectra allow a detailed analysis of the circumburst and host galaxy environments. We analyse the emission and absorption lines in the spectrum, combining the high resolution UVES spectrum with low resolution FORS spectra and find the metallicity and chemical abundances in the host. We probe the geometry of the host by studying the emission line profiles. Our spectral analysis shows that the star forming region in the host is metal poor with 12 + log(O/H) = 7.54 (+0.17, -0.10) (~0.07 Z_sun), placing it among the most metal deficient subset of emission-line galaxies. It is also the lowest metallicity found so far for a GRB host from an emission-line analysis. Given the stellar mass of the galaxy of ~10^7 M_sun and the SFR (H alpha) = 0.065 +/- 0.005 M_sun/yr, the high specific star formation rate indicates an age for the galaxy of less than ~200 Myr. The brightest emission lines are clearly asymmetric and are well fit by two Gaussian components separated by ~22$ km/s. We detect two discrete Na I and Ca II absorption components at the same redshifts as the emission components. We tentatively interpret the two components as arising from two different starforming regions in the host, but high resolution imaging is necessary to confirm this.