• We describe data release 3 (DR3) of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The GAMA survey is a spectroscopic redshift and multi-wavelength photometric survey in three equatorial regions each of 60.0 deg^2 (G09, G12, G15), and two southern regions of 55.7 deg^2 (G02) and 50.6 deg^2 (G23). DR3 consists of: the first release of data covering the G02 region and of data on H-ATLAS sources in the equatorial regions; and updates to data on sources released in DR2. DR3 includes 154809 sources with secure redshifts across four regions. A subset of the G02 region is 95.5% redshift complete to r<19.8 over an area of 19.5 deg^2, with 20086 galaxy redshifts, that overlaps substantially with the XXL survey (X-ray) and VIPERS (redshift survey). In the equatorial regions, the main survey has even higher completeness (98.5%), and spectra for about 75% of H-ATLAS filler targets were also obtained. This filler sample extends spectroscopic redshifts, for probable optical counterparts to H-ATLAS sub-mm sources, to 0.8 mag deeper (r<20.6) than the GAMA main survey. There are 25814 galaxy redshifts for H-ATLAS sources from the GAMA main or filler surveys. GAMA DR3 is available at the survey website (www.gama-survey.org/dr3/).
  • The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is one of the largest contemporary spectroscopic surveys of low-redshift galaxies. Covering an area of ~286 deg^2 (split among five survey regions) down to a limiting magnitude of r < 19.8 mag, we have collected spectra and reliable redshifts for 238,000 objects using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. In addition, we have assembled imaging data from a number of independent surveys in order to generate photometry spanning the wavelength range 1 nm - 1 m. Here we report on the recently completed spectroscopic survey and present a series of diagnostics to assess its final state and the quality of the redshift data. We also describe a number of survey aspects and procedures, or updates thereof, including changes to the input catalogue, redshifting and re-redshifting, and the derivation of ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry. Finally, we present the second public release of GAMA data. In this release we provide input catalogue and targeting information, spectra, redshifts, ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry, single-component S\'ersic fits, stellar masses, H$\alpha$-derived star formation rates, environment information, and group properties for all galaxies with r < 19.0 mag in two of our survey regions, and for all galaxies with r < 19.4 mag in a third region (72,225 objects in total). The database serving these data is available at http://www.gama-survey.org/.
  • Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) is a project to study galaxy formation and evolution, combining imaging data from ultraviolet to radio with spectroscopic data from the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. Using data from phase 1 of GAMA, taken over three observing seasons, and correcting for various minor sources of incompleteness, we calculate galaxy luminosity functions (LFs) and their evolution in the ugriz passbands. At low redshift, z < 0.1, we find that blue galaxies, defined according to a magnitude-dependent but non-evolving colour cut, are reasonably well fit over a range of more than ten magnitudes by simple Schechter functions in all bands. Red galaxies, and the combined blue-plus-red sample, require double power-law Schechter functions to fit a dip in their LF faintward of the characteristic magnitude M* before a steepening faint end. This upturn is at least partly due to dust-reddened disk galaxies. We measure evolution of the galaxy LF over the redshift range 0.002 < z < 0.5 using both a parametric fit and by measuring binned LFs in redshift slices. The characteristic luminosity L* is found to increase with redshift in all bands, with red galaxies showing stronger luminosity evolution than blue galaxies. The comoving number density of blue galaxies increases with redshift, while that of red galaxies decreases, consistent with prevailing movement from blue cloud to red sequence. As well as being more numerous at higher redshift, blue galaxies also dominate the overall luminosity density beyond redshifts z = 0.2. At lower redshifts, the luminosity density is dominated by red galaxies in the riz bands, by blue galaxies in u and g.
  • We investigate the properties of satellite galaxies that surround isolated hosts within the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.15, using data taken as part of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. Making use of isolation and satellite criteria that take into account stellar mass estimates, we find 3514 isolated galaxies of which 1426 host a total of 2998 satellites. Separating the red and blue populations of satellites and hosts, using colour-mass diagrams, we investigate the radial distribution of satellite galaxies and determine how the red fraction of satellites varies as a function of satellite mass, host mass and the projected distance from their host. Comparing the red fraction of satellites to a control sample of small neighbours at greater projected radii, we show that the increase in red fraction is primarily a function of host mass. The satellite red fraction is about 0.2 higher than the control sample for hosts with 11.0 < log M_* < 11.5, while the red fractions show no difference for hosts with 10.0 < log M_* < 10.5. For the satellites of more massive hosts the red fraction also increases as a function of decreasing projected distance. Our results suggest that the likely main mechanism for the quenching of star formation in satellites hosted by isolated galaxies is strangulation.
  • Using the complete GAMA-I survey covering ~142 sq. deg. to r=19.4, of which ~47 sq. deg. is to r=19.8, we create the GAMA-I galaxy group catalogue (G3Cv1), generated using a friends-of-friends (FoF) based grouping algorithm. Our algorithm has been tested extensively on one family of mock GAMA lightcones, constructed from Lambda-CDM N-body simulations populated with semi-analytic galaxies. Recovered group properties are robust to the effects of interlopers and are median unbiased in the most important respects. G3Cv1 contains 14,388 galaxy groups (with multiplicity >= 2$), including 44,186 galaxies out of a possible 110,192 galaxies, implying ~40% of all galaxies are assigned to a group. The similarities of the mock group catalogues and G3Cv1 are multiple: global characteristics are in general well recovered. However, we do find a noticeable deficit in the number of high multiplicity groups in GAMA compared to the mocks. Additionally, despite exceptionally good local spatial completeness, G3Cv1 contains significantly fewer compact groups with 5 or more members, this effect becoming most evident for high multiplicity systems. These two differences are most likely due to limitations in the physics included of the current GAMA lightcone mock. Further studies using a variety of galaxy formation models are required to confirm their exact origin.
  • QSOs from SDSS, 2QZ and 2SLAQ covering an order of magnitude in luminosity at fixed redshift exhibit similar amplitudes of clustering. In addition, QSO clustering evolution at z>0.5 is well fitted by a model that assumes a fixed host halo mass, implying that QSOs may occur in a relatively narrow range of halo and BH mass. We argue that the slow evolution of early-type galaxies out to z~1-2 may also provide support for a slow evolution of QSO host BH masses. The result would mean that if high-z QSOs radiate at Eddington rates then low-z SyI must radiate at ~100x less than Eddington. We conclude that models where QSOs radiate at L_Edd require M_BH and M_halo to be decoupled to circumvent the clustering results. While single BH mass and flickering models fit the z>0.5 clustering results, they appear to be rejected by the z~0, M_BH-L relation from reverberation mapping. We find that the inclusion of z<0.5 QSO clustering data improves the fit of a long-lived QSO model and suggest that the predictions of a PLE model for QSO BH masses agree reasonably with UV-bump and reverberation estimates (abridged).
  • We present an analysis of the properties of the lowest Halpha-luminosity galaxies (L_Halpha<4x10^32 W; SFR<0.02 Msun/yr) in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. These galaxies make up the the rise above a Schechter function in the number density of systems seen at the faint end of the Halpha luminosity function. Above our flux limit we find that these galaxies are principally composed of intrinsically low stellar mass systems (median stellar mass =2.5x10^8 Msun) with only 5/90 having stellar masses M>10^10 Msun. The low SFR systems are found to exist predominantly in the lowest density environments (median density ~0.02 galaxy Mpc^-2 with none in environments more dense than ~1.5 galaxy Mpc^-2). Their current specific star formation rates (SSFR; -8.5 < log(SSFR[yr^-1])<-12.) are consistent with their having had a variety of star formation histories. The low density environments of these galaxies demonstrates that such low-mass, star-forming systems can only remain as low-mass and forming stars if they reside sufficiently far from other galaxies to avoid being accreted, dispersed through tidal effects or having their gas reservoirs rendered ineffective through external processes.
  • A heuristic greedy algorithm is developed for efficiently tiling spatially dense redshift surveys. In its first application to the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) redshift survey we find it rapidly improves the spatial uniformity of our data, and naturally corrects for any spatial bias introduced by the 2dF multi object spectrograph. We make conservative predictions for the final state of the GAMA redshift survey after our final allocation of time, and can be confident that even if worse than typical weather affects our observations, all of our main survey requirements will be met.
  • We report on the AAT-AAOmega LRG Pilot observing run to establish the feasibility of a large spectroscopic survey using the new AAOmega instrument. We have selected Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) using single epoch SDSS riz-photometry to i<20.5 and z<20.2. We have observed in 3 fields including the COSMOS field and the COMBO-17 S11 field, obtaining a sample of ~600 redshift z>=0.5 LRGs. Exposure times varied from 1 - 4 hours to determine the minimum exposure for AAOmega to make an essentially complete LRG redshift survey in average conditions. We show that LRG redshifts to i<20.5 can measured in approximately 1.5hr exposures and present comparisons with 2SLAQ and COMBO-17 (photo-)redshifts. Crucially, the riz selection coupled with the 3-4 times improved AAOmega throughput is shown to extend the LRG mean redshift from z=0.55 for 2SLAQ to z=0.681+/- 0.005 for riz-selected LRGs. This extended range is vital for maximising the S/N for the detection of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs). Furthermore, we show that the amplitude of LRG clustering is s_0 = 9.9+/-0.7 h^-1 Mpc, as high as that seen in the 2SLAQ LRG Survey. Consistent results for the real-space amplitude are found from projected and semi-projected correlation functions. This high clustering amplitude is consistent with a long-lived population whose bias evolves as predicted by a simple ``high-peaks'' model. We conclude that a redshift survey of 360 000 LRGs over 3000deg^2, with an effective volume some 4 times bigger than previously used to detect BAO with LRGs, is possible with AAOmega in 170 nights.
  • Context: X-ray surveys of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) indicate `cosmic downsizing', with the comoving number density of high-luminosity objects peaking at higher redshifts (z about 2) than low-luminosity AGN (z<1). Aims: We test whether downsizing is caused by activity shifting towards low-mass black holes accreting at near-Eddington rates, or by a change in the average rate of accretion onto supermassive black holes. We estimate the black hole masses and Eddington ratios of an X-ray selected sample of AGN in the Chandra Deep Field South at z<1, probing the epoch where AGN cosmic downsizing has been reported. Methods: Black hole masses are estimated both from host galaxy stellar masses, which are estimated from fitting to published optical and near-infrared photometry, and from near-infrared luminosities, applying established correlations between black hole mass and host galaxy properties. Both methods give consistent results. Comparison and calibration of possible redshift-dependent effects is also made using published faint host galaxy velocity dispersion measurements. Results: The Eddington ratios in our sample span the range 10^{-5} to 1, with median log(L_bol/L_Edd)=-2.87, and with typical black hole masses about 10^{8} solar masses. The broad distribution of Eddington ratios is consistent with that expected for AGN samples at low and moderate luminosity. We find no evidence that the CDF-S AGN population is dominated by low-mass black holes accreting at near-Eddington ratios and the results suggest that diminishing accretion rates onto average-sized black holes are responsible for the reported AGN downsizing at redshifts below unity.
  • It is argued that supermassive black holes in the nuclei of galaxies most likely have grown coevally with their host dark matter halos. A calculation based on Press-Schechter within this framework shows that the mean rate of accretion of matter onto such black holes varies from a value about 0.003 of the Eddington rate at the present epoch to a value around 0.08 at redshift 3. The bulk of AGN evolution may be explained as a reflection of the diminishing rate of accretion of material onto galaxies. The result is almost independent of mass of host dark matter halo and is only weakly dependent on the values of cosmological parameters. At high redshifts, z greater than about 5, black holes in galaxies would have been accreting close to the Eddington limit, which is likely to lead to galactic outflows being ubiquitous at those epochs.
  • We have used the 2dF instrument on the AAT to obtain redshifts of a sample of z<3, 18.0<g<21.85 quasars selected from SDSS imaging. These data are part of a larger joint programme: the 2dF-SDSS LRG and QSO Survey (2SLAQ). We describe the quasar selection algorithm and present the resulting luminosity function of 5645 quasars in 105.7 deg^2. The bright end number counts and luminosity function agree well with determinations from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ) data to g\sim20.2. However, at the faint end the 2SLAQ number counts and luminosity function are steeper than the final 2QZ results from Croom et al. (2004), but are consistent with the preliminary 2QZ results from Boyle et al. (2000). Using the functional form adopted for the 2QZ analysis, we find a faint end slope of beta=-1.78+/-0.03 if we allow all of the parameters to vary and beta=-1.45+/-0.03 if we allow only the faint end slope and normalization to vary. Our maximum likelihood fit to the data yields 32% more quasars than the final 2QZ parameterization, but is not inconsistent with other g>21 deep surveys. The 2SLAQ data exhibit no well defined ``break'' but do clearly flatten with increasing magnitude. The shape of the quasar luminosity function derived from 2SLAQ is in good agreement with that derived from type I quasars found in hard X-ray surveys. [Abridged]
  • Co-addition of blank-field FIRST data at the location of over 8000 QSOs in the 2QZ survey has yielded statistical detections of radio quiet QSOs with median flux levels of 20-40microJy. We show that the total radio flux of radio-quiet QSOs in the 2QZ is consistent with a smooth extrapolation of the 2QZ radio-loud QSO number-flux distribution based on the slope of the relation flattening near the FIRST flux limit. However, we are unable to distinguish a smooth extrapolation of the luminosity function to faint levels from a bimodal luminosity function with a break close to or below the FIRST radio detection limit. We also demonstrate that the redshift dependence of the median radio-to-optical spectral index for these radio quiet QSOs is consistent with that obtained for individual radio-loud 2QZ QSOs detected by FIRST.
  • We present the final catalogue of the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ), based on Anglo-Australian Telescope 2dF spectroscopic observations of 44576 colour-selected (u b_J r) objects with 18.25<b_J<20.85 selected from APM scans of UK Schmidt Telescope (UKST) photographic plates. The 2QZ comprises 23338 QSOs, 12292 galactic stars (including 2071 white dwarfs) and 4558 compact narrow-emission-line galaxies. We obtained a reliable spectroscopic identification for 86 per cent of objects observed with 2dF. We also report on the 6dF QSO Redshift Survey (6QZ), based on UKST 6dF observations of 1564 brighter 16<b_J<18.25 sources selected from the same photographic input catalogue. In total, we identified 322 QSOs spectroscopically in the 6QZ. The completed 2QZ is, by more than a factor 50, the largest homogeneous QSO catalogue ever constructed at these faint limits (b_J<20.85) and high QSO surface densities (35 QSOs deg^-2). As such it represents an important resource in the study of the Universe at moderate-to-high redshifts. As an example of the results possible with the 2QZ, we also present our most recent analysis of the optical QSO luminosity function and its cosmological evolution with redshift. For a flat, Omega_m=0.3 and Omega_lam=0.7, Universe, we find that a double power law with luminosity evolution that is exponential in look-back time, t, of the form L*(z) exp(6.15t), equivalent to an e-folding time of 2Gyr, provides an acceptable fit to the redshift dependence of the QSO luminosity function over the range 0.4 < z < 2.1 and M_bJ<-22.5. Evolution described by a quadratic in redshift is also an acceptable fit, with L*(z)~10^(1.39z-0.29z^2).
  • We have generated a series of composite QSO spectra using over 22000 individual low resolution (~8A) QSO spectra obtained from the 2dF (18.25<bj<20.85) and 6dF (16<bj<18.25) QSO Redshift Surveys. The large size of the catalogue has enabled us to construct composite spectra in narrow redshift (dz=0.25) and absolute magnitude (dMb=0.5) bins. The median number of QSOs in each composite is ~200, yielding typical S/N of ~100. For a given redshift interval, the composite spectra cover a factor of over 25 in luminosity. Using the composite spectra we have measured the equivalent widths (EWs) of the major broad and narrow emission lines, and the CaII K absorption feature due to the host galaxy of the AGN. Assuming a fixed host galaxy spectral energy distribution (SED), the correlation between CaII K EW and luminosity implies Lgal proportional to Lqso**{0.42+-0.05}. We find strong anti-correlations with luminosity for the EWs of [OII] and [NeV]. These provide hints to the general fading of the NLR in high luminosity sources which we attribute to the NLR dimensions becoming larger than the host galaxy. If average AGN host galaxies have SEDs similar to average galaxies, then the observed narrow [OII] emission could be solely due to the host galaxy at low luminosities (M_B~-20). We measure highly significant Baldwin effects for most broad emission lines (CIV, CIII], MgII, Hbeta, Hgamma) and show that they are predominantly due to correlations with luminosity, not redshift. We find that the Hbeta and Hgamma Balmer lines show an inverse Baldwin effect and are positively correlated with luminosity, unlike the broad UV lines. We postulate that this previously unknown effect is due to a luminosity dependent change in the the ratio of disk to non-disk continuum components (abridged).
  • We present clustering results from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ) which currently contains over 20,000 QSOs at z<3. The two-point correlation function of QSOs averaged over the entire survey (<z>~1.5) is found to be similar to that of local galaxies. When sub-dividing the sample as a function of redshift, we find that for an Einstein-de Sitter universe QSO clustering is constant (in comoving coordinates) over the entire redshift range probed by the 2QZ, while in a universe with Omega_0=0.3 and Lambda_0=0.7 there is a marginal increase in clustering with redshift. Sub-dividing the 2QZ on the basis of apparent magnitude we find only a slight difference between the clustering of QSOs of different apparent brightness, with the brightest QSOs having marginally stronger clustering. We have made a first measurement of the redshift space distortion of QSO clustering, with the goal of determining the value of cosmological parameters (in partcular Lambda_0) from geometric distortions. The current data do not allow us to discriminate between models, however, in combination with constraints from the evolution of mass clustering we find Omega_0=1-Lambda_0=0.23 +0.44-0.13 and beta(z~1.4)=0.39 +0.18-0.17. The full 2QZ data set will provide further cosmological constraints.
  • We have optically identified a sample of 56 featureless continuum objects without significant proper motion from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ). The steep number--magnitude relation of the sample, $n(\bj) \propto 10^{0.7\bj}$, is similar to that derived for QSOs in the 2QZ and inconsistent with any population of Galactic objects. Follow up high resolution, high signal-to-noise, spectroscopy of five randomly selected objects confirms the featureless nature of these sources. Assuming the objects in the sample to be largely featureless AGN, and using the QSO evolution model derived for the 2QZ, we predict the median redshift of the sample to be $z=1.1$. This model also reproduces the observed number-magnitude relation of the sample using a renormalisation of the QSO luminosity function, $\Phi^* = \Phi^*_{\rm \sc qso}/66 \simeq 1.65 \times 10^{-8} $mag$^{-1}$Mpc$^{-3}$. Only $\sim$20 per cent of the objects have a radio flux density of $S_{1.4}>3 $mJy, and further VLA observations at 8.4 GHz place a $5\sigma$ limit of $S_{8.4} < 0.2$mJy on the bulk of the sample. We postulate that these objects could form a population of radio-weak AGN with weak or absent emission lines, whose optical spectra are indistinguishable from those of BL Lac objects.
  • We describe a method from which cosmology may be constrained from the 2QZ Survey. By comparing clustering properties parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight and by modeling the effects of redshift space distortions, we are able to study geometric distortions in the clustering pattern which occur if a wrong cosmology is assumed when translating redshifts into comoving distances. Using mock 2QZ catalogues, drawn from the Hubble Volume simulation, we find, that there is a degeneracy between the geometric and the redshift-space distortions that makes it difficult to obtain an unambiguous estimate of Omega_{m}(0) from the geometric tests alone. However, we demonstrate a new method to determine the cosmology which works by combining the above geometric test with a test based on the evolution of the QSO clustering amplitude. We find that we are able to break the degeneracy and that independent constraints to +-20% (1 sigma) accuracy on Omega_{m}(0) and +-10% (1 sigma) accuracy on beta_{QSO}(z) should be possible in the full 2QZ survey. Finally we apply the method to the 10k catalogue of 2QZ QSOs. The smaller number of QSOs and the current status of the Survey mean that a strong result on cosmology is not possible but we do constrain beta_{QSO}(z) to 0.35+-0.2. By combining this constraint with the further constraint available from the amplitude of QSO clustering, we find tentative evidence favouring a model with non-zero Omega_{Lambda}(0), although an Omega_{m}(0)=1 model provides only a marginally less good fit. A model with Omega_{Lambda}(0)=1 is ruled out. The results are in agreement with those found by Outram et al. using a similar analysis in Fourier space. (Abridged)
  • With approximately 6000 QSO redshifts,the 2dF QSO redshift survey is already the biggest complete QSO survey. The aim for the survey is to have 25000 QSO redshifts, providing an order of magnitude increase in QSO clustering statistics. We first describe the observational parameters of the 2dF QSO survey. We then describe several highlights of the survey so far, including new estimates of the QSO luminosity function and its evolution. We also review the current status of QSO clustering analyses from the 2dF data. Finally, we discuss how the complete QSO survey will be able to constrain the value of Omega_o by measuring the evolution of QSO clustering, place limits on the cosmological constant via a direct geometrical test and determine the form of the fluctuation power-spectrum out to the approximately 1000 Mpc scales only previously probed by COBE.
  • We investigate the anti-correlation between faint high redshift QSOs and low redshift galaxy groups found by Boyle, Fong & Shanks (1988), on the assumption that it is caused by gravitational lensing of a flat QSO number count, rather than any other systematic effect (e.g dust). An isothermal sphere lens model, requires a velocity dispersion of 1286+72-91 km/s. Addition of a constant density plane reduces this to 1143+109-153 km/s, while the plane density is 0.081+-0.032h g/cm**2. Both these values are considerably larger than the 400-600km/s expected for poor clusters and groups and imply that the mass associated with such groups is ~4 times larger than inferred from virial analyses. If due to lensing, this measurement clearly tends to favour high values of Omega_0. We demonstrate how an estimate of Omega_0 may be obtained, finding Omega_0=1.3(n/3x10^-4h^3Mpc^-3)(r/1Mpc)(sigma/1286km/s)^2. Systematic uncertainties in r, the extent of the anti-correlation, and n, the group space density, currently dominate this determination, but this will be a route to estimating Omega_0 in improved galaxy-QSO datasets where systematics can be better controlled. We compared our result to that of Williams & Irwin (1998) who find a positive correlation between bright LBQS QSOs and APM galaxies. Adapting the analysis of Williams & Irwin to our use of galaxy groups, we find agreement between the amplitude of the positive cross-correlation found for bright QSOs and the negative cross-correlation found for faint QSOs. This analysis leads to a common estimate of Omega_0*sigma_8~3-4. This, however, is significantly higher than indicated from several other analyses. Further tests of the accuracy of galaxy-QSO cross-correlations and their implications for Omega_0 and sigma_8 will soon be available from the new 2dF QSO catalogue.