• We have modelled high resolution ALMA imaging of six strong gravitationally lensed galaxies detected by the Herschel Space Observatory. Our modelling recovers mass properties of the lensing galaxies and, by determining magnification factors, intrinsic properties of the lensed sub-millimetre sources. We find that the lensed galaxies all have high ratios of star formation rate to dust mass, consistent with or higher than the mean ratio for high redshift sub-millimetre galaxies and low redshift ultra-luminous infra-red galaxies. Source reconstruction reveals that most galaxies exhibit disturbed morphologies. Both the cleaned image plane data and the directly observed interferometric visibilities have been modelled, enabling comparison of both approaches. In the majority of cases, the recovered lens models are consistent between methods, all six having mass density profiles that are close to isothermal. However, one system with poor signal to noise shows mildly significant differences.
  • We present a study of the dust, stars and atomic gas (HI) in an HI-selected sample of local galaxies (z<0.035) in the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) fields. This HI-selected sample reveals a population of very high gas fraction (>80 per cent), low stellar mass sources that appear to be in the earliest stages of their evolution. We compare this sample with dust and stellar mass selected samples to study the dust and gas scaling relations over a wide range of gas fraction (proxy for evolutionary state of a galaxy). The most robust scaling relations for gas and dust are those linked to NUV-r (SSFR) and gas fraction, these do not depend on sample selection or environment. At the highest gas fractions, our additional sample shows the dust content is well below expectations from extrapolating scaling relations for more evolved sources, and dust is not a good tracer of the gas content. The specific dust mass for local galaxies peaks at a gas fraction of ~75 per cent. The atomic gas depletion time is also longer for high gas fraction galaxies, opposite to the trend found for molecular gas depletion timescale. We link this trend to the changing efficiency of conversion of HI to H2 as galaxies increase in stellar mass surface density as they evolve. Finally, we show that galaxies start out barely obscured and increase in obscuration as they evolve, yet there is no clear and simple link between obscuration and global galaxy properties.
  • The Herschel Space Observatory has had a tremendous impact on the study of extragalactic dust. Specifically, early-type galaxies (ETG) have been the focus of several studies. In this paper we combine results from two Herschel studies - a Virgo cluster study HeViCS and a broader, low-redshift H-ATLAS/GAMA study - and contrast the dust and associated properties for similar mass galaxies. This comparison is motivated by differences in results exhibited between multiple Herschel studies of early-type galaxies. A comparison between consistent modified blackbody derived dust mass is carried out, revealing strong differences between the two samples in both dust mass and dust-to-stellar mass ratio. In particular, the HeViCS sample lacks massive ETG with as high a specific dust content as found in H-ATLAS. This is most likely connected with the difference in environment for the two samples. We calculate nearest neighbour environment densities in a consistent way, showing that H-ATLAS ETG occupy sparser regions of the local Universe, whereas HeViCS ETG occupy dense regions. This is also true for ETG that are not Herschel-detected but are in the Virgo and GAMA parent samples. Spectral energy distributions are fit to the panchromatic data. From these we find that in H-ATLAS the specific star formation rate anticorrelates with stellar mass and reaches values as high as in our Galaxy. On the other hand HeViCS ETG appear to have little star formation. Based on the trends found here, H-ATLAS ETG are thought to have more extended star formation histories and a younger stellar population than HeViCS ETG.
  • The Herschel survey, H-ATLAS, with its large areal coverage, has recently discovered a number of bright, strongly lensed high-z submillimeter galaxies. The strong magnification makes it possible to study molecular species other than CO, which are otherwise difficult to observe in high-z galaxies. Among the lensed galaxies already identified by H-ATLAS, the source J090302.9-014127B (SDP.17b) at z = 2.305 is remarkable due to its excitation conditions and a tentative detection of the H2O 202-111 emission line (Lupu et al. 2010). We report observations of this line in SDP.17b using the IRAM interferometer equipped with its new 277- 371GHz receivers. The H2O line is detected at a redshift of z = 2.3049+/-0.0006, with a flux of 7.8+/-0.5 Jy km s-1 and a FWHM of 250+/-60 km s-1. The new flux is 2.4 times weaker than the previous tentative detection, although both remain marginally consistent within 1.6-sigma. The intrinsic line luminosity and ratio of H2O(202-111)/CO8-7 seem comparable with those of the nearby starburst/enshrouded-AGN Mrk 231, suggesting that SDP.17b could also host a luminous AGN. The detection of a strong H2O 202-111 line in SDP.17b implies an efficient excitation mechanism of the water levels that must occur in very dense and warm interstellar gas.
  • We present Herschel SPIRE and PACS photometeric observations of the low metallicity (Z ~ 0.35 solar) nearby dwarf galaxy, NGC 1705, in six wavelength bands as part of the Dwarf Galaxy Survey guaranteed time Herschel Key Program. We confirm the presence of two dominant circumnuclear IR-bright regions surrounding the central super star cluster that had been previously noted at mid-IR wavelengths and in the sub-mm by LABOCA. On constructing a global spectral energy distribution using the SPIRE and PACS photometry, in conjunction with archival IR measurements, we note the presence of an excess at sub-mm wavelengths. This excess suggests the presence of a significant cold dust component within NGC 1705 and was modeled as an additional cold component in the SED. Although alternative explanations for the sub-mm excess beyond 350 microns, such as changes to the dust emissivity cannot be ruled out, the most likely explanation for the observed submillimetre excess is that of an additional cold dust component.
  • The standard method of mapping the interstellar medium in a galaxy, by observing the molecular gas in the CO 1-0 line and the atomic gas in the 21-cm line, is largely limited with current telescopes to galaxies in the nearby universe. In this letter, we use SPIRE observations of the galaxies M99 and M100 to explore the alternative approach of mapping the interstellar medium using the continuum emission from the dust. We have compared the methods by measuring the relationship between the star-formation rate and the surface density of gas in the galaxies. We find the two methods give relationships with a similar dispersion, confirming that observing the continuum emission from the dust is a promising method of mapping the interstellar medium in galaxies.
  • We present the first Herschel PACS and SPIRE images of the low-metallicity galaxy NGC6822 observed from 70 to 500 mu and clearly resolve the HII regions with PACS and SPIRE. We find that the ratio 250/500 is dependent on the 24 mu surface brightness in NGC6822, which would locally link the heating processes of the coldest phases of dust in the ISM to the star formation activity. We model the SEDs of some regions HII regions and less active regions across the galaxy and find that the SEDs of HII regions show warmer ranges of dust temperatures. We derive very high dust masses when graphite is used in our model to describe carbon dust. Using amorphous carbon, instead, requires less dust mass to account for submm emission due to its lower emissivity properties. This indicates that SED models including Herschel constraints may require different dust properties than commonly used.
  • We present the results of SCUBA observations of a complete sample of local ULIRGs. Twenty of the initial sample of 23 sources are detected at 850 um and nearly half of the objects are also detected at 450 um. This data is combined with existing observations of a further seven ULIRGs to produce the largest sample of submm observations of ULIRGs currently available. We use similar techniques to the SLUGS survey to fit dust spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to their far-IR emission. We find that ULIRGs have a higher dust temperature than lower luminosity objects (42K compared to 35K) and a steeper emissivity index. For those objects where 450 um fluxes are available we also attempt a two component dust SED fit, with warm and cool dust and a dust emissivity index of beta=2. Such a model has been found to be a good fit to lower luminosity systems. We find that it also works well for ULIRGs, but that ULIRGs have a smaller cold dust component. Comparison of the dust mass derived for ULIRGs and more normal spiral galaxies suggests that the dust content of a ULIRG is simply the combined dust content of the two galaxies whose merger has triggered the ULIRG activity. We examine the high end of the 850 um luminosity function and find results consistent with those of the earlier SLUGS survey. We also find that ULIRGs make up only about 50% of the high end of the 850 um luminosity function, with LIRGs containing a large mass of cool dust likely to be responsible for the rest.
  • Previous submillimetre (submm) observations detected 0.7 solar masses of cool dust emission around the Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) star Eta Carinae. These observations were hindered by the low declination of Eta Carinae and contamination from free-free emission orginating from the stellar wind. Here, we present deep submm observations with LABOCA at 870um, taken shortly after a maximum in the 5.5-yr radio cycle. We find a significant difference in the submm flux measured here compared with the previous measurement: the first indication of variability at submm wavelengths. A comparison of the submm structures with ionised emission features suggests the 870um is dominated by emission from the ionised wind and not thermal emission from dust. We estimate 0.4 +/- 0.1 solar masses of dust surrounding Eta Carinae. The spatial distribution of the submm emission limits the mass loss to within the last thousand years, and is associated with mass ejected during the great eruptions and the pre-outburst LBV wind phase; we estimate that Eta Carinae has ejected > 40 solar masses of gas within this timescale.
  • We present the first results from the largest deep extragalactic millimetre-wavelength survey undertaken to date. These results are derived from maps covering over 0.7 deg^2, made at 1.1mm, using the AzTEC continuum camera mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. The maps were made in the two fields originally targeted at 0.85mm with SCUBA in the SHADES project, namely the Lockman Hole East (mapped to a depth of 0.9-1.3 mJy rms) and the Subaru XMM Deep Field (1.0-1.7 mJy rms). The wealth of existing and forthcoming deep multi-frequency data in these two fields will allow the bright mm source population revealed by these images to be explored in detail in subsequent papers. Here we present the maps themselves, a catalogue of 114 high-significance sub-millimetre galaxy detections, and a thorough statistical analysis leading to the most robust determination to date of the 1.1mm source number counts. Through careful comparison, we find that both the COSMOS and GOODS North fields, also imaged with AzTEC, contain an excess of mm sources over the new 1.1mm source-count baseline established here. In particular, our new AzTEC/SHADES results indicate that very luminous high-redshift dust enshrouded starbursts (S_{1.1} > 3 mJy) are 25-50% less common than would have been inferred from these smaller surveys, thus highlighting the potential roles of cosmic variance and clustering in such measurements. We compare number count predictions from recent models of the evolving mm/sub-mm source population to these SMG surveys, which provide important constraints for the ongoing refinement of semi-analytic and hydrodynamical models of galaxy formation, and find that all recent models over-predict the number of bright sub-millimetre galaxies found in this survey.
  • If Type-II supernovae - the evolutionary end points of short-lived, massive stars - produce a significant quantity of dust (>0.1 M_sun) then they can explain the rest-frame far-infrared emission seen in galaxies and quasars in the first Gyr of the Universe. Submillimetre observations of the Galactic supernova remnant, Cas A, provided the first observational evidence for the formation of significant quantities of dust in Type-II supernovae. In this paper we present new data which show that the submm emission from Cas A is polarised at a level significantly higher than that of its synchrotron emission. The orientation is consistent with that of the magnetic field in Cas A, implying that the polarised submm emission is associated with the remnant. No known mechanism would vary the synchrotron polarisation in this way and so we attribute the excess polarised submm flux to cold dust within the remnant, providing fresh evidence that cosmic dust can form rapidly. This is supported by the presence of both polarised and unpolarised dust emission in the north of the remnant, where there is no contamination from foreground molecular clouds. The inferred dust polarisation fraction is unprecedented (f_pol ~ 30%) which, coupled with the brief timescale available for grain alignment (<300 yr), suggests that supernova dust differs from that seen in other Galactic sources (where f_pol=2-7%), or that a highly efficient grain alignment process must operate in the environment of a supernova remnant.
  • We present the optical-to-submm spectral energy distributions for 33 radio & mid-IR identified submillimetre galaxies discovered via the SHADES 850 micron SCUBA imaging in the Subaru-XMM Deep Field (SXDF). Optical data for the sources comes from the Subaru-XMM Deep Field (SXDF) and mid- and far-IR fluxes from SWIRE. We obtain photometric redshift estimates for our sources using optical and IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron fluxes. We then fit spectral energy distribution (SED) templates to the longer wavelength data to determine the nature of the far-IR emission that dominates the bolometric luminosity of these sources. The infrared template fits are also used to resolve ambiguous identifications and cases of redshift aliasing. The redshift distribution obtained broadly matches previous results for submm sources and on the SHADES SXDF field. Our template fitting finds that AGN, present in about 10% of sources, do not contribute significantly to their bolometric luminosity. Dust heating by starbursts, with either Arp220 or M82 type SEDs, appears to be responsible for the luminosity in most sources (23/33 are fitted by Arp220 templates, 2/33 by the warmer M82 templates). 8/33 sources, in contrast, are fit by a cooler cirrus dust template, suggesting that cold dust has a role in some of these highly luminous objects. Three of our sources appear to have multiple identifications or components at the same redshift, but we find no statistical evidence that close associations are common among our SHADES sources. Examination of rest-frame K -band luminosity suggests that 'downsizing' is underway in the submm galaxy population, with lower redshift systems lying in lower mass host galaxies. Of our 33 identifications six are found to be of lower reliability but their exclusion would not significantly alter our conclusions.
  • We present the maps, source catalogue and number counts of the largest, most complete and unbiased extragalactic submillimetre survey ever undertaken: the 850-micron SCUBA HAlf Degree Extragalactic Survey (SHADES). Using the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), SHADES mapped two separate regions of sky: the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Field (SXDF) and the Lockman Hole East (LH). These SCUBA maps cover 720 square arcmin with an RMS noise level of about 2 mJy and have uncovered >100 submillimetre galaxies. In order to ensure the utmost robustness of the resulting source catalogue, data reduction was independently carried out by four sub-groups drawn within the SHADES team, providing an unprecedented degree of reliability with respect to other SCUBA catalogues available from the literature. Individual source lists from the four groups were combined to produce a robust 120-object SHADES catalogue; an invaluable resource for follow-up campaigns aiming to study the properties of a complete and consistent sample of submillimetre galaxies. We present differential and integral source number counts of submillimetre galaxies and find that the differential counts are better fit with a broken power-law or a Schechter function than with a single power-law; the SHADES data alone significantly show that a break is required at several mJy, although the precise position of the break is not well constrained. We also find that an 850-micron survey complete down to 2 mJy would resolve 20-30 per cent of the Far-IR background into point sources. [abridged]
  • We present the complete submillimeter data for the Canada-UK Deep Submillimeter Survey (CUDSS) 3-hour field. The obeservations were taken with the Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea. The 3-hour field is one of two main fields in our survey and covers 60 square arcminutes to a 3-sigma depth of 3 mJy. In this field we have detected 27 sources above 3-sigma and 15 above 3.5-sigma. We assume the source counts follow the form $N(S) {\propto} S^{-\alpha}$ and measure $\alpha$ = 3.3$^{+1.4}_{-1.0}$. This is in good agreement with previous studies and further supports our claim (Eales et al., 2000) that SCUBA sources brighter than 3 mJy produce ~20% of the 850$\mu$m background energy. Using preliminary ISO 15 $\mu$m maps and VLA 1.4 GHz data we have identified counterparts for six objects and have marginal detections at 450$\mu$m for two additional sources. With this information we estimate a median redshift for the sample of 2.0$\pm$0.5, with $\sim$10% lying at $z<$ 1. We have measured the angular clustering of S850 > 3 mJy sources using the source catalogues from the CUDSS two main fields, the 3-hour and 14-hour fields, and find a marginal detection of clustering, primarily from the 14-hour field, of $\omega(\theta)=4.4\pm2.9 \theta^{-0.8}$. This is consistent with clustering at least as strong as that seen for the Lyman-break galaxy population and the Extremely Red Objects. Since SCUBA sources are selected over a broader range in redshifts than these two populations the strength of the true spatial clustering is expected to be correspondingly stronger.
  • We present a high-resolution millimetre interferometric image of the brightest SCUBA-selected galaxy from the Canada-UK deep SCUBA survey (CUDSS). We make a very clear detection at 1.3 mm, but fail to resolve any structure in the source. The interferometric position is within 1.5 arcsec of the SCUBA 850 $\mu$m centroid, and also within 1.5 arcsec of a 44 $\mu$Jy radio source and a very faint, extremely red galaxy which we had previously identified as the submillimetre source. We also present new optical and infrared imaging, and infrared spectroscopy of this source. We model the overall spectral energy distribution and conclude that it lies within the redshift range 2$< z < 4.5$. The submm/FIR luminosity of CUDSS14A is very weakly dependent on redshift within the constrained range, and is roughly 4$\times10^{12}$ L$_\odot$ (for H$_0$=75 and an assumed Arp220-like spectrum), which implies a star-formation rate $\sim$1000 M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. We derive an approximate gas mass of $\sim 10^{10}$ M$_\odot$ which would imply the current star-forming activity cannot be sustained for longer than about 10 million years. With the present data however we are unable to rule out a significant AGN contribution to the total luminosity.
  • We present the results of colour selection of candidate high redshift galaxies in Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) using the Lyman dropout scheme. The HDF-S data we discuss were taken in a number of different filters extending from the near--UV (F300W) to the infrared (F222M) in two different fields. This allows us to select candidates with redshifts from z~3 to z~12. We find 15 candidate z~3 objects (F300W dropouts), 1 candidate z~4 object (F450W dropout) and 16 candidate z$\sim$5 objects (F606W dropouts) in the ~ 4.7 arcmin^2 WFPC-2 field, 4 candidate z~6 (optical dropouts) and 1 candidate z~8 (F110W dropout) in the 0.84 arcmin^2 NICMOS-3 field. No F160W dropouts are found (z~12). We compare our selection technique with existing data for HDF-North and discuss alternative interpretations of the objects. We conclude that there are a number of lower redshift interlopers in the selections, including one previously identified object (Treu et al. 1998), and reject those objects most likely to be foreground contaminants. Even after this we conclude that the F606W dropout list is likely to still contain substantial foreground contamination. The lack of candidate very high redshift UV-luminous galaxies supports earlier conclusions by Lanzetta et al. (1998). We discuss the morphologies and luminosity functions of the high redshift objects, and their cosmological implications.