• Presented are the first interferometric images of cool starspots on the chromospherically active giant $\lambda$ Andromedae. These images represent the first model-independent images of cool starspots on a star other than the Sun to date. The interferometric observations, taken with the Michigan Infra-Red Combiner coupled to the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy Array, span 26 days from Aug 17$^{th}$, 2008 to Sep 24$^{th}$, 2011. The photometric time series acquired at Fairborn Observatory spanning Sep 20$^{th}$, 2008 to Jan 20$^{th}$, 2011 is also presented. The angular diameter and power law limb-darkening coefficient of this star are 2.759 $\pm$ 0.050 mas and 0.229 $\pm$ 0.111, respectively. Starspot properties are obtained from both modeled and SQUEEZE reconstructed images. The images from 2010 through 2011 show anywhere from one to four starspots. The measured properties of identical starspots identified in both the model and reconstructed images are within two $\sigma$ error bars in 51$\%$ of cases. The cadence in the data for the 2010 and 2011 data sets are sufficient to measure a stellar rotation period based on apparent starspot motion. This leads to estimates of the rotation period (P$_{2010}$ = 60 $\pm$ 13 days, P$_{2011}$ = 54.0 $\pm$ 7.6 days) that are consistent with the photometrically determined period of 54.8 days. In addition, the inclination and position angle of the rotation axis is computed for both the 2010 and 2011 data sets; values ($\bar{\Psi}$ = 21.5$\degree$, $\bar{\emph{i}}$ = 78.0$\degree$) for each are nearly identical between the two years. \end{abstract}
  • The mass-loss process in Mira stars probably occurs in an asymmetric way where dust can form in inhomogeneous circumstellar molecular clumps. Following asymmetries along the pulsation cycle can give us clues about these mass-loss processes. We imaged the Mira star X Hya and its environnement at different epochs to follow the evolution of the morphology in the continuum and in the molecular bands. We observed X Hya with AMBER in J-H-K at low resolution at two epochs. We modelled squared visibilities with geometrical and physical models. We also present imaging reconstruction results obtained with MiRA and based on the physical a priori images. We report on the angular scale change of X Hya between the two epochs. 1D CODEX profiles allowed us to understand and model the spectral variation of squared visibilities and constrain the stellar parameters. Reconstructed model-dependent images enabled us to reproduce closure phase signals and the azimuthal dependence of squared visibilities. They show evidence for material inhomogeneities located in the immediate environment of the star.
  • The rapidly rotating Be star phi Persei was spun up by mass and angular momentum transfer from a now stripped-down, hot subdwarf companion. Here we present the first high angular resolution images of phi Persei made possible by new capabilities in longbaseline interferometry at near-IR and visible wavelengths. We observed phi Persei with the MIRC and VEGA instruments of the CHARA Array. Additional MIRC-only observations were performed to track the orbital motion of the companion, and these were fit together with new and existing radial velocity measurements of both stars to derive the complete orbital elements and distance. The hot subdwarf companion is clearly detected in the near-IR data at each epoch of observation with a flux contribution of 1.5% in the H band, and restricted fits indicate that its flux contribution rises to 3.3% in the visible. A new binary orbital solution is determined by combining the astrometric and radial velocity measurements. The derived stellar masses are 9.6+-0.3Msol and 1.2+-0.2Msol for the Be primary and subdwarf secondary, respectively. The inferred distance (186 +- 3 pc), kinematical properties, and evolutionary state are consistent with membership of phi Persei in the alpha Per cluster. From the cluster age we deduce significant constraints on the initial masses and evolutionary mass transfer processes that transformed the phi Persei binary system. The interferometric data place strong constraints on the Be disk elongation, orientation, and kinematics, and the disk angular momentum vector is coaligned with and has the same sense of rotation as the orbital angular momentum vector. The VEGA visible continuum data indicate an elongated shape for the Be star itself, due to the combined effects of rapid rotation, partial obscuration of the photosphere by the circumstellar disk, and flux from the bright inner disk.
  • Optical interferometry is a powerful tool to investigate the close environment of AGB stars. With a spatial resolution of a few milli-arcseconds, it is even possible to image directly the surface of angularly large objects. This is of special interest forMira stars and red supergiants for which the dust-wind is initiated from or very close to the photosphere by an interplay between pulsation and convection. Based on two-epoch interferometric observations of the Mira star X Hya, we present how the variation of the angular size with wavelength challenges pulsation models and how reconstructed images can reveal the evolution of the object shape and of its asymmetric structures.
  • Two red supergiants of the Per OB1 association, RS Per and T Per, have been observed in H band using the MIRC instrument at the CHARA array. The data show clear evidence of departure from circular symmetry. We present here new techniques specially developed to analyze such cases, based on state-of-the-art statistical frameworks. The stellar surfaces are first modeled as limb-darkened discs based on SATLAS models that fit both MIRC interferometric data and publicly available spectrophotometric data. Bayesian model selection is then used to determine the most probable number of spots. The effective surface temperatures are also determined and give further support to the recently derived hotter temperature scales of red su- pergiants. The stellar surfaces are reconstructed by our model-independent imaging code SQUEEZE, making use of its novel regularizer based on Compressed Sensing theory. We find excellent agreement between the model-selection results and the reconstructions. Our results provide evidence for the presence of near-infrared spots representing about 3-5% of the stellar flux.
  • Near-infrared interferometers have recently imaged a number of rapidly rotating A-type stars, finding levels of gravity darkening inconsistent with theoretical expectations. Here, we present new imaging of both a cooler star {\beta} Cas (F2IV) and a hotter one {\alpha} Leo (B7V) using the CHARA array and the MIRC instrument at the H band. Adopting a solid-body rotation model with a simple gravity darkening prescription, we modeled the stellar geometric properties and surface temperature distributions, confirming both stars are rapidly rotating and show gravity darkening anomalies. We estimate the masses and ages of these rapid rotators on L-Rpol and HR diagrams constructed for non-rotating stars by tracking their non-rotating equivalents. The unexpected fast rotation of the evolved subgiant {\beta} Cas offers a unique test of the stellar core-envelope coupling, revealing quite efficient coupling over the past ~ 0.5 Gyr. Lastly we summarize all our interferometric determinations of the gravity darkening coefficient for rapid rotators, finding none match the expectations from the widely used von Zeipel gravity darkening laws. Since the conditions of the von Zeipel law are known to be violated for rapidly rotating stars, we recommend using the empirically-derived {\beta} = 0.19 for such stars with radiation-dominated envelopes. Furthermore, we note that no paradigm exists for self-consistently modeling heavily gravity-darkened stars that show hot radiative poles with cool convective equators.
  • This paper reports on H-band interferometric observations of Betelgeuse made at the three-telescope interferometer IOTA. We image Betelgeuse and its asymmetries to understand the spatial variation of the photosphere, including its diameter, limb darkening, effective temperature, surrounding brightness, and bright (or dark) star spots. We used different theoretical simulations of the photosphere and dusty environment to model the visibility data. We made images with parametric modeling and two image reconstruction algorithms: MIRA and WISARD. We measure an average limb-darkened diameter of 44.28 +/- 0.15 mas with linear and quadratic models and a Rosseland diameter of 45.03 +/- 0.12 mas with a MARCS model. These measurements lead us to derive an updated effective temperature of 3600 +/- 66 K. We detect a fully-resolved environment to which the silicate dust shell is likely to contribute. By using two imaging reconstruction algorithms, we unveiled two bright spots on the surface of Betelgeuse. One spot has a diameter of about 11 mas and accounts for about 8.5% of the total flux. The second one is unresolved (diameter < 9 mas) with 4.5% of the total flux. Resolved images of Betelgeuse in the H band are asymmetric at the level of a few percent. The MOLsphere is not detected in this wavelength range. The amount of measured limb-darkening is in good agreement with model predictions. The two spots imaged at the surface of the star are potential signatures of convective cells.
  • High-resolution R~50 000 long-slit spectroscopy of the inner knots of the highly symmetrical protostellar outflow HH 212 was obtained in the 1-0 S(1) line of H2 at 2.12 micron with a spatial resolution of ~0.45 arcsec. At the resulting velocity resolution of ~6 km s-1, multiple slit oriented observations of the northern first knot NK1 clearly show double-peaked line profiles consistent with either a radiative bow shock or dual (forward and reverse) shocks. In contrast, the velocity distribution of the southern first knot SK1 remains single-peaked, suggesting a significantly lower jet velocity and possibly a different density variation in the jet pulses in the southern flow compared to the northern flow. Comparison with a semi-empirical analytical model of bow shock emission allows us to constrain parameters such as the bow inclination to the line of sight, the bow shock and jet velocities for each flow. Although a few features are not reproduced by this model, it confirms the presence of several dynamical and kinematical asymmetries between opposite sides of the HH 212 bipolar jet. The position-velocity diagrams of both knots exhibit complex dynamics that are broadly consistent with emission from a bow shock and/or jet shock, which does not exclude jet rotation, although a clear signature of jet rotation in HH 212 is missing. Alternative interpretations of the variation of radial velocity across these knots, such as a variation in the jet orientation, as well as for the velocity asymmetries between the flows, are also considered. The presence of a correlation between flow velocity and collimation in each flow is suggested.
  • Many high contrast coronagraph designs have recently been proposed. In this paper, their suitability for direct imaging of extrasolar terrestrial planets is reviewed. We also develop a linear-algebra based model of coronagraphy that can both explain the behavior of existing coronagraphs and quantify the coronagraphic performance limit imposed by fundamental physics. We find that the maximum theoretical throughput of a coronagraph is equal to one minus the non-aberrated non-coronagraphic PSF of the telescope. We describe how a coronagraph reaching this fundamental limit may be designed, and how much improvement over the best existing coronagraph design is still possible. Both the analytical model and numerical simulations of existing designs also show that this theoretical limit rapidly degrades as the source size is increased: the ``highest performance'' coronagraphs, those with the highest throughput and smallest Inner Working Angle (IWA), are the most sensitive to stellar angular diameter. This unfortunately rules out the possibility of using a small IWA (lambda/d) coronagraph for a terrestrial planet imaging mission. Finally, a detailed numerical simulation which accurately accounts for stellar angular size, zodiacal and exozodiacal light is used to quantify the efficiency of coronagraph designs for direct imaging of extrasolar terrestrial planets in a possible real observing program. We find that in the photon noise limited regime, a 4m telescope with a theoretically optimal coronagraph is able to detect Earth-like planets around 50 stars with 1hr exposure time per target (assuming 25% throughput and exozodi levels similar to our solar system). We also show that at least 2 existing coronagraph design can approach this level of performance in the ideal monochromatic case considered in this study.
  • Properly apodized pupils can deliver point spread functions (PSFs) free of Airy rings, and are suitable for high dynamical range imaging of extrasolar terrestrial planets (ETPs). To reach this goal, classical pupil apodization (CPA) unfortunately requires most of the light gathered by the telescope to be absorbed, resulting in poor throughput and low angular resolution. Phase-induced amplitude apodization (PIAA) of the telescope pupil (Guyon 2003) combines the advantages of classical pupil apodization (particularly low sensitivity to low order aberrations) with full throughput, no loss of angular resolution and little chromaticity, which makes it, theoretically, an extremely attractive coronagraph for direct imaging of ETPs. The two most challenging aspects of this technique are (1) the difficulty to polish the required optics shapes and (2) diffraction propagation effects which, because of their chromaticity, can decrease the spectral bandwidth of the coronagraph. We show that a properly designed hybrid system combining classical apodization with the PIAA technique can solve both problems simultaneously. For such a system, the optics shapes can be well within today's optics manufacturing capabilities, and the $10^{-10}$ PSF contrast at $\approx 1.5 \lambda/D$ required for efficient imaging of ETPs can be maintained over the whole visible spectrum. This updated design of the PIAA coronagraph maintains the high performance of the earlier design, since only a small part of the light is lost in the classical apodizer(s).
  • We report on K-band interferometric observations of the bright, rapidly rotating star Regulus (type B7 V) made with the CHARA Array on Mount Wilson, California. Through a combination of interferometric and spectroscopic measurements, we have determined for Regulus the equatorial and polar diameters and temperatures, the rotational velocity and period, the inclination and position angle of the spin axis, and the gravity darkening coefficient. These first results from the CHARA Array provide the first interferometric measurement of gravity darkening in a rapidly rotating star and represent the first detection of gravity darkening in a star that is not a member of an eclipsing binary system.
  • We report the observations in the K band of the red supergiant star alpha Orionis and of the bright giant star alpha Herculis with the FLUOR beamcombiner at the IOTA interferometer. The high quality of the data allows us to estimate limb-darkening and derive precise diameters in the K band which combined with bolometric fluxes yield effective temperatures. In the case of Betelgeuse, data collected at high spatial frequency although sparse are compatible with circular symmetry and there is no clear evidence for departure from circular symmetry. We have combined the K band data with interferometric measurements in the L band and at 11.15 micron. The full set of data can be explained if a 2055 K layer with optical depths $\tau_{K}=0.060\pm0.003$, $\tau_{L}=0.026\pm0.002$ and $\tau_{11.15\mu m}=2.33\pm0.23$ is added 0.33 $R_{\star}$ above the photosphere providing a first consistent view of the star in this range of wavelengths. This layer provides a consistent explanation for at least three otherwise puzzling observations: the wavelength variation of apparent diameter, the dramatic difference in limb darkening between the two supergiant stars, and the previously noted reduced effective temperature of supergiants with respect to giants of the same spectral type. Each of these may be simply understood as an artifact due to not accounting for the presence of the upper layer in the data analysis. This consistent picture can be considered strong support for the presence of a sphere of warm water vapor, proposed by Tsuji (2000) when interpreting the spectra of strong molecular lines.
  • ESPI has been proposed for direct imaging and spectral analysis of giant planets orbiting solar-type stars. ESPI extends the concept suggested by Nisenson and Papaliolios (2001) for a square aperture apodized telescope that has sufficient dynamic range to directly detect exo-planets. With a 1.5 M square mirror, ESPI can deliver high dynamic range imagery as close as 0.3 arcseconds to bright sources, permitting a sensitive search for exoplanets around nearby stars and a study of their characteristics in reflected light.