• Superconducting spintronics has emerged in the last decade as a promising new field that seeks to open a new dimension for nanoelectronics by utilizing the internal spin structure of the superconducting Cooper pair as a new degree of freedom. Its basic building blocks are spin-triplet Cooper pairs with equally aligned spins, which are promoted by proximity of a conventional superconductor to a ferromagnetic material with inhomogeneous macroscopic magnetization. Using low-energy muon spin rotation experiments, we find an entirely unexpected novel effect: the appearance of a magnetization in a thin layer of a non-magnetic metal (gold), separated from a ferromagnetic double layer by a 50 nm thick superconducting layer of Nb. The effect can be controlled by either temperature or by using a magnetic field to control the state of the remote ferromagnetic elements and may act as a basic building block for a new generation of quantum interference devices based on the spin of a Cooper pair.
  • Transport measurements are presented on thin-film superconducting spin-valve systems, where the controlled non-collinear arrangement of two ferromagnetic Co layers can be used to influence the superconducting state of Nb. We observe a very clear oscillation of the superconducting transition temperature with the relative orientation of the two ferromagnetic layers. Our measurements allow us to distinguish between the competing influences of domain averaging, stray dipolar fields and the formation of superconducting spin triplets. Domain averaging is shown to lead to a weak enhancement of transition temperature for the anti-parallel configuration of exchange fields, while much larger changes are observed for other configurations, which can be attributed to drainage currents due to spin triplet formation.
  • Muon-spin rotation has been used to probe vortex state in Sr$_2$RuO$_4$. At moderate fields and temperatures a lattice of triangular symmetry is observed, crossing over to a lattice of square symmetry with increasing field and temperature. At lower fields it is found that there are large regions of the sample that are completely free from vortices which grow in volume as the temperature falls. Importantly this is accompanied by {\it increasing} vortex density and increasing disorder within the vortex-cluster containing regions. Both effects are expected to result from the strongly temperature-dependent long-range vortex attractive forces arising from the multi-band chiral-order superconductivity.
  • We present a design for a switchable nanomagnetic atom mirror formed by an array of 180{\deg} domain walls confined within Ni80Fe20 planar nanowires. A simple analytical model is developed which allows the magnetic field produced by the domain wall array to be calculated. This model is then used to optimize the geometry of the nanowires so as to maximize the reflectivity of the atom mirror. We then describe the fabrication of a nanowire array and characterize its magnetic behavior using magneto-optic Kerr effect magnetometry, scanning Hall probe microscopy and micromagnetic simulations, demonstrating how the mobility of the domain walls allow the atom mirror to be switched "on" and "off" in a manner which would be impossible for conventional designs. Finally, we model the reflection of 87Rb atoms from the atom mirror's surface, showing that our design is well suited for investigating interactions between domain walls and cold atoms.
  • We demonstrate the presence of an important anisotropic magnetoresistance contribution to the domain wall resistance recently measured in thin-film (Ga,Mn)As with in-plane magnetic anisotropy. Analytic results for simple domain wall orientations supplemented by numerical results for more general cases show this previously omitted contribution can largely explain the observed negative resistance.
  • We demonstrate experimentally that the micromagnetic profile of the out-of-plane component of magnetic induction, B_z, in the crossing lattices regime of layered superconductors can be manipulated by varying the in-plane magnetic field, H_{||}. Moving Josephson vortices drag/push pancake vortex stacks, and the magnetic profile, B_z(x), can be controllably sculpted across the entire single crystal sample. Depending on the H-history and temperature we can increase or decrease the flux density at the center and near the edges of the crystal by as much as 40%, realising both 'convex' and 'concave' magnetic flux lenses. Our experimental results are well described by molecular dynamics simulations.