• TIFR Near Infrared Imaging Camera-II is a closed-cycle Helium cryo-cooled imaging camera equipped with a Raytheon 512 x 512 pixels InSb Aladdin III Quadrant focal plane array having sensitivity to photons in the 1-5 microns wavelength band. In this paper, we present the performance of the camera on the newly installed 3.6-m Devasthal Optical Telescope (DOT) based on the calibration observations carried out during 2017 May 11-14 and 2017 October 7-31. After the preliminary characterization, the camera has been released to the Indian and Belgian astronomical community for science observations since 2017 May. The camera offers a field-of-view of ~86.5 arcsec x 86.5 arcsec on the DOT with a pixel scale of 0.169 arcsec. The seeing at the telescope site in the near-infrared bands is typically sub-arcsecond with the best seeing of ~0.45 arcsec realized in the near-infrared K-band on 2017 October 16. The camera is found to be capable of deep observations in the J, H and K bands comparable to other 4-m class telescopes available world-wide. Another highlight of this camera is the observational capability for sources up to Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) W1-band (3.4 microns) magnitudes of 9.2 in the narrow L-band (nbL; lambda_{cen} ~3.59 microns). Hence, the camera could be a good complementary instrument to observe the bright nbL-band sources that are saturated in the Spitzer-Infrared Array Camera ([3.6] <= 7.92 mag) and the WISE W1-band ([3.4] <= 8.1 mag). Sources with strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission at 3.3 microns are also detected. Details of the observations and estimated parameters are presented in this paper.
  • We use high--quality, multi-band observations of Swift GRB120404A, from gamma-ray to radio frequencies, together with the new hydrodynamics code of van Eerten et al. (2012) to test the standard synchrotron shock model. The evolution of the radio and optical afterglow, with its prominent optical rebrightening at t_rest 260-2600 s, is remarkably well modelled by a decelerating jet viewed close to the jet edge, combined with some early re-energization of the shock. We thus constrain the geometry of the jet with half-opening and viewing angles of 23 and 21 deg respectively and suggest that wide jets viewed off-axis are more common in GRBs than previously thought. We also derive the fireball microphysics parameters epsilon_B=2.4e-4 and epsilon_e=9.3e-2 and a circumburst density of n=240 cm^-3. The ability to self-consistently model the microphysics parameters and jet geometry in this way offers an alternative to trying to identify elusive canonical jet breaks at late times. The mismatch between the observed and model-predicted X-ray fluxes is explained by the local rather than the global cooling approximation in the synchrotron radiation model, constraining the microphysics of particle acceleration taking place in a relativistic shock and, in turn, emphasising the need for a more realistic treatment of cooling in future developments of theoretical models. Finally, our interpretation of the optical peak as due to the passage of the forward shock synchrotron frequency highlights the importance of high quality multi-band data to prevent some optical peaks from being erroneously attributed to the onset of fireball deceleration.
  • Soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) are a rare type of gamma-ray transient sources that are ocasionally detected as bursts in the high-energy sky. They are thought to be produced by magnetars, young neutron stars with very strong magnetic fields of the order of 10^(14-15) G. Only three such objects are known in our Galaxy, and a fourth one is associated with the supernova remnant N49 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. In none of these cases has an optical counterpart to either the gamma-ray flares or the quiescent source been identified. Here we present multi-wavelength observations of a puzzling source, SWIFT J195509+261406, for which we detected more than 40 flaring episodes in the optical band over a time span of 3 days, plus a faint infrared flare 11 days later, after which it returned to quiescence. We propose that SWIFT J195509+261406 is a member of a subgroup of SGRs for which the long-term X-ray emission is transient in nature. Furthermore, it is the first SGR for which bursts have been detected in the optical and near-infrared bands and maybe the link between the "persistent" SGRs and the dim isolated neutron stars.
  • We present and discuss the results of an extensive observational campaign devoted to GRB071010A, a long-duration gamma-ray burst detected by the Swift satellite. This event was followed for almost a month in the optical/near-infrared (NIR) with various telescopes starting from about 2min after the high-energy event. Swift-XRT observations started only later at about 0.4d. The light-curve evolution allows us to single out an initial rising phase with a maximum at about 7min, possibly the afterglow onset in the context of the standard fireball model, which is then followed by a smooth decay interrupted by a sharp rebrightening at about 0.6d. The rebrightening was visible in both the optical/NIR and X-rays and can be interpreted as an episode of discrete energy injection, although various alternatives are possible. A steepening of the afterglow light curve is recorded at about 1d. The entire evolution of the optical/NIR afterglow is consistent with being achromatic. This could be one of the few identified GRB afterglows with an achromatic break in the X-ray through the optical/NIR bands. Polarimetry was also obtained at about 1d, just after the rebrightening and almost coincident with the steepening. This provided a fairly tight upper limit of 0.9% for the polarized-flux fraction.
  • GRB 060614 is a remarkable GRB observed by Swift with puzzling properties, which challenge current progenitor models. The lack of any bright SN down to very strict limits and the vanishing spectral lags are typical of short GRBs, strikingly at odds with the long (102s) duration of this event. Here we present spectral and temporal analysis of the Swift observations. We show that the burst presents standard optical, UV and X-ray afterglows. An achromatic break is observed simultaneously in optical and X-rays, at a time consistent with the break in the R-band light curve measured by the VLT. The achromatic behaviour and the consistent post-break decay slopes make GRB 060614 one of the best examples of a jet break for a Swift burst. The optical, UV and X-rays afterglow light curves have also an earlier break at ~30 ks. In the optical, there is strong spectral evolution around this break, suggesting the passage of a break frequency through the optical/UV band. The very blue spectrum at early times and the trend in the light curves (rising at low frequencies, and decaying at higher energies) suggest this may be the injection frequency. The early X-ray light curve is well interpreted as the X-ray counterpart of the burst extended emission. Spectral analysis of BAT/XRT data in the 80s overlap time show that the Ep of the burst has decreased to as low as 8keV at the beginning of the XRT observation. The Ep continues to decrease through the XRT energy band and exits it at about 500s after the trigger. The average Ep of the burst is likely < 24 keV but larger than 8 keV. The initial peak observed by BAT is however distinctly harder than the rest with Ep ~300 keV as measured by Konus Wind. Considering the time-averaged spectral properties, GRB 060614 is consistent with the Eiso-Ep_rest, Egamma-Ep_rest, and Liso-Ep correlations.
  • Aims. Understand the shape and implications of the multiband light curve of GRB 050408, an X-ray rich (XRR) burst. Methods. We present a multiband optical light curve, covering the time from the onset of the gamma-ray event to several months after, when we only detect the host galaxy. Together with X-ray, millimetre and radio observations we compile what, to our knowledge, is the most complete multiband coverage of an XRR burst afterglow to date. Results. The optical and X-ray light curve is characterised by an early flattening and an intense bump peaking around 6 days after the burst onset. We explain the former by an off-axis viewed jet, in agreement with the predictions made for XRR by some models, and the latter with an energy injection equivalent in intensity to the initial shock. The analysis of the spectral flux distribution reveals an extinction compatible with a low chemical enrichment surrounding the burst. Together with the detection of an underlying starburst host galaxy we can strengthen the link between XRR and classical long-duration bursts.
  • We present multiwavelength observations of the gamma-ray burst GRB 051028 detected by HETE-2 in order to derive its afterglow emission parameters and to determine the reason for its optical faintness when compared to other events. Observations were taken in the optical (2.0m Himalayan Chandra Telescope, 1.34m Tautenburg, 4.2m William Herschel Telescope) and in X-rays (Swift/XRT) between 2.7 hours and 10 days after the onset of the event. The data can be interpreted by collimated emission in a jet with a typical value of $p$ = 2.4 which is moving in an homogeneous interstellar medium and with a cooling frequency nu_{c} still above the X-rays at 0.5 days after the burst onset. GRB 051028 can be classified as a ``gray'' or ``potentially dark'' GRB. On the basis of the combined optical and Swift/XRT data, we conclude that the reason for the optical dimness is not extra absorption in the host galaxy, but rather the GRB taking place at high-redshift.We also notice the very striking similarity with the optical lightcurve of GRB 050730, a burst with a spectroscopic redshift of 3.967, although GRB 051028 is about 3 mag fainter. We suggest that the bump could be explained by multiple energy injection episodes and that the burst is intrinsically faint when compared to the average afterglows detected since 1997. The non-detection of the host galaxy down to R = 25.1 is also consistent with the burst arising at high redshift, compatible with the published pseudo-z of 3.7 +/- 1.8.
  • Since the discovery of the first short-hard gamma-ray burst afterglows in 2005, the handful of observed events have been found to be embedded in nearby (z < 1), bright underlying galaxies. We present multiwavelength observations of the short-duration burst GRB 060121, which is the first observed to clearly outshine its host galaxy (by a factor >10^2). A photometric redshift for this event places the progenitor at a most probable redshift of z = 4.6, with a less probable scenario of z = 1.7. In either case, GRB 060121 could be the farthermost short-duration GRB detected to date and implies an isotropic-equivalent energy release in gamma-rays comparable to that seen in long-duration bursts. We discuss the implications of the released energy on the nature of the progenitor. These results suggest that GRB 060121 may belong to a family of energetic short-duration events, lying at z > 1 and whose optical afterglows would outshine their host galaxies, unlike the first short-duration GRBs observed in 2005. The possibility of GRB 060121 being an intermediate duration burst is also discussed.
  • We report on the photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric, monitoring of the optical afterglow of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) 030328 detected by HETE-2. Photometry, collected at 7 different telescopes, shows that a smoothly broken powerlaw decay, with indices alpha_1 = 0.76 +/- 0.03, alpha_2 = 1.50 +/- 0.07 and a break at t_b = 0.48 +/- 0.03 days after the GRB, provides the best fit of the optical afterglow decline. This shape is interpreted as due to collimated emission, for which we determine a jet opening angle theta_{jet} of about 3.2 degrees. An achromatic bump starting around 0.2 d after the GRB is possibly marginally detected in the optical light curves. Optical spectroscopy shows the presence of two rest-frame ultraviolet metal absorption systems at z = 1.5216 +/- 0.0006 and at z = 1.295 +/- 0.001, the former likely associated with the GRB host galaxy. Analysis of the absorption lines at z = 1.5216 suggests that the host of this GRB may be a Damped Lyman-alpha Absorber. The optical V-band afterglow appears polarized, with P= (2.4 +/- 0.6) % and theta = (170 +/- 7) degrees, suggesting an asymmetric blastwave expansion. An X-ray-to-optical spectral flux distribution of the GRB 030328 afterglow was obtained at 0.78 days after the GRB and fitted using a broken powerlaw, with an optical spectral slope beta_{opt} = 0.47 +/- 0.15, and an X-ray slope beta_{X} = 1.0 +/- 0.2. The discussion of these results in the context of the "fireball model" shows that the preferred scenario for this afterglow is collimated structured jet with fixed opening angle in a homogeneous medium.
  • We here report on the photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric monitoring of the optical afterglow of the Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) 030328 detected by HETE-2. We found that a smoothly broken power-law decay provides the best fit of the optical light curves, with indices alpha_1 = 0.76 +/- 0.03, alpha_2 = 1.50 +/- 0.07, and a break at t_b = 0.48 +/- 0.03 d after the GRB. Polarization is detected in the optical V-band, with P = (2.4 +/- 0.6)% and theta = (170 +/- 7) deg. Optical spectroscopy shows the presence of two absorption systems at z = 1.5216 +/- 0.0006 and at z = 1.295 +/- 0.001, the former likely associated with the GRB host galaxy. The X-ray-to-optical spectral flux distribution obtained 0.78 days after the GRB was best fitted using a broken power-law, with spectral slopes beta_opt = 0.47 +/- 0.15 and beta_X = 1.0 +/- 0.2. The discussion of these results in the context of the "fireball model" shows that the preferred scenario is a fixed opening angle collimated expansion in a homogeneous medium.
  • We present radio, millimeter and optical observations of the afterglow of GRB030329. UBVR_{C}I_{C} photometry is presented for a period of 3 hours to 34 days after the burst. Radio monitoring at 1280 MHz has been carried out using the GMRT for more than a year. Simultaneous millimeter observations at 90 GHz and 230 GHz have been obtained from the Swedish-ESO Submillimeter Telescope (SEST) and the IRAM-PdB interferometer over more than a month following the burst. We use these data to constrain the double jet model proposed by Berger et al. (2003) for this afterglow. We also examine whether instead of the two jets being simultaneously present, the wider jet could result from the initially narrow jet, due to a fresh supply of energy from the central engine after the ``jet break''.
  • The CCD magnitudes in Johnson $UBV$ and Cousins $RI$ photometric passbands for the afterglow of the long duration GRB 030226 are presented. Upper limits of a few mJy to millimeter wave emission at the location of optical are obtained over the first two weeks. The optical data presented here, in combination with other published data on this afterglow, show an early $R$ band flux decay slope of 0.77$\pm$0.04, steepening to 2.05$\pm$0.04 about 0.65$\pm$0.03 day after the burst. Interpreted as the ``jet break'', this indicates a half opening angle of $\sim 3.2$ degree for the initial ejection, for an assumed ambient density of $\sim 1 {\rm cm}^{-3}$. Broadband spectra show no appreciable evolution during the observations, and indicate the presence of synchrotron cooling frequency $\nu_c$ near the upper edge of the optical band. From the broadband spectra we derive an electron energy distribution index $p = 2.07\pm0.06$ and an intrinsic extinction $E(B - V)\sim0.17$. Millimeter upper limits are consistent with these derived parameters.
  • The CCD magnitudes in Johnson $B,V$ and Cousins $R$ and $I$ photometric passbands are determined for the bright long duration GRB 021004 afterglow from 2002 October 4 to 16 starting $\sim$ 3 hours after the $\gamma-$ray burst. Light curves of the afterglow emission in $B$,$V$,$R$ and $I$ passbands are obtained by combining these measurements with other published data. The earliest optical emission appears to originate in a revese shock. Flux decay of the afterglow shows a very uncommon variation relative to other well-observed GRBs. Rapid light variations, especially during early times ($\Delta t < 2$ days) is superposed on an underlying broken power law decay typical of a jetted afterglow. The flux decay constants at early and late times derived from least square fits to the light curve are $0.99\pm0.05$ and $2.0\pm0.2$ respectively, with a jet break at around 7 day. Comparison with a standard fireball model indicates a total extinction of $E(B-V)=0.20$ mag in the direction of the burst. Our low-resolution spectra corrected for this extinction provide a spectral slope $\beta = 0.6\pm0.02$. This value and the flux decay constants agree well with the electron energy index $p\sim 2.27$ used in the model. The derived jet opening angle of about $7^{\circ}$ implies a total emitted gamma-ray energy $E_{\gamma} = 3.5\times10^{50}$ erg at a cosmological distance of about 20 Gpc. Multiwavelength observations indicate association of this GRB with a star forming region, supporting the case for collapsar origin of long duration GRBs.
  • We determine Johnson $B,V$ and Cousins $R,I$ photometric CCD magnitudes for the afterglow of GRB 021211 during the first night after the GRB trigger. The afterglow was very faint and would have been probably missed if no prompt observation had been conducted. A fraction of the so-called ``dark'' GRBs may thus be just ``optically dim'' and require very deep imaging to be detected. The early-time optical light curve reported by other observers shows prompt emission with properties similar to that of GRB 990123. Following this, the afterglow emission from $\sim 11$ min to $\sim 33$ days after the burst is characterized by an overall power-law decay with a slope $1.1\pm0.02$ in the $R$ passband. We derive the value of spectral index in the optical to near-IR region to be 0.6$\pm$0.2 during 0.13 to 0.8 day after the burst. The flux decay constant and the spectral slope indicate that optical observations within a day after the burst lies between cooling frequency and synchrotron maximum frequency.
  • We present multiwavelength observations of a gamma-ray burst detected by INTEGRAL (GRB 030227) between 5.3 hours and ~1.7 days after the event. Here we report the discovery of a dim optical afterglow (OA) that would not have been detected by many previous searches due to its faintess (R~23). This OA was seen to decline following a power law decay with index Alpha_R= -0.95 +/- 0.16. The spectral index Beta_opt/NIR yielded -1.25 +/- 0.14. These values may be explained by a relativistic expansion of a fireball (with p = 2.0) in the cooling regime. We also find evidence for inverse Compton scattering in X-rays.
  • (Abridged) We report on observations of the optical and NIR afterglow of GRB020405. Ground-based optical observations started about 1 day after the GRB and spanned a period of ~10 days; archival HST data extended the coverage up to 70 days after the GRB. We report the first detection of the afterglow in NIR bands. The detection of emission lines in the optical spectrum indicates that the GRB is located at z = 0.691. Absorptions are also detected at z = 0.691 and at z = 0.472. The latter system is likely caused by clouds in a galaxy located 2 arcsec southwest of the GRB host. Hence, for the first time, the galaxy responsible for an intervening absorption system in the spectrum of a GRB afterglow is identified. Optical and NIR photometry indicates that the decay in all bands follows a single power law of index alpha = 1.54. The late-epoch VLT and HST points lie above the extrapolation of this power law, so that a plateau is apparent in the VRIJ light curves at 10-20 days after the GRB. The light curves at epochs later than day ~20 after the GRB are consistent with a power-law decay with index alphaprime = 1.85. We suggest that this deviation can be modeled with a SN having the same temporal profile as SN2002ap, but 1.3 mag brighter at peak, and located at the GRB redshift. Alternatively, a shock re-energization may be responsible for the rebrightening. A polarimetric R-band measurement shows that the afterglow is polarized, with P = 1.5 % and theta = 172 degrees. Optical-NIR spectral flux distributions show a change of slope across the J band which we interpret as due to the presence of nu_c. The analysis of the multiwavelength spectrum within the fireball model suggests that a population of relativistic electrons produces the optical-NIR emission via synchrotron in an adiabatically expanding blastwave, and the X-rays via IC.
  • We report photometric observations of the optical afterglow of GRB010222 in V,R and I passbands carried out at UPSO, Naini Tal between 22-27 Feb 2001. We determine CCD Johnson BV and Cousins RI photometric magnitudes for 31 stars in the field of GRB010222 and use them to calibrate our measurements as well as other published BVRI photometric magnitudes of GRB010222 afterglow. We construct the light curve in V,R,I passbands and from a broken power-law fit determine the decay indices of 0.74+/-0.05 and 1.35+/-0.04 before and after the break at 0.7 days. Using reported X-ray flux measurements at 0.35 and 9.13 days after the burst we determine X-ray to opt/IR spectral index of 0.61+/-0.02 and 0.75+/-0.02 on these two days. We also report upper limits to the radio flux obtained from the RATAN-600 telescope and the GMRT, and millimeter-wave upper limits obtained from the Plateau de Bure Millimeter interferometer. We argue that the synchrotron cooling frequency is below the optical band for most of the observing period. We also estimate an initial jet opening angle of about 2.0n^(1/8) degrees, where n is the number density of the ambient medium.
  • Observations of the extraordinarily bright optical afterglow (OA) of GRB 991208 started 2.1 d after the event. The flux decay constant of the OA in the R-band is -2.30 +/- 0.07 up to 5 d, which is very likely due to the jet effect, and after that it is followed by a much steeper decay with constant -3.2 +/- 0.2, the fastest one ever seen in a GRB OA. A negative detection in several all-sky films taken simultaneously to the event implies either a previous additional break prior to 2 d after the occurrence of the GRB (as expected from the jet effect). The existence of a second break might indicate a steepening in the electron spectrum or the superposition of two events. Once the afterglow emission vanished, contribution of a bright underlying SN is found, but the light curve is not sufficiently well sampled to rule out a dust echo explanation. Our determination of z = 0.706 indicates that GRB 991208 is at 3.7 Gpc, implying an isotropic energy release of 1.15 x 10E53 erg which may be relaxed by beaming by a factor > 100. Precise astrometry indicates that the GRB coincides within 0.2" with the host galaxy, thus given support to a massive star origin. The absolute magnitude is M_B = -18.2, well below the knee of the galaxy luminosity function and we derive a star-forming rate of 11.5 +/- 7.1 Mo/yr. The quasi-simultaneous broad-band photometric spectral energy distribution of the afterglow is determined 3.5 day after the burst (Dec 12.0) implying a cooling frequency below the optical band, i.e. supporting a jet model with p = -2.30 as the index of the power-law electron distribution.
  • CCD Johnsons BV and Cousins RI photometric magnitudes are determined for 20 stars in the field of GRB 000926. Using them as calibrators, B and R band light curves are constructed of the afterglow from ours and other published observations. They show a steepening of the flux decay, from a decay constant of 1.4+/-0.1 to 2.6+/-0.06 at about 1.7 days after the burst. Attributing this break to the onset of sideways expansion of a jet-like ejecta, we estimate an initial jet opening angle of ~0.14 radian, and a burst energy of ~10^51 erg. We construct the X-ray-optical-near infrared spectrum of the afterglow and derive a spectral index of ~ -0.9. From the spectrum we also estimate that the source has a rather large intrinsic extinction, amounting to E(B-V)=0.36+/-0.02.