• The search for Higgs bosons in both the standard model and its extensions is well under way at the Tevatron. As the integrated luminosity collected increases into the multiple inverse femptobarn range, these searches are becoming very interesting indeed. Meanwhile, the construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its associated experiments at CERN are nearing completion. In this TeV4LHC workshop, it was realized that any experience at the Tevatron with respect to backgrounds, experimental techniques and theoretical calculations that can be verified at the Tevatron which have relevance for future measurements at the LHC were important. Studies and contributions to these efforts were made in three broad categories: theoretical calculations of Higgs production and decay mechanisms; theoretical calculations and discussions pertaining to non-standard model Higgs bosons; and experimental reviews, analyses and developments at both the Tevatron and the upcoming LHC experiments. All of these contributions represent real progress towards the elucidation of the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking.
  • We study the CO and the radiocontinuum emission in an active galaxy to analyze the interplay between the central activity and the molecular gas. We present new high-resolution observations of the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) emission lines, and 3.5 cm and 20 cm radio continuum emission in the central region of the LINER/starburst galaxy NGC 6764. The galaxy has an outflow morphology in radio continuum, spatially coincident with the CO and H$\alpha$ emission, and centered slightly off the radio continuum peak at the LINER nucleus. The total molecular gas mass in the center is about 7x10^8 \msun, using a CO luminosity to total molecular gas conversion factor that is three times lower than the standard one. CO(1-0) emission is found near the boundaries of the radio continuum emission cone. The outflow has a projected expansion velocity of 25 km/s relative to the systemic velocity of NGC6764. About 4x 10^6 \msun of molecular gas is detected in the outflow. The approximate location (~1 kpc) of the dynamical inner Lindblad resonance has been derived from the rotation curve. The peak of the CO emission is slightly (< 200 pc) offset from the peak of the radio continuum. The molecular gas has most likely been ejected by the stellar winds from the recent starburst, but the CO line ratios show indication of an interaction with the AGN. The energy released by the nuclear starburst is sufficient to explain the observed outflow, even if the data cannot exclude the AGN from being the major energy source. Comparison of the outflow with hydrodynamical simulations suggests that the nuclear starburst is 3--7 Myr old and the bubble-like outflow is still confined and not freely expanding.
  • We report the discovery of very high latitude molecular gas in the edge-on spiral galaxy, NGC 5775. Emission from both the J=1-0 and 2-1 lines of 12CO is detected up to 4.8 kpc away from the mid-plane of the galaxy. NGC 5775 is known to host a number of HI supershells. The association of the molecular gas M(H2,F2) = 3.1x10^7 solar masses reported here with one of the HI supershells (labeled F2) is clear, which suggests that molecular gas may have survived the process which originally formed the supershell. Alternatively, part of the gas could have been formed in situ at high latitude from shock-compression of pre-existing HI gas. The CO J=2-1/J=1-0 line ratio of 0.34+-40% is significantly lower than unity, which suggests that the gas is excited subthermally, with gas density a few times 100 cubic cm. The molecular gas is likely in the form of cloudlets which are confined by magnetic and cosmic rays pressure. The potential energy of the gas at high latitude is found to be 2x10^56 ergs and the total (HI + H2) kinetic energy is 9x10^53 ergs. Based on the energetics of the supershell, we suggest that most of the energy in the supershell is in the form of potential energy and that the supershell is on the verge of falling and returning the gas to the disk of the galaxy.
  • We present the first high-resolution study of the disk-halo interface in an edge-on galaxy (NGC 5775) in which every component of the interstellar medium is represented and resolved. New single-dish CO J=2-1 and CO J=1-0 data, ROSAT X-ray data, and HIRES IRAS data are presented along with HI data which emphasizes the high latitude features. In conjunction with previously published radio continuum (6 and 20 cm) and H alpha data, we find spatial correlations between various ISM components in that all components of the ISM are present in the disk-halo features (except for CO for which there is insufficient spatial coverage). The HI features extend to about 7 kpc above the plane. In one case, a loop is detected in position-velocity space, and are also observed over a large velocity range. This implies that the disk-halo features represent expanding supershells. However, the shells may be incomplete and partially open-topped, suggesting that we are observing the breakup of the supershells as they traverse the disk-halo interface. There is some evidence for acceleration with z height and both redshifted and blueshifted velocities are present, although the gas which is lagging with respect to galactic rotation dominates. The radio continuum spectral index is flatter around the shell rims, suggesting that shocks may be important in these regions (thermal contribution can not account for this flattening). The H alpha emission is located interior to the HI. For feature F3, the H alpha emission forms the interior "skin" of the HI shell, yet there appears to be a minimum of in-disk star formation immediately below the feature. We present a picture of a "typical" HI supershell which accelerates and breaks up through the disk-halo interface. Such a feature is likely internally generated via an energetic event in the disk.