• We report on the results from a search for dark matter axions with the HAYSTAC experiment using a microwave cavity detector at frequencies between 5.6-5.8$\, \rm Ghz$. We exclude axion models with two photon coupling $g_{a\gamma\gamma}\,\gtrsim\,2\times10^{-14}\,\rm GeV^{-1}$, a factor of 2.7 above the benchmark KSVZ model over the mass range 23.15$\,<\,$$m_a \,$<$\,$24.0$\,\mu\rm eV$. This doubles the range reported in our previous paper. We achieve a near-quantum-limited sensitivity by operating at a temperature $T<h\nu/2k_B$ and incorporating a Josephson parametric amplifier (JPA), with improvements in the cooling of the cavity further reducing the experiment's system noise temperature to only twice the Standard Quantum Limit at its operational frequency, an order of magnitude better than any other dark matter microwave cavity experiment to date. This result concludes the first phase of the HAYSTAC program utilizing a conventional copper cavity and a single JPA.
  • We report here several technical improvements to the HAYSTAC (Haloscope at Yale Sensitive To Axion Cold dark matter) that have improved operational efficiency, sensitivity, and stability.
  • The axion is a light pseudoscalar particle which suppresses CP-violating effects in strong interactions and also happens to be an excellent dark matter candidate. Axions constituting the dark matter halo of our galaxy may be detected by their resonant conversion to photons in a microwave cavity permeated by a magnetic field. The current generation of the microwave cavity experiment has demonstrated sensitivity to plausible axion models, and upgrades in progress should achieve the sensitivity required for a definitive search, at least for low mass axions. However, a comprehensive strategy for scanning the entire mass range, from 1-1000 $\mu$eV, will require significant technological advances to maintain the needed sensitivity at higher frequencies. Such advances could include sub-quantum-limited amplifiers based on squeezed vacuum states, bolometers, and/or superconducting microwave cavities. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment at High Frequencies (ADMX-HF) represents both a pathfinder for first data in the 20-100 $\mu$eV range ($\sim$5-25 GHz), and an innovation test-bed for these concepts.
  • We show that at higher frequencies, and thus higher axion masses, single-photon detectors become competitive and ultimately favored, when compared to quantum-limited linear amplifiers, as the detector technology in microwave cavity experimental searches for galactic halo dark matter axions. The cross-over point in this comparison is of order 10 GHz ($\sim 40\ \mu$eV), not far above the frequencies of current searches.
  • A description is presented of apparatus used to carry out an experimental search for an electric dipole moment of the neutron, at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble. The experiment incorporated a cohabiting atomic-mercury magnetometer in order to reduce spurious signals from magnetic field fluctuations. The result has been published in an earlier letter; here, the methods and equipment used are discussed in detail.
  • A number of experimental measurements of the Casimir force have observed a logarithmic distance variation of the voltage that minimizes electrostatic force between the plates in a sphere-plane geometry. We show that this variation can be simply understood from a geometric averaging of surface potential patches together with the Proximity Force Approximation.
  • The imperfect termination of static electric fields at semiconducting surfaces has been long known in solid state and transistor physics. We show that the imperfect shielding leads to an offset in the distance between two surfaces as determined by electrostatic force measurements. The effect exists even in the case of good conductors (metals) albeit much reduced.
  • A new systematic correction for Casimir force measurements is proposed and applied to the results of an experiment that was performed more than a decade ago. This correction brings the experimental results into good agreement with the Drude model of the metallic plates' permittivity. The systematic is due to time-dependent fluctuations in the distance between the plates caused by mechanical vibrations or tilt, or position measurement uncertainty, and is similar to the correction for plate roughness.
  • We present calculations of contact potential surface patch effects that simplify previous treatments. It is shown that, because of the linearity of Laplace's equation, the presence of patch potentials does not affect an electrostatic calibration (of force and/or distance) of a two-plate Casimir measurement apparatus. Using models that include long-range variations in the contact potential across the plate surfaces, a number of experimental observations can be reproduced and explained. For these models, numerical calculations show that if a voltage is applied between the plates which minimizes the force, a residual electrostatic force persists, and that the minimizing potential varies with distance. The residual force can be described by a fit to a simple two-parameter function involving the minimizing potential and its variation with distance. We show the origin of this residual force by use of a simple parallel capacitor model. Finally, the implications of a residual force that varies in a manner different from 1/d on the accuracy of previous Casimir measurements is discussed.
  • The next generation of particle edm searches will be at such a high sensitivity that it will be possible for the results to be contaminated by a systematic error resulting from the interaction of the motional (E x v/c) magnetic field with stray field gradients. In this paper we extend previous work to present an analytic form for the frequency shift in the case of a rectangular storage vessel and discuss the implications of the result for the neutron edm experiment which will be installed at the SNS (Spallation Neutron Source) by the LANL collaboration
  • We develop and present a quantum cryptography concept in which phase determinations are made from the time that a photon is detected, as opposed to where the photon is detected, and hence is a non-interferometric process. The phase-encoded quantum information is contained in temporal and polarization superpositions of single photon states, forming a complex qudit of Hilbert dimension D equal to or greater than 4. Based on this, we have developed a new quantum key distribution protocol that allows the generation of secret key in the presence of higher noise than is possible with other protocols.
  • The role of 3He-3He collisions in our diffusion experiment is addressed and shown to not be relevant to the measurement of 3He diffusion against phonons in superfluid helium.
  • We point out that the rotation of the Earth leads to a non-negligible apparent electric-dipole moment effect for this experiment.
  • The search for particle electric dipole moments (edm) represents a most promising way to search for physics beyond the standard model. A number of groups are planning a new generation of experiments using stored gases of various kinds. In order to achieve the target sensitivities it will be necessary to deal with the systematic error resulting from the interaction of the well-known $\overrightarrow{v}\times \overrightarrow{E}$ field with magnetic field gradients (often referred to as the geometric phase effect (Commins, ED; Am. J. Phys. \QTR{bf}{59}, 1077 (1991), Pendlebury, JM \QTR{em}{et al;} Phys. Rev. \QTR{bf}{A70}, 032102 (2004)). This interaction produces a frequency shift linear in the electric field, mimicking an edm. In this work we introduce an analytic form for the velocity auto-correlation function which determines the velocity-position correlation function which in turn determines the behavior of the frequency shift (Lamoreaux, SK and Golub, R; Phys. Rev \QTR{bf}{A71}, 032104 (2005)) and show how it depends on the operating conditions of the experiment. We also discuss some additional issues.
  • The search for particle electric dipole moments represents a most promising way to search for physics beyond the standard model. A number of groups are planning a new generation of experiments using stored gases of various kinds. In order to achieve the target sensitivities it will be necessary to deal with the systematic error resulting from the interaction of the well-known E x v field with magnetic field gradients (often referred to as the geometric phase effect [9,10]). This interaction produces a frequency shift linear in the electric field, mimicking an edm. In this work we introduce an analytic model for the correlation function which determines the behavior of the frequency shift [11], and show in detail how it depends on the operating conditions of the experiment. We also propose a method to directly measure ths correlation function under the exact conditions of a given experiment.
  • The search for particle electric dipole moments (edm) is one of the best places to look for physics beyond the standard model because the size of time reversal violation predicted by the standard model is incompatible with present ideas concerning the creation of the Baryon-Antibaryon asymmetry. As the sensitivity of these edm searches increases more subtle systematic effects become important. We develop a general analytical approach to describe a systematic effect recently observed in an electric dipole moment experiment using stored particles \cite{JMP}. Our approach is based on the relationship between the systematic frequency shift and the velocity autocorrelation function of the resonating particles. Our results, when applied to well-known limiting forms of the correlation function, are in good agreement with both the limiting cases studied in recent work that employed a numerical/heuristic analysis. Our general approach explains some of the surprising results observed in that work and displays the rich behavior of the shift for intermediate frequencies, which has not been previously studied.
  • A general analysis of thermal noise in torsion pendulums is presented. The specific case where the torsion angle is kept fixed by electronic feedback is analyzed. This analysis is applied to a recent experiment that employed a torsion pendulum to measure the Casimir force. The ultimate limit to the distance at which the Casimir force can be measured to high accuracy is discussed, and in particular the prospects for measuring the thermal correction are elaborated upon.
  • The frequency spectrum of the finite temperature correction to the Casimir force can be determined by use of the Lifshitz formalism for metallic plates of finite conductivity. We show that the correction for the $TE$ electromagnetic modes is dominated by frequencies so low that the plates cannot be modelled as ideal dielectrics. We also address issues relating to the behavior of electromagnetic fields at the surfaces and within metallic conductors, and calculate the surface modes using appropriate low-frequency metallic boundary conditions. Our result brings the thermal correction into agreement with experimental results that were previously obtained. We suggest a series of measurements that will test the veracity of our analysis.
  • The frequency spectrum of the finite temperature correction to the Casimir force can be determined by the use of the Lifshitz formalism for metallic plates of finite conductivity. We show that the correction for the TE electromagnetic modes is dominated by frequencies so low that the plates cannot be modelled as ideal dielectrics. We also address the issues relating to the behavior of electromagnetic fields at the surfaces an within metallic conductors, and claculate the surface modes using appropriate low-frequency metallic boundary conditions. Our result brings the tehrmal correction into agreement with experimental results that were previously obtained.
  • In the analysis of the Oklo (gabon) natural reactor to test for a possible time variation of the fine structure constant alpha, a Maxwell-Boltzmann low energy neutron spectrum was assumed. We present here an analysis where a more realistic spectrum is employed and show that the most recent isotopic analysis of samples implies a non-zero change in alpha, over the last two billion years since the reactor was operating, of \Delta\alpha/\alpha\geq 4.5\times 10^{-8} (6\sigma confidence). Issues regarding the interpretation of the shifts of the low energy neutron resonances are discussed.
  • We present experimental measurements of the properties of a liquid "Fomblin" surface obtained by the quasielastic scattering of laser light. The properties include the surface tension and viscosity as a function of temperature. The results are compared to the measurements of the bulk fluid properties. We then calculate the upscattering rate of ultracold neutrons (UCN) from thermally excited surface capillary waves on the liquid surface and compare the results to experimental measurements of the UCN lifetime in Fomblin fluid-walled UCN storage bottles, and show that the excess loss rate for UCN energies near the Fomblin potential can be explained. The rapid temperature dependence of the Fomblin storage lifetime is explained by our analysis.
  • In 1968, F.L. Shapiro published the suggestion that one could search for an electron EDM by applying a strong electric field to a substance that has an unpaired electron spin; at low temperature, the EDM interaction would lead to a net sample magnetization that can be detected with a SQUID magnetometer. One experimental EDM search based on this technique was published, and for a number of reasons including high sample conductivity, high operating temperature, and limited SQUID technology, the result was not particularly sensitive compared to other experiments in the late 1970's. Advances in SQUID and conventional magnetometery had led us to reconsider this type of experiment, which can be extended to searches and tests other than EDMs (e.g., test of Lorentz invariance). In addition, the complementary measurement of an EDM-induced sample electric polarization due to application of a magnetic field to a paramagnetic sample might be effective using modern ultrasensitive charge measurement techniques. A possible paramagnetic material is Gd-substituted YIG which has very low conductivity and a net enhancement (atomic enhancement times crystal screening) of order unity. Use of a reasonable volume (100's of cc) sample of this material at 50 mK and 10 kV/cm might yield an electron EDM sensitivity of $10^{-33}$ e cm or better, a factor of $10^6$ improvement over current experimental limits.
  • We have measured the mass diffusion coefficient D of 3He in superfluid 4He at temperatures lower than were previously possible. The experimental technique utilizes scintillation light produced when neutron react with 3He nuclei, and allows measurement of the 3He density integrated along the trajectory of a well-defined neutron beam. By measuring the change in 3He density near a heater as a function of applied heat current, we are able to infer values of D with 20% accuracy. At temperatures below 0.7 K and for concentrations of order 10^{-4} we find D=(2.0+2.4-1.2)T^-(6.5 -/+ 1.2) cm^2/s, in agreement with a theoretical approximation.
  • A calculation of ultra-cold neutron (UCN) upscattering rates in molecular deuterium solids has been carried out, taking into account intra-molecular exictations and phonons. The different moelcular species ortho-D2 (with even rotational quantum number J) and para-D2 (with odd J) exhibit significantly different UCN-phonon annihilation cross-sections. Para- to ortho-D2 conversion, furthermore, couples UCN to an energy bath of excited rotational states without mediating phonons. This anomalous upscattering mechanism restricts the UCN lifetime to 4.6 msec in a normal-D2 solid with 33% para content.
  • Quantum key distribution (QKD) has been demonstrated over a point-to-point $\sim1.6$-km atmospheric optical path in full daylight. This record transmission distance brings QKD a step closer to surface-to-satellite and other long-distance applications.