• In the long-term multi-frequency monitoring program of the microquasars with RATAN-600 we discovered the giant flare from the X-ray binary Cygnus X-3 on 13 September 2016. It happened after 2000 days of the 'quiescent state' of the source passed after the former giant flare (~18 Jy) in March 2011. We have found that during this quiet period the hard X-ray flux (Swift/BAT, 15-50 keV) and radio flux (RATAN-600, 11 GHz) have been strongly anti-correlated. Both radio flares occurred after transitions of the microquasar to a 'hypersoft' X-ray state that occurred in February 2011 and in the end of August 2016. The giant flare was predicted by us in the first ATel #9416. Indeed after dramatic decrease of the hard X-ray Swift 15-50 keV flux and RATAN 4-11 GHz fluxes (a 'quenched state') a small flare (0.7 Jy at 4-11 GHz) developed on MJD 57632 and then on MJD 57644.5 almost simultaneously with X-rays radio flux rose from 0.01 to 15 Jy at 4.6 GHz during few days. The rise of the flaring flux is well fitted by a exponential law that could be a initial phase of the relativistic electrons generation by internal shock waves in the jets. Initially spectra were optically thick at frequencies lower 2 GHz and optically thin at frequencies higher 8 GHz with typical spectral index about -0.5. After maximum of the flare radio fluxes at all frequencies faded out with the exponential law (~ exp(-(t-t0)/2d) for 21.7 GHz).
  • We report about the multi-frequency (1-30 GHz) daily monitoring of the radio flux variability of the three microquasars: SS433, GRS1915+105 and Cyg X-3 during the period from September 2005 to May 2006. 1. We detected clear correlation of the flaring radio fluxes and X-rays 'spikes' at 2-12 keV emission detected in RXTE ASM from GRS1915+105 during eight relatively bright (200-600 mJy) radio flares in October 2005. The 1-22 GHz spectra of these flares in maximum were optically thick at frequencies lower 2.3 GHz and optically thin at the higher frequencies. During the radio flares the spectra of the X-ray spikes become softer than those of the quiescent phase. Thus these data indicated the transitions from very high/hard states to high/soft ones during which massive ejections are probably happened. These ejections are visible as the detected radio flares. 2. After of the quiescent radio emission we have detected a drop down of the fluxes (~20 mJy) from Cyg X-3. That is a sign of the following bright flare. Indeed such a 1Jy-flare was detected on 3 February 2006 after 18 days of the quenched radio emission. The daily spectra of the flare in the maximum was flat from 1 to 100 GHz, using the quasi-simultaneous observations at 109 GHz with RT45m telescope and millimeter array (NMA) of Nobeyama Radio Observatory in Japan. The several bright radio flaring events (1-10 Jy) followed during this state of very variable and intensive 1-12 keV X-ray emission (~0.5 Crab), which being monitored in RXTE ASM program.
  • Aims. Understand the shape and implications of the multiband light curve of GRB 050408, an X-ray rich (XRR) burst. Methods. We present a multiband optical light curve, covering the time from the onset of the gamma-ray event to several months after, when we only detect the host galaxy. Together with X-ray, millimetre and radio observations we compile what, to our knowledge, is the most complete multiband coverage of an XRR burst afterglow to date. Results. The optical and X-ray light curve is characterised by an early flattening and an intense bump peaking around 6 days after the burst onset. We explain the former by an off-axis viewed jet, in agreement with the predictions made for XRR by some models, and the latter with an energy injection equivalent in intensity to the initial shock. The analysis of the spectral flux distribution reveals an extinction compatible with a low chemical enrichment surrounding the burst. Together with the detection of an underlying starburst host galaxy we can strengthen the link between XRR and classical long-duration bursts.
  • The principal results of daily observations with the RATAN-600 radio telescope of X-ray binary with relativistic jets microquasar SS433 in 1986--2003 are presented. We have measured the flux densities at 0.96, 2.3, 3.9, 7.7, 11.2 and 21.7 GHz in different sets, duration from a week to some months. In general there are 940 observations of SS433 and more than 4500 flux density measurements in the period. Observations show that radio spectra are well fitting by a power law. The mean spectral index remained the same, $-0.60\pm0.14$ during almost 20 years at least, and mean accuracy of the index determination was better than 0.1 in our multi-frequency observations, i.e. it was higher than in the intensive two-frequency monitoring of SS433 with the three-element GBI interferometer. Flux density data and spectra `on-line' plotting are accessible on the CATS data base site: http://cats.sao.ru/.
  • We present the results from a multiwavelength campaign of GRS 1915+105 performed from 2000 April 16 to 25. This is one of the largest coordinated set of observations ever performed for this source, covering the wide energy band in radio (13.3-0.3 cm), near-infrared (J-H-K), X-rays and Gamma-rays (from 1 keV to 10 MeV). During the campaign GRS 1915+105 was predominantly in the "plateau" (or low/hard) state but sometimes showed soft X-ray oscillations: before April 20.3, rapid, quasi-periodic (~= 45 min) flare-dip cycles were observed. The radio flares observed on April 17 shows frequency- dependent peak delay, consistent with an expansion of synchrotron-emitting region starting at the transition from the hard-dip to the soft-flare states in X-rays. On the other hand, infrared flares on April 20 appear to follow (or precede) the beginning of X-ray oscillations with an inconstant time delay of ~= 5-30 min. This implies that the infrared emitting region is located far from the black hole by >~ 10E13 cm, while its size is <~ 10E12 cm constrained from the time variability. We find a good correlation between the quasi-steady flux level in the near-infrared band and in the X-ray band. From this we estimate that the reprocessing of X-rays, probably occurring in the outer parts of the accretion disk, accounts for about 20-30% of the observed K magnitude in the plateau state. The OSSE spectrum in the 0.05-10 MeV band is represented by a single power law with a photon index of 3.1 extending to ~1 MeV with no cutoff. The power-law slope above ~30 keV is found to be very similar between different states in spite of large flux variations in soft X-rays, implying that the electron energy distribution is not affected by the change of the state in the accretion disk.
  • We report high sensitivity dual-frequency observations of radio oscillations from GRS 1915+105 following the decay of a major flare event in 2000 July. The oscillations are clearly observed at both frequencies, and the time-resolved spectral index traces the events between optically thin and thick states. While previously anticipated from sparse observations and simple theory, this is the first time a quasi-periodic signal has been seen in the radio spectrum, and is a clear demonstration that flat radio spectra can arise from the combination of emission from optically thick and thin regions. In addition, we measure the linear polarisation of the oscillations, at both frequencies, at a level of about 1--2%, with a flat spectrum. Cross-correlating the two light curves we find a mean delay, in the sense that the emission at 8640 MHz leads that at 4800 MHz, of around 600 seconds. Comparison with frequency-dependent time delays reported in the literature reveals that this delay is variable between epochs. We briefly discuss possible origins for a varying time delay, and suggest possible consequences.
  • We present results of long-term daily monitoring of a sample of Galactic radio-emitting X-ray binaries showing relativistic jets (RJXRB): SS433, Cyg X-3, and GRS 1915+105, with the RATAN-600 radio telescope in the 0.6-22 GHz range. We carried out the modeling calculations to understand the temporal (1--100 days) and spectral (1-22 GHz) dependence. We tested the finite jet segment models and we found that the geometry of the conical hollow jets is responsible for either a power law or an exponential decay of the flares. SS433 was monitored for 100 days in 1997 and 120 days in 1999. From the quiescent radio light curves, we obtained clear evidence of a 6.04-day 10-15% modulation. Three powerful flares (up to 13 Jy) from Cyg X-3 were detected in April 2000.
  • Variable non-thermal radio emission from Galactic X-ray binaries is a trace of relativistic jets, created near accretion disks. The spectral characteristics of a lot of radio flares in the X-ray binaries with jets (RJXB) is discussed in this report. We carried out several long daily monitoring programs with the RATAN-600 radio telescope of the sources: SS433, Cyg X-3, LSI+61o303, GRS 1915+10 and some others. We also reviewed some data from the GBI monitoring program at two frequencies and hard X-ray BATSE (20-100 keV) and soft X-ray RTXE (2-12 keV) ASM data. We confirmed that flaring radio emission of Cyg X-3 correlated with hard and anti-correlated with soft X-ray emission during the strong flare (>$ Jy) in May 1997. During two orbital periods we investigated radio light curves of the remarkable X-binary LSI+61o303. Two flaring events near a phase 0.6 of the 26.5-day orbital period have been detected for first time at four frequencies simultaneously. Powerful flaring events of SS433 were detected at six frequencies in May 1996 and in May 1999. The decay of the flare is exactly fitted by an exponential law and the rate of the decay $\tau$ depends upon frequency as tau \propto \nu^{-0.4} in the first flare and does not depend upon frequency in the second flare, and is equal to \tau=6+-1 days at frequencies from 0.96 to 21.7 GHz in the last flare in May 1999. Many flaring RJXB show two, exponential and power, laws of flare decay. Moreover, these different laws could be present in one or several flares and commonly flare decays are faster at a higher frequency. The decay law seems to change because of geometric form of the conical hollow jets. The synchrotron and inverse Compton losses could explain general frequency dependences in flare evolution. In conclusion we summarized the general radio properties of RJXB.
  • The extended radio source G16.2-2.7 is detected as a new previously uncataloged Galactic supernova remnant. Its non-thermal radio spectrum has spectral index alpha=-0.51, with S_nu(1 GHz) = 2.08 Jy, as being measured with the RATAN-600 radio telescope. The NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) map at 1.4 GHz shows a shell-like bilateral structure. The similar smoothed image from the Effelsberg survey at 2.7 GHz is discussed. The angular diameter 17' of a circular shell is fitted to brightness peaks meanwhile the outer diameter D_max = 18.4' and the width Delta_R=1' are fitted with the model of a spherical optically thin hollow shell. The surface brightness of G16.2-2.7: Sigma(1GHz)= (1+-0.1)10^{-21} W Hz^{-1}m^{-2}sr^{-1}. The peaks in the shell arcs are highly polarized at 1.4 GHz.
  • We have collected the largest existing set of radio source lists in machine-readable form: 320 tables with 1.75 million records. Only a minor fraction of these is accessible via public databases. We describe our plans to make this huge amount of heterogeneous data accessible in a homogeneous way via the World Wide Web, with reliable cross-identifications, and searchable by various observables.