• Bidimensionality Theory was introduced by [E.D. Demaine, F.V. Fomin, M.Hajiaghayi, and D.M. Thilikos. Subexponential parameterized algorithms on graphs of bounded genus and H-minor-free graphs, J. ACM, 52 (2005), pp.866--893] as a tool to obtain sub-exponential time parameterized algorithms on H-minor-free graphs. In [E.D. Demaine and M.Hajiaghayi, Bidimensionality: new connections between FPT algorithms and PTASs, in Proceedings of the 16th Annual ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms (SODA), SIAM, 2005, pp.590--601] this theory was extended in order to obtain polynomial time approximation schemes (PTASs) for bidimensional problems. In this work, we establish a third meta-algorithmic direction for bidimensionality theory by relating it to the existence of linear kernels for parameterized problems. In particular, we prove that every minor (respectively contraction) bidimensional problem that satisfies a separation property and is expressible in Countable Monadic Second Order Logic (CMSO), admits a linear kernel for classes of graphs that exclude a fixed graph (respectively an apex graph) H as a minor. Our results imply that a multitude of bidimensional problems g graph classes. For most of these problems no polynomial kernels on H-minor-free graphs were known prior to our work.
  • In the classic Integer Programming (IP) problem, the objective is to decide whether, for a given $m \times n$ matrix $A$ and an $m$-vector $b=(b_1,\dots, b_m)$, there is a non-negative integer $n$-vector $x$ such that $Ax=b$. Solving (IP) is an important step in numerous algorithms and it is important to obtain an understanding of the precise complexity of this problem as a function of natural parameters of the input. The classic pseudo-polynomial time algorithm of Papadimitriou [J. ACM 1981] for instances of (IP) with a constant number of constraints was only recently improved upon by Eisenbrand and Weismantel [SODA 2018] and Jansen and Rohwedder [ArXiv 2018]. We continue this line of work and show that under the Exponential Time Hypothesis (ETH), the algorithm of Jansen and Rohwedder is nearly optimal. We also show that when the matrix $A$ is assumed to be non-negative, a component of Papadimitriou's original algorithm is already nearly optimal under ETH. This motivates us to pick up the line of research initiated by Cunningham and Geelen [IPCO 2007] who studied the complexity of solving (IP) with non-negative matrices in which the number of constraints may be unbounded, but the branch-width of the column-matroid corresponding to the constraint matrix is a constant. We prove a lower bound on the complexity of solving (IP) for such instances and obtain optimal results with respect to a closely related parameter, path-width. Specifically, we prove matching upper and lower bounds for (IP) when the path-width of the corresponding column-matroid is a constant.
  • An input to the Popular Matching problem, in the roommates setting, consists of a graph $G$ and each vertex ranks its neighbors in strict order, known as its preference. In the Popular Matching problem the objective is to test whether there exists a matching $M^\star$ such that there is no matching $M$ where more people are happier with $M$ than with $M^\star$. In this paper we settle the computational complexity of the Popular Matching problem in the roommates setting by showing that the problem is NP-complete. Thus, we resolve an open question that has been repeatedly, explicitly asked over the last decade.
  • Given a directed graph $D$ on $n$ vertices and a positive integer $k$, the Arc-Disjoint Cycle Packing problem is to determine whether $D$ has $k$ arc-disjoint cycles. This problem is known to be W[1]-hard in general directed graphs. In this paper, we initiate a systematic study on the parameterized complexity of the problem restricted to tournaments. We show that the problem is fixed-parameter tractable and admits a polynomial kernel when parameterized by the solution size $k$. In particular, we show that it can be solved in $2^{\mathcal{O}(k \log k)} n^{\mathcal{O}(1)}$ time and has a kernel with $\mathcal{O}(k)$ vertices. The primary ingredient in both these results is a min-max theorem that states that every tournament either contains $k$ arc-disjoint triangles or has a feedback arc set of size at most $6k$. Our belief is that this combinatorial result is of independent interest and could be useful in other problems related to cycles in tournaments.
  • Given a Counting Monadic Second Order (CMSO) sentence $\psi$, the CMSO$[\psi]$ problem is defined as follows. The input to CMSO$[\psi]$ is a graph $G$, and the objective is to determine whether $G\models \psi$. Our main theorem states that for every CMSO sentence $\psi$, if CMSO$[\psi]$ is solvable in polynomial time on "globally highly connected graphs", then CMSO$[\psi]$ is solvable in polynomial time (on general graphs). We demonstrate the utility of our theorem in the design of parameterized algorithms. Specifically we show that technical problem-specific ingredients of a powerful method for designing parameterized algorithms, recursive understanding, can be replaced by a black-box invocation of our main theorem. We also show that our theorem can be easily deployed to show fixed parameterized tractability of a wide range of problems, where the input is a graph $G$ and the task is to find a connected induced subgraph of $G$ such that "few" vertices in this subgraph have neighbors outside the subgraph, and additionally the subgraph has a CMSO-definable property.
  • The family of judicious partitioning problems, introduced by Bollob\'as and Scott to the field of extremal combinatorics, has been extensively studied from a structural point of view for over two decades. This rich realm of problems aims to counterbalance the objectives of classical partitioning problems such as Min Cut, Min Bisection and Max Cut. While these classical problems focus solely on the minimization/maximization of the number of edges crossing the cut, judicious (bi)partitioning problems ask the natural question of the minimization/maximization of the number of edges lying in the (two) sides of the cut. In particular, Judicious Bipartition (JB) seeks a bipartition that is "judicious" in the sense that neither side is burdened by too many edges, and Balanced JB also requires that the sizes of the sides themselves are "balanced" in the sense that neither of them is too large. Both of these problems were defined in the work by Bollob\'as and Scott, and have received notable scientific attention since then. In this paper, we shed light on the study of judicious partitioning problems from the viewpoint of algorithm design. Specifically, we prove that BJB is FPT (which also proves that JB is FPT).
  • Seymour's decomposition theorem for regular matroids is a fundamental result with a number of combinatorial and algorithmic applications. In this work we demonstrate how this theorem can be used in the design of parameterized algorithms on regular matroids. We consider the problem of covering a set of vectors of a given finite dimensional linear space (vector space) by a subspace generated by a set of vectors of minimum size. Specifically, in the Space Cover problem, we are given a matrix M and a subset of its columns T; the task is to find a minimum set F of columns of M disjoint with T such that that the linear span of F contains all vectors of T. For graphic matroids this problem is essentially Stainer Forest and for cographic matroids this is a generalization of Multiway Cut. Our main result is the algorithm with running time 2^{O(k)}||M|| ^{O(1)} solving Space Cover in the case when M is a totally unimodular matrix over rationals, where k is the size of F. In other words, we show that on regular matroids the problem is fixed-parameter tractable parameterized by the rank of the covering subspace.
  • For a family of graphs $\cal F$, the $\mathcal{F}$-Contraction problem takes as an input a graph $G$ and an integer $k$, and the goal is to decide if there exists $S \subseteq E(G)$ of size at most $k$ such that $G/S$ belongs to $\cal F$. Here, $G/S$ is the graph obtained from $G$ by contracting all the edges in $S$. Heggernes et al.~[Algorithmica (2014)] were the first to study edge contraction problems in the realm of Parameterized Complexity. They studied $\cal F$-Contraction when $\cal F$ is a simple family of graphs such as trees and paths. In this paper, we study the $\mathcal{F}$-Contraction problem, where $\cal F$ generalizes the family of trees. In particular, we define this generalization in a "parameterized way". Let $\mathbb{T}_\ell$ be the family of graphs such that each graph in $\mathbb{T}_\ell$ can be made into a tree by deleting at most $\ell$ edges. Thus, the problem we study is $\mathbb{T}_\ell$-Contraction. We design an FPT algorithm for $\mathbb{T}_\ell$-Contraction running in time $\mathcal{O}((2\sqrt(\ell))^{\mathcal{O}(k + \ell)} \cdot n^{\mathcal{O}(1)})$. Furthermore, we show that the problem does not admit a polynomial kernel when parameterized by $k$. Inspired by the negative result for the kernelization, we design a lossy kernel for $\mathbb{T}_\ell$-Contraction of size $ \mathcal{O}([k(k + 2\ell)] ^{(\lceil {\frac{\alpha}{\alpha-1}\rceil + 1)}})$.
  • The Balanced Stable Marriage problem is a central optimization version of the classic Stable Marriage problem. Here, the output cannot be an arbitrary stable matching, but one that balances between the dissatisfaction of the two parties, men and women. We study Balanced Stable Marriage from the viewpoint of Parameterized Complexity. Our "above guarantee parameterizations" are arguably the most natural parameterizations of the problem at hand. Indeed, our parameterizations precisely fit the scenario where there exists a stable marriage that both parties would accept, that is, where the satisfaction of each party is "close" to the best it can hope for. Furthermore, our parameterizations accurately draw the line between tractability and intractability with respect to the target value.
  • Stable Marriage is a fundamental problem to both computer science and economics. Four well-known NP-hard optimization versions of this problem are the Sex-Equal Stable Marriage (SESM), Balanced Stable Marriage (BSM), max-Stable Marriage with Ties (max-SMT) and min-Stable Marriage with Ties (min-SMT) problems. In this paper, we analyze these problems from the viewpoint of Parameterized Complexity. We conduct the first study of these problems with respect to the parameter treewidth. First, we study the treewidth $\mathtt{tw}$ of the primal graph. We establish that all four problems are W[1]-hard. In particular, while it is easy to show that all four problems admit algorithms that run in time $n^{O(\mathtt{tw})}$, we prove that all of these algorithms are likely to be essentially optimal. Next, we study the treewidth $\mathtt{tw}$ of the rotation digraph. In this context, the max-SMT and min-SMT are not defined. For both SESM and BSM, we design (non-trivial) algorithms that run in time $2^{\mathtt{tw}}n^{O(1)}$. Then, for both SESM and BSM, we also prove that unless SETH is false, algorithms that run in time $(2-\epsilon)^{\mathtt{tw}}n^{O(1)}$ do not exist for any fixed $\epsilon>0$. We thus present a comprehensive, complete picture of the behavior of central optimization versions of Stable Marriage with respect to treewidth.
  • For a family of graphs $\cal F$, the canonical Weighted $\cal F$ Vertex Deletion problem is defined as follows: given an $n$-vertex undirected graph $G$ and a weight function $w: V(G)\rightarrow\mathbb{R}$, find a minimum weight subset $S\subseteq V(G)$ such that $G-S$ belongs to $\cal F$. We devise a recursive scheme to obtain $O(\log^{O(1)}n)$-approximation algorithms for such problems, building upon the classic technique of finding balanced separators in a graph. Roughly speaking, our scheme applies to problems where an optimum solution $S$, together with a well-structured set $X$, form a balanced separator of $G$. We obtain the first $O(\log^{O(1)}n)$-approximation algorithms for the following problems. * We give an $O(\log^2n)$-factor approximation algorithm for Weighted Chordal Vertex Deletion (WCVD), the vertex deletion problem to the family of chordal graphs. On the way, we also obtain a constant factor approximation algorithm for Multicut on chordal graphs. * We give an $O(\log^3n)$-factor approximation algorithm for Weighted Distance Hereditary Vertex Deletion (WDHVD). This is the vertex deletion problem to the family of distance hereditary graphs, or equivalently, the family of graphs of rankwidth 1. Our methods also allow us to obtain in a clean fashion a $O(\log^{1.5}n)$-approximation algorithm for the Weighted $\cal F$ Vertex Deletion problem when $\cal F$ is a minor closed family excluding at least one planar graph. For the unweighted version of the problem constant factor approximation algorithms are were known~[Fomin et al., FOCS~2012], while for the weighted version considered here an $O(\log n \log\log n)$-approximation algorithm follows from~[Bansal et al., SODA~2017]. We believe that our recursive scheme can be applied to obtain $O(\log^{O(1)}n)$-approximation algorithms for many other problems as well.
  • Given a graph $G$ and a parameter $k$, the Chordal Vertex Deletion (CVD) problem asks whether there exists a subset $U\subseteq V(G)$ of size at most $k$ that hits all induced cycles of size at least 4. The existence of a polynomial kernel for CVD was a well-known open problem in the field of Parameterized Complexity. Recently, Jansen and Pilipczuk resolved this question affirmatively by designing a polynomial kernel for CVD of size $O(k^{161}\log^{58}k)$, and asked whether one can design a kernel of size $O(k^{10})$. While we do not completely resolve this question, we design a significantly smaller kernel of size $O(k^{12}\log^{10}k)$, inspired by the $O(k^2)$-size kernel for Feedback Vertex Set. Furthermore, we introduce the notion of the independence degree of a vertex, which is our main conceptual contribution.
  • The Cycle Packing problem asks whether a given undirected graph $G=(V,E)$ contains $k$ vertex-disjoint cycles. Since the publication of the classic Erd\H{o}s-P\'osa theorem in 1965, this problem received significant scientific attention in the fields of Graph Theory and Algorithm Design. In particular, this problem is one of the first problems studied in the framework of Parameterized Complexity. The non-uniform fixed-parameter tractability of Cycle Packing follows from the Robertson-Seymour theorem, a fact already observed by Fellows and Langston in the 1980s. In 1994, Bodlaender showed that Cycle Packing can be solved in time $2^{\mathcal{O}(k^2)}\cdot |V|$ using exponential space. In case a solution exists, Bodlaender's algorithm also outputs a solution (in the same time). It has later become common knowledge that Cycle Packing admits a $2^{\mathcal{O}(k\log^2k)}\cdot |V|$-time (deterministic) algorithm using exponential space, which is a consequence of the Erd\H{o}s-P\'osa theorem. Nowadays, the design of this algorithm is given as an exercise in textbooks on Parameterized Complexity. Yet, no algorithm that runs in time $2^{o(k\log^2k)}\cdot |V|^{\mathcal{O}(1)}$, beating the bound $2^{\mathcal{O}(k\log^2k)}\cdot |V|^{\mathcal{O}(1)}$, has been found. In light of this, it seems natural to ask whether the $2^{\mathcal{O}(k\log^2k)}\cdot |V|^{\mathcal{O}(1)}$ bound is essentially optimal. In this paper, we answer this question negatively by developing a $2^{\mathcal{O}(\frac{k\log^2k}{\log\log k})}\cdot |V|$-time (deterministic) algorithm for Cycle Packing. In case a solution exists, our algorithm also outputs a solution (in the same time). Moreover, apart from beating the bound $2^{\mathcal{O}(k\log^2k)}\cdot |V|^{\mathcal{O}(1)}$, our algorithm runs in time linear in $|V|$, and its space complexity is polynomial in the input size.
  • The question of the existence of a polynomial kernelization of the Vertex Cover Above LP problem has been a longstanding, notorious open problem in Parameterized Complexity. Five years ago, the breakthrough work by Kratsch and Wahlstrom on representative sets has finally answered this question in the affirmative [FOCS 2012]. In this paper, we present an alternative, algebraic compression of the Vertex Cover Above LP problem into the Rank Vertex Cover problem. Here, the input consists of a graph G, a parameter k, and a bijection between V (G) and the set of columns of a representation of a matriod M, and the objective is to find a vertex cover whose rank is upper bounded by k.
  • We present two new combinatorial tools for the design of parameterized algorithms. The first is a simple linear time randomized algorithm that given as input a $d$-degenerate graph $G$ and an integer $k$, outputs an independent set $Y$, such that for every independent set $X$ in $G$ of size at most $k$, the probability that $X$ is a subset of $Y$ is at least $\left({(d+1)k \choose k} \cdot k(d+1)\right)^{-1}$.The second is a new (deterministic) polynomial time graph sparsification procedure that given a graph $G$, a set $T = \{\{s_1, t_1\}, \{s_2, t_2\}, \ldots, \{s_\ell, t_\ell\}\}$ of terminal pairs and an integer $k$, returns an induced subgraph $G^\star$ of $G$ that maintains all the inclusion minimal multicuts of $G$ of size at most $k$, and does not contain any $(k+2)$-vertex connected set of size $2^{{\cal O}(k)}$. In particular, $G^\star$ excludes a clique of size $2^{{\cal O}(k)}$ as a topological minor. Put together, our new tools yield new randomized fixed parameter tractable (FPT) algorithms for Stable $s$-$t$ Separator, Stable Odd Cycle Transversal and Stable Multicut on general graphs, and for Stable Directed Feedback Vertex Set on $d$-degenerate graphs, resolving two problems left open by Marx et al. [ACM Transactions on Algorithms, 2013]. All of our algorithms can be derandomized at the cost of a small overhead in the running time.
  • We give algorithms with running time $2^{O({\sqrt{k}\log{k}})} \cdot n^{O(1)}$ for the following problems. Given an $n$-vertex unit disk graph $G$ and an integer $k$, decide whether $G$ contains (1) a path on exactly/at least $k$ vertices, (2) a cycle on exactly $k$ vertices, (3) a cycle on at least $k$ vertices, (4) a feedback vertex set of size at most $k$, and (5) a set of $k$ pairwise vertex-disjoint cycles. For the first three problems, no subexponential time parameterized algorithms were previously known. For the remaining two problems, our algorithms significantly outperform the previously best known parameterized algorithms that run in time $2^{O(k^{0.75}\log{k})} \cdot n^{O(1)}$. Our algorithms are based on a new kind of tree decompositions of unit disk graphs where the separators can have size up to $k^{O(1)}$ and there exists a solution that crosses every separator at most $O(\sqrt{k})$ times. The running times of our algorithms are optimal up to the $\log{k}$ factor in the exponent, assuming the Exponential Time Hypothesis.
  • A directed odd cycle transversal of a directed graph (digraph) $D$ is a vertex set $S$ that intersects every odd directed cycle of $D$. In the Directed Odd Cycle Transversal (DOCT) problem, the input consists of a digraph $D$ and an integer $k$. The objective is to determine whether there exists a directed odd cycle transversal of $D$ of size at most $k$. In this paper, we settle the parameterized complexity of DOCT when parameterized by the solution size $k$ by showing that DOCT does not admit an algorithm with running time $f(k)n^{O(1)}$ unless FPT = W[1]. On the positive side, we give a factor $2$ fixed parameter tractable (FPT) approximation algorithm for the problem. More precisely, our algorithm takes as input $D$ and $k$, runs in time $2^{O(k^2)}n^{O(1)}$, and either concludes that $D$ does not have a directed odd cycle transversal of size at most $k$, or produces a solution of size at most $2k$. Finally, we provide evidence that there exists $\epsilon > 0$ such that DOCT does not admit a factor $(1+\epsilon)$ FPT-approximation algorithm.
  • A Group Labeled Graph is a pair $(G,\Lambda)$ where $G$ is an oriented graph and $\Lambda$ is a mapping from the arcs of $G$ to elements of a group. A (not necessarily directed) cycle $C$ is called non-null if for any cyclic ordering of the arcs in $C$, the group element obtained by `adding' the labels on forward arcs and `subtracting' the labels on reverse arcs is not the identity element of the group. Non-null cycles in group labeled graphs generalize several well-known graph structures, including odd cycles. In this paper, we prove that non-null cycles on Group Labeled Graphs have the half-integral Erd\"os-P\'osa property. That is, there is a function $f:{\mathbb N}\to {\mathbb N}$ such that for any $k\in {\mathbb N}$, any group labeled graph $(G,\Lambda)$ has a set of $k$ non-null cycles such that each vertex of $G$ appears in at most two of these cycles or there is a set of at most $f(k)$ vertices that intersects every non-null cycle. Since it is known that non-null cycles do not have the integeral Erd\"os-P\'osa property in general, a half-integral Erd\"os-P\'osa result is the best one could hope for.
  • In the Survivable Network Design Problem (SNDP), the input is an edge-weighted (di)graph $G$ and an integer $r_{uv}$ for every pair of vertices $u,v\in V(G)$. The objective is to construct a subgraph $H$ of minimum weight which contains $r_{uv}$ edge-disjoint (or node-disjoint) $u$-$v$ paths. This is a fundamental problem in combinatorial optimization that captures numerous well-studied problems in graph theory and graph algorithms. In this paper, we consider the version of the problem where we are given a $\lambda$-edge connected (di)graph $G$ with a non-negative weight function $w$ on the edges and an integer $k$, and the objective is to find a minimum weight spanning subgraph $H$ that is also $\lambda$-edge connected, and has at least $k$ fewer edges than $G$. In other words, we are asked to compute a maximum weight subset of edges, of cardinality up to $k$, which may be safely deleted from $G$. Motivated by this question, we investigate the connectivity properties of $\lambda$-edge connected (di)graphs and obtain algorithmically significant structural results. We demonstrate the importance of our structural results by presenting an algorithm running in time $2^{O(k \log k)} |V(G)|^{O(1)}$ for $\lambda$-ECS, thus proving its fixed-parameter tractability. We follow up on this result and obtain the {\em first polynomial compression} for $\lambda$-ECS on unweighted graphs. As a consequence, we also obtain the first fixed parameter tractable algorithm, and a polynomial kernel for a parameterized version of the classic Mininum Equivalent Graph problem. We believe that our structural results are of independent interest and will play a crucial role in the design of algorithms for connectivity-constrained problems in general and the SNDP problem in particular.
  • In this paper we consider Simultaneous Feedback Edge Set (Sim-FES) problem. In this problem, the input is an $n$-vertex graph $G$, an integer $k$ and a coloring function ${\sf col}: E(G) \rightarrow 2^{[\alpha]}$ and the objective is to check whether there is an edge subset $S$ of cardinality at most $k$ in $G$ such that for all $i \in [\alpha]$, $G_i - S$ is acyclic. Here, $G_i=(V(G), \{e\in E(G) \mid i \in {\sf col}(e)\})$ and $[\alpha]=\{1,\ldots,\alpha\}$. When $\alpha =1$, the problem is polynomial time solvable. We show that for $\alpha =3$ Sim-FES is NP-hard by giving a reduction from Vertex Cover on cubic graphs. The same reduction shows that the problem does not admit an algorithm of running time $O(2^{o(k)}n^{O(1)})$ unless ETH fails. This hardness result is complimented by an FPT algorithm for Sim-FES running in time $O(2^{\omega k\alpha+\alpha \log k} n^{O(1)})$, where $\omega$ is the exponent in the running time of matrix multiplication. The same algorithm gives a polynomial time algorithm for the case when $\alpha =2$. We also give a kernel for Sim-FES with $(k\alpha)^{O(\alpha)}$ vertices. Finally, we consider the problem Maximum Simultaneous Acyclic Subgraph. Here, the input is a graph $G$, an integer $q$ and, a coloring function ${\sf col}: E(G) \rightarrow 2^{[\alpha]}$. The question is whether there is a edge subset $F$ of cardinality at least $q$ in $G$ such that for all $i\in [\alpha]$, $G[F_i]$ is acyclic. Here, $F_i=\{e \in F \mid i \in \textsf{col}(e)\}$. We give an FPT algorithm for running in time $O(2^{\omega q \alpha}n^{O(1)})$.
  • In this paper we propose a new framework for analyzing the performance of preprocessing algorithms. Our framework builds on the notion of kernelization from parameterized complexity. However, as opposed to the original notion of kernelization, our definitions combine well with approximation algorithms and heuristics. The key new definition is that of a polynomial size $\alpha$-approximate kernel. Loosely speaking, a polynomial size $\alpha$-approximate kernel is a polynomial time pre-processing algorithm that takes as input an instance $(I,k)$ to a parameterized problem, and outputs another instance $(I',k')$ to the same problem, such that $|I'|+k' \leq k^{O(1)}$. Additionally, for every $c \geq 1$, a $c$-approximate solution $s'$ to the pre-processed instance $(I',k')$ can be turned in polynomial time into a $(c \cdot \alpha)$-approximate solution $s$ to the original instance $(I,k)$. Our main technical contribution are $\alpha$-approximate kernels of polynomial size for three problems, namely Connected Vertex Cover, Disjoint Cycle Packing and Disjoint Factors. These problems are known not to admit any polynomial size kernels unless $NP \subseteq coNP/poly$. Our approximate kernels simultaneously beat both the lower bounds on the (normal) kernel size, and the hardness of approximation lower bounds for all three problems. On the negative side we prove that Longest Path parameterized by the length of the path and Set Cover parameterized by the universe size do not admit even an $\alpha$-approximate kernel of polynomial size, for any $\alpha \geq 1$, unless $NP \subseteq coNP/poly$. In order to prove this lower bound we need to combine in a non-trivial way the techniques used for showing kernelization lower bounds with the methods for showing hardness of approximation
  • A vertex subset $S$ in a graph $G$ is a dominating set if every vertex not contained in $S$ has a neighbor in $S$. A dominating set $S$ is a connected dominating set if the subgraph $G[S]$ induced by $S$ is connected. A connected dominating set $S$ is a minimal connected dominating set if no proper subset of $S$ is also a connected dominating set. We prove that there exists a constant $\varepsilon > 10^{-50}$ such that every graph $G$ on $n$ vertices has at most $O(2^{(1-\varepsilon)n})$ minimal connected dominating sets. For the same $\varepsilon$ we also give an algorithm with running time $2^{(1-\varepsilon)n}\cdot n^{O(1)}$ to enumerate all minimal connected dominating sets in an input graph $G$.
  • In the Directed Feedback Vertex Set (DFVS) problem, the input is a directed graph $D$ on $n$ vertices and $m$ edges, and an integer $k$. The objective is to determine whether there exists a set of at most $k$ vertices intersecting every directed cycle of $D$. Whether or not DFVS admits a fixed parameter tractable (FPT) algorithm was considered the most important open problem in parameterized complexity until Chen, Liu, Lu, O'Sullivan and Razgon [JACM 2008] answered the question in the affirmative. They gave an algorithm for the problem with running time $O(k!4^kk^4nm)$. Since then, no faster algorithm for the problem has been found. In this paper, we give an algorithm for DFVS with running time $O(k!4^kk^5(n+m))$. Our algorithm is the first algorithm for DFVS with linear dependence on input size. Furthermore, the asymptotic dependence of the running time of our algorithm on the parameter $k$ matches up to a factor $k$ the algorithm of Chen, Liu, Lu, O'Sullivan and Razgon. On the way to designing our algorithm for DFVS, we give a general methodology to shave off a factor of $n$ from iterative-compression based algorithms for a few other well-studied covering problems in parameterized complexity. We demonstrate the applicability of this technique by speeding up by a factor of $n$, the current best FPT algorithms for Multicut [STOC 2011, SICOMP 2014] and Directed Subset Feedback Vertex Set [ICALP 2012, TALG 2014].
  • We consider the fundamental Matroid Theory problem of finding a circuit in a matroid spanning a set T of given terminal elements. For graphic matroids this corresponds to the problem of finding a simple cycle passing through a set of given terminal edges in a graph. The algorithmic study of the problem on regular matroids, a superclass of graphic matroids, was initiated by Gaven\v{c}iak, Kr\'al', and Oum [ICALP'12], who proved that the case of the problem with |T|=2 is fixed-parameter tractable (FPT) when parameterized by the length of the circuit. We extend the result of Gaven\v{c}iak, Kr\'al', and Oum by showing that for regular matroids - the Minimum Spanning Circuit problem, deciding whether there is a circuit with at most \ell elements containing T, is FPT parameterized by k=\ell-|T|; - the Spanning Circuit problem, deciding whether there is a circuit containing T, is FPT parameterized by |T|. We note that extending our algorithmic findings to binary matroids, a superclass of regular matroids, is highly unlikely: Minimum Spanning Circuit parameterized by \ell is W[1]-hard on binary matroids even when |T|=1. We also show a limit to how far our results can be strengthened by considering a smaller parameter. More precisely, we prove that Minimum Spanning Circuit parameterized by |T| is W[1]-hard even on cographic matroids, a proper subclass of regular matroids.
  • The optimization version of the Unique Label Cover problem is at the heart of the Unique Games Conjecture which has played an important role in the proof of several tight inapproximability results. In recent years, this problem has been also studied extensively from the point of view of parameterized complexity. Cygan et al. [FOCS 2012] proved that this problem is fixed-parameter tractable (FPT) and Wahlstr\"om [SODA 2014] gave an FPT algorithm with an improved parameter dependence. Subsequently, Iwata, Wahlstr\"om and Yoshida [2014] proved that the edge version of Unique Label Cover can be solved in linear FPT-time. That is, there is an FPT algorithm whose dependence on the input-size is linear. However, such an algorithm for the node version of the problem was left as an open problem. In this paper, we resolve this question by presenting the first linear-time FPT algorithm for Node Unique Label Cover.