• We study dust attenuation curves of 230,000 individual galaxies in the local universe, ranging from quiescent to intensely star-forming systems, using GALEX, SDSS, and WISE photometry calibrated on Herschel-ATLAS. We use a new method of constraining SED fits with infrared luminosity (SED+LIR fitting), and parameterized attenuation curves determined with the CIGALE SED fitting code. Attenuation curve slopes and UV bump strengths are reasonably well constrained independently from one another. We find that $A_{\lambda}/A_V$ attenuation curves exhibit a very wide range of slopes that are on average as steep as the SMC curve slope. The slope is a strong function of optical opacity. Opaque galaxies have shallower curves - in agreement with recent radiate transfer models. The dependence of slopes on the opacity produces an apparent dependence on stellar mass: more massive galaxies having shallower slopes. Attenuation curves exhibit a wide range of UV bump amplitudes, from none to MW-like; with an average strength 1/3 of the MW bump. Notably, local analogs of high-redshift galaxies have an average curve that is somewhat steeper than the SMC curve, with a modest UV bump that can be to first order ignored, as its effect on the near-UV magnitude is 0.1 mag. Neither the slopes nor the strengths of the UV bump depend on gas-phase metallicity. Functional forms for attenuation laws are presented for normal star-forming galaxies, high-z analogs and quiescent galaxies. We release the catalog of associated SFRs and stellar masses (GSWLC-2).
  • The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will enable revolutionary studies of galaxies, dark matter, and black holes over cosmic time. The LSST Galaxies Science Collaboration has identified a host of preparatory research tasks required to leverage fully the LSST dataset for extragalactic science beyond the study of dark energy. This Galaxies Science Roadmap provides a brief introduction to critical extragalactic science to be conducted ahead of LSST operations, and a detailed list of preparatory science tasks including the motivation, activities, and deliverables associated with each. The Galaxies Science Roadmap will serve as a guiding document for researchers interested in conducting extragalactic science in anticipation of the forthcoming LSST era.
  • In this paper, we present GALEX-SDSS-WISE Legacy Catalog (GSWLC), a catalog of physical properties (stellar masses, dust attenuations and star formation rates (SFRs)) of ~700,000 galaxies with SDSS redshifts below 0.3. GSWLC contains galaxies within the GALEX footprint, regardless of a UV detection, covering 90% of SDSS. The physical properties were obtained from UV/optical SED fitting following Bayesian methodology of Salim et al. (2007), with improvements such as blending corrections for low-resolution UV photometry, flexible dust attenuation laws, and emission line corrections. GSWLC includes mid-IR SFRs derived from IR templates based upon 22 micron WISE observations. These estimates are independent of UV/optical SED fitting, in order to separate possible systematics. The paper argues that the comparison of specific SFRs (SSFRs) is more informative and physically motivated than the comparison of SFRs. SSFRs resulting from the UV/optical SED fitting are compared to the mid-IR SSFRs, and to SSFRs from three published catalogs. For "main sequence" galaxies with no AGN contribution all SSFRs are in very good agreement (within 0.1 dex on average). In particular, the widely-used aperture-corrected SFRs from MPA/JHU catalog show no systematic offsets, in contrast to some integral-field spectroscopy results. For galaxies below the main sequence (log SSFR<-11), mid-IR (S)SFRs based on fixed luminosity-SFR conversion are severely biased (up to 2 dex) because the dust is primarily heated by old stars. Furthermore, mid-IR (S)SFRs are overestimated by up to 0.6 dex for galaxies with AGN, presumably due to non-stellar dust heating. UV/optical (S)SFRs are thus preferred to IR-based (S)SFRs for quenched galaxies and those which host AGN.
  • The feedback from radio-loud active galactic nuclei (R-AGN) may help maintain low star formation (SF) rates in their early-type hosts, but the observational evidence for this mechanism has been inconclusive. We study systematic differences of aggregate spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of various subsets of $\sim$4000 low-redshift R-AGN from Best & Heckman (2012) with respect to (currently) inactive control samples selected to have matching redshift, stellar mass, population age, axis ratio, and environment. Aggregate SEDs, ranging from the ultraviolet (UV) through mid-infrared (mid-IR, 22 $\mu$m), were constructed using a Bayesian method that eliminates biases from non-detections in GALEX and WISE. We study rare high-excitation sources separately from low-excitation ones, which we split by environment and host properties. We find that both the UV and mid-IR emission of non-cluster R-AGNs (80% of sample) are suppressed by $\sim$0.2 dex relative to that of the control group, especially for moderately massive galaxies (log $M_* \lesssim$ 11). The difference disappears for high-mass R-AGN and for R-AGN in clusters, where other, non-AGN quenching/maintenance mechanisms may dominate, or where the suppression of SF due to AGN may persist between active phases of the central engine, perhaps because of the presence of a hot gaseous halo storing AGN energy. High-excitation (high accretion rate) sources, which make up 2% of the R-AGN sample, also show no evidence of SF suppression (their UV is the same as in controls), but they exhibit a strong mid-IR excess due to AGN dust heating.
  • Recent studies have shown that the local mass-metallicity (M-Z) relation depends on the specific star formation rate (SSFR). Whether such a dependence exists at higher redshifts, and whether the resulting M-Z-SFR relation is redshift invariant, is debated. We re-examine these issues by applying the non-parametric techniques of Salim et al. (2014) to ~130 $z\sim2.3$ galaxies with N2 and O3 measurements from KBSS (Steidel et al. 2014). We find that the KBSS M-Z relation depends on SSFR at intermediate masses, where such dependence exists locally. KBSS and SDSS galaxies of the same mass and SSFR ("local analogs") are similarly offset in the BPT diagram relative to the bulk of local star-forming galaxies, and thus we posit that metallicities can be compared self-consistently at different redshifts as long as the masses and SSFRs of the galaxies are similar. We find that the M-Z-SFR relation of $z\sim2$ galaxies is consistent with the local one at $\log M_*<10$, but is offset up to -0.25 dex at higher masses, so it is altogether not redshift invariant. This high-mass offset could arise from a bias that high-redshift spectroscopic surveys have against high-metallicity galaxies, but additional evidence disfavors this possibility. We identify three causes for the reported discrepancy between N2 and O3N2 metallicities at $z\sim2$: (1) a smaller offset that is also present for SDSS galaxies, which we remove with new N2 calibration, (2) a genuine offset due to differing ISM condition, which is also present in local analogs, (3) an additional offset due to unrecognized AGN contamination.
  • We use deep panchromatic datasets in the GOODS-N field, from GALEX to the deepest Herschel far-infrared and VLA radio continuum imaging, to explore, using mass-complete samples, the evolution of the star formation activity and dust attenuation of star-forming galaxies to z~4. Our main results can be summarized as follows: i) the slope of the SFR-M correlation is consistent with being constant, and equal to ~0.8 at least up to z~1.5, while its normalization keeps increasing with redshift; ii) for the first time here we are able to explore the FIR-radio correlation for a mass-selected sample of star-forming galaxies: the correlation does not evolve up to z~4; iii) we confirm that galaxy stellar mass is a robust proxy for UV dust attenuation in star-forming galaxies, with more massive galaxies being more dust attenuated, strikingly we find that this attenuation relation evolves very weakly with redshift, the amount of dust attenuation increasing by less than 0.3 magnitudes over the redshift range [0.5-4] for a fixed stellar mass, as opposed to a tenfold increase of star formation rate; iv) the correlation between dust attenuation and the UV spectral slope evolves in redshift, with the median UV spectral slope of star-forming galaxies becoming bluer with redshift. By z~3, typical UV slopes are inconsistent, given the measured dust attenuation, with the predictions of commonly used empirical laws. Finally, building on existing results, we show that gas reddening is marginally larger (by a factor of around 1.3) than stellar reddening at all redshifts probed, and also that the amount of dust attenuation at a fixed ISM metallicity increases with redshift. We speculate that our results support evolving ISM conditions of typical star-forming galaxies such that at z~1.5 Main Sequence galaxies have ISM conditions getting closer to those of local starbursts.
  • The "green valley" is a wide region separating the blue and the red peaks in the ultraviolet-optical color magnitude diagram, first revealed using GALEX UV photometry. The term was coined by Christopher Martin in 2005. Green valley highlights the discriminating power of UV to very low relative levels of ongoing star formation, to which the optical colors, including u-r, are insensitive. It corresponds to massive galaxies below the star-forming "main" sequence, and therefore represents a critical tool for the study of the quenching of star formation and its possible resurgence in otherwise quiescent galaxies. This article reviews the results pertaining to morphology, structure, environment, dust content and gas properties of green valley galaxies in the local universe. Their relationship to AGN is also discussed. Attention is given to biases emerging from defining the "green valley" using optical colors. We review various evolutionary scenarios and we present evidence for a new, quasi-static view of the green valley, in which the majority of galaxies currently in the green valley were only partially quenched in the distant past and now participate in a slow cosmic decline of star formation, which also drives down the activity on the main sequence, presumably as a result of the dwindling accretion/cooling onto galaxy disks.
  • It has been proposed that the mass-metallicity relation of galaxies exhibits a secondary dependence on star formation rate (SFR), and that the resulting M-Z-SFR relation may be redshift-invariant, i.e., "fundamental." However, conflicting results on the character of the SFR dependence, and whether it exists, have been reported. To gain insight into the origins of the conflicting results, we (a) devise a non-parametric, astrophysically motivated analysis framework based on the offset from the star-forming ("main") sequence at a given stellar mass (relative specific SFR), (b) apply this methodology and perform a comprehensive re-analysis of the local M-Z-SFR relation, based on SDSS, GALEX, and WISE data, and (c) study the impact of sample selection, and of using different metallicity and SFR indicators. We show that metallicity is anti-correlated with specific SFR regardless of the indicators used. We do not find that the relation is spurious due to correlations arising from biased metallicity measurements, or fiber aperture effects. We emphasize that the dependence is weak/absent for massive galaxies ($\log M_*>10.5$), and that the overall scatter in the M-Z-SFR relation does not greatly decrease from the M-Z relation. We find that the dependence is stronger for the highest SSFR galaxies above the star-forming sequence. This two-mode behavior can be described with a broken linear fit in 12+log(O/H) vs. log (SFR$/M_*$), at a given $M_*$. Previous parameterizations used for comparative analysis with higher redshift samples that do not account for the more detailed behavior of the local M-Z-SFR relation may incorrectly lead to the conclusion that those samples follow a different relationship.
  • Using a sample of 299 Ha-selected galaxies at z~0.8, we study the relationship between galaxy stellar mass, gas-phase metallicity, and star formation rate (SFR), and compare to previous results. We use deep optical spectra obtained with the IMACS spectrograph at the Magellan telescope to measure strong oxygen lines. We combine these spectra and metallicities with (1) rest-frame UV-to-optical imaging, which allows us to determine stellar masses and dust attenuation corrections, and (2) Ha narrowband imaging, which provides a robust measure of the instantaneous SFR. Our sample spans stellar masses of 10^9 to 6*10^11 solar masses, SFRs of 0.4 to 270 solar masses per year, and metal abundances of 12+log(O/H)~8.3-9.1 (~0.4-2.6 solar metallicity). The correlations that we find between the Ha-based SFR and stellar mass (i.e., the star-forming "main sequence"), and between the stellar mass and metallicity, are both consistent with previous z~1 studies of star-forming galaxies. We then study the relationship between the three properties using various plane-fitting techniques (Lara-Lopez et al.) and a curve-fitting projection (Mannucci et al.). In all cases, we exclude strong dependence of the M-Z relation on SFR, but are unable to distinguish between moderate and no dependence. Our results are consistent with previous mass-metallicity-SFR studies. We check whether dataset limitations may obscure a strong dependence on the SFR by using mock samples drawn from the SDSS. These experiments reveal that the adopted signal-to-noise cuts may have a significant effect on the measured dependence. Further work is needed to investigate these results, and to test whether a "fundamental metallicity relation" or a "fundamental plane" describes star-forming galaxies across cosmic time.
  • We study the effects of radio jets on galaxies in their vicinity (satellites) and the role of satellites in triggering radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The study compares the aggregate properties of satellites of a sample of 7,220 radio AGNs at z < 0.3 (identified by Best & Heckman 2012 from the SDSS and NVSS+FIRST surveys) to the satellites of a control sample of radio-quiet galaxies, which are matched in redshift, color, luminosity, and axis ratio, as well as by environment type: field galaxies, cluster members and brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). Remarkably, we find that radio AGNs exhibit on average a 50% excess (17{\sigma} significance) in the number of satellites within 100 kpc even though the cluster membership was controlled for (e.g., radio BCGs have more satellites than radio-quiet BCGs, etc.). Satellite excess is not confirmed for high-excitation sources, which are only 2% of radio AGN. Extra satellites may be responsible for raising the probability for hot gas AGN accretion via tidal effects or may otherwise enhance the intensity or duration of the radio-emitting phase. Furthermore, we find that the incidence of radio AGNs among potential hosts (massive ellipticals) is similar for field galaxies and for non-BCG cluster members, suggesting that AGN fueling depends primarily on conditions in the host halo rather than the parent, cluster halo. Regarding feedback, we find that radio AGNs, either high or low excitation, have no detectable effect on star formation in their satellites, as neither induced star formation nor star formation quenching is present in more than ~1% of radio AGN.
  • We characterize the incidence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is 0.3 < z < 1 star-forming galaxies by applying multi-wavelength AGN diagnostics (X-ray, optical, mid-infrared, radio) to a sample of galaxies selected at 70-micron from the Far-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy survey (FIDEL). Given the depth of FIDEL, we detect "normal" galaxies on the specific star formation rate (sSFR) sequence as well as starbursting systems with elevated sSFR. We find an overall high occurrence of AGN of 37+/-3%, more than twice as high as in previous studies of galaxies with comparable infrared luminosities and redshifts but in good agreement with the AGN fraction of nearby (0.05 < z < 0.1) galaxies of similar infrared luminosities. The more complete census of AGNs comes from using the recently developed Mass-Excitation (MEx) diagnostic diagram. This optical diagnostic is also sensitive to X-ray weak AGNs and X-ray absorbed AGNs, and reveals that absorbed active nuclei reside almost exclusively in infrared-luminous hosts. The fraction of galaxies hosting an AGN appears to be independent of sSFR and remains elevated both on the sSFR sequence and above. In contrast, the fraction of AGNs that are X-ray absorbed increases substantially with increasing sSFR, possibly due to an increased gas fraction and/or gas density in the host galaxies.
  • The shutdown of star formation in galaxies is generally termed `quenching'. Although quenching may occur through a variety of processes, the exact mechanism(s) that is in fact responsible for quenching is still in question. This paper addresses quenching by searching for traces of possible quenching processes through their effects on galaxy structural parameters such as surface stellar mass density and Sersic index (n). We analyze the rest-frame U-B color correlations versus these structural parameters using a sample of galaxies in the redshift range 0.5< z<0.8 from the DEEP2/AEGIS survey. We find that Sersic index (n) has the smallest overlap region among all tested parameters and resembles a step-function with a threshold value of n=2.3. There exists, however, a significant population of outliers with blue colors yet high n values that seem to contradict this behavior. We hypothesize that their Sersic values may be distorted by bursts of star formation, AGNs, and/or poor fits, leading us to consider central surface stellar mass density as an alternative to Sersic index. Not only does it correct the outliers, it also forms a tight relationship with color, suggesting that the innermost structure of galaxies is most physically linked with quenching. Furthermore, at z~0.65, the majority of the blue cloud galaxies cannot simply fade onto the red sequence since their GIM2D bulge masses are only half as large on average as the bulge masses of similar red sequence galaxies, thus demonstrating that stellar mass must absolutely increase at the centers of galaxies as they quench. We discuss a two-stage model for quenching in which galaxy star formation rates are controlled by their dark halos while they are still in the blue cloud and a second quenching process sets in later, associated with the central stellar mass build-up.
  • UV observations in the local universe have uncovered a population of early-type galaxies with UV flux consistent with low-level recent or ongoing star formation. We present resolved UV-optical photometry of a sample of 19 SDSS early-type galaxies at z~0.1 drawn from the sample originally selected by Salim & Rich (2010) to lie in the bluer part of the green valley in the UV-optical color-magnitude diagram as measured by GALEX. Utilizing high-resolution HST far-UV imaging provides unique insight into the distribution of UV light in these galaxies, which we call "extended star-forming early-type galaxies" (ESF-ETGs) because of extended UV emission that is indicative of recent star formation. The UV-optical color profiles of all ESF-ETGs show red centers and blue outer parts. Their outer colors require the existence of a significant underlying population of older stars in the UV-bright regions. Analysis of stacked SDSS spectra reveals weak LINER-like emission in their centers. Using a cross-matched SDSS DR7/GALEX GR6 catalog, we search for other green valley galaxies with similar properties to these ESF-ETGs and estimate that ~13% of dust-corrected green valley galaxies of similar stellar mass and UV-optical color are likely ESF-candidates, i.e., ESF-ETGs are not rare. Our results are consistent with star formation that is gradually declining in existing disks, i.e., the ESF-ETGs are evolving onto the red sequence for the first time, or with rejuvenated star formation due to accreted gas in older disks provided that the gas does not disrupt the structure of the galaxy and the resulting star formation is not too recent and bursty. ESF-ETGs may typify an important subpopulation of galaxies that can linger in the green valley for up to several Gyrs, based on their resemblance to nearby gas-rich green valley galaxies with low-level ongoing star formation. (abridged)
  • We study the dependence of star-formation quenching on galaxy mass and environment, in the SDSS (z~0.1) and the AEGIS (z~1). It is crucial that we define quenching by low star-formation rate rather than by red colour, given that one third of the red galaxies are star forming. We address stellar mass M*, halo mass Mh, density over the nearest N neighbours deltaN, and distance to the halo centre D. The fraction of quenched galaxies appears more strongly correlated with Mh at fixed M* than with M* at fixed Mh, while for satellites quenching also depends on D. We present the M*-Mh relation for centrals at z~1. At z~1, the dependence of quenching on M* at fixed Mh is somewhat more pronounced than at z~0, but the quenched fraction is low (10%) and the haloes are less massive. For satellites, M*-dependent quenching is noticeable at high D, suggesting a quenching dependence on sub-halo mass for recently captured satellites. At small D, where satellites likely fell in more than a few Gyr ago, quenching strongly depends on Mh, and not on M*. The Mh-dependence of quenching is consistent with theoretical wisdom where virial shock heating in massive haloes shuts down accretion and triggers ram-pressure stripping, causing quenching. The interpretation of deltaN is complicated by the fact that it depends on the number of observed group members compared to N, motivating the use of D as a better measure of local environment.
  • In this paper we posit that galaxy luminosity functions (LFs) come in two fundamentally different types depending on whether the luminosity traces galaxy stellar mass or its current star formation rate (SFR). Mass function types reflect the older stars and therefore the stellar mass distribution, while SFR function types arise from the young stars and hence the distribution of SFRs. Optical and near-infrared LFs are of the mass function type, and are well fit by a Schechter function (power law with an exponential cutoff at the bright end). In contrast, LFs of the SFR function type are of a different form, one that cannot be adequately described by a Schechter function. We demonstrate this difference by generating SFR distributions for mock samples of galaxies drawn from a Schechter stellar mass distribution along with established empirical relations between the SFR and stellar mass. Compared with the Schechter function, SFR distributions have a shallower decline at the bright end, which can be traced to the large intrinsic scatter of SFRs at any given stellar mass. A superior description of SFR distributions is given by the "Saunders" function, which combines a power law with a Gaussian at the high end. We show that the Schechter-like appearance of UV and H alpha LFs, although they are LFs of SFR function type, results when luminosities are not corrected for dust, or when average statistical corrections are used because individual attenuation measurements are not available. We thus infer that the non-Schechter form of the far-IR LFs is a true reflection of the underlying SFR distribution, rather than the purported artifact of AGN contamination.
  • We present measurements of the dust attenuation of H\alpha-selected emission-line galaxies at z=0.8 from the NewH\alpha\ narrowband survey. The analysis is based on deep follow-up spectroscopy with Magellan/IMACS, which captures the strong rest-frame optical emission lines from [OII] \lambda 3727 to [OIII] \lambda 5007. The spectroscopic sample used in this analysis consists of 341 confirmed H\alpha\ emitters. We place constraints on the AGN fraction using diagnostics which can be applied at intermediate redshift. We find that at least 5% of the objects in our spectroscopic sample can be classified as AGN and 2% are composite, i.e. powered by a combination of star-formation and AGN activity. We measure the dust attenuation for individual objects from the ratios of the higher order Balmer lines. The H\beta\ and H\gamma\ pair of lines is detected with S/N>5 in 55 individual objects and the H\beta\ and H\delta\ pair is detected in 50 individual objects. We also create stacked spectra to probe the attenuation in objects without individual detections. The median attenuation at H\alpha\ based on the objects with individually detected lines is A(H\alpha)=0.9+-1.0 magnitudes, in good agreement with the attenuation found in local samples of star-forming galaxies. We find that the z=0.8 galaxies occupy a similar locus of attenuation as a function of magnitude, mass and SFR as a comparison sample drawn from the SDSS DR4. Both the results from the individual z=0.8 galaxies and from the stacked spectra show consistency with the mass -- attenuation and SFR -- attenuation relations found in the local Universe, indicating that these relations are also applicable at intermediate redshift.
  • This paper examines star formation (SF) in relatively massive, primarily early-type galaxies (ETGs) at z~0.1. A sample is drawn from bulge-dominated GALEX/SDSS galaxies on the optical red sequence with strong UV excess and yet quiescent SDSS spectra. High-resolution far-UV imaging of 27 such ETGs using HST ACS/SBC reveals structured UV morphology in 93% of the sample, consistent with low-level ongoing SF (~0.5 Ms/yr). In 3/4 of the sample the SF is extended on galaxy scales (25-75 kpc), while the rest contains smaller (5-15 kpc) SF patches in the vicinity of an ETG - presumably gas-rich satellites being disrupted. Optical imaging reveals that all ETGs with galaxy-scale SF in our sample have old stellar disks (mostly S0 type). None is classified as a true elliptical. In our sample, galaxy-scale SF takes the form of UV rings of varying sizes and morphologies. For the majority of such objects we conclude that the gas needed to fuel current SF has been accreted from the IGM, probably in a prolonged, quasi-static manner, leading in some cases to additional disk buildup. The remaining ETGs with galaxy-scale SF have UV and optical morphologies consistent with minor merger-driven SF or with the final stages of SF in fading spirals. Our analysis excludes that all recent SF on the red sequence resulted from gas-rich mergers. We find further evidence that galaxy-scale SF is almost exclusively an S0 phenomenon (~20% S0s have SF) by examining the overall optically red SDSS ETGs. Conclusion is that significant number of field S0s maintain or resume low-level SF because the preventive feedback is not in place or is intermittent. True ellipticals, on the other hand, stay entirely quiescent even in the field.
  • We present the average metallicity and star-formation rate of Lya emitters (LAEs) measured from our large-area survey with three narrow-band (NB) filters covering the Lya, [OII]3727, and Ha+[NII] lines of LAEs at z=2.2. We select 919 z=2.2 LAEs from Subaru/Suprime-Cam NB data in conjunction with Magellan/IMACS spectroscopy. Of these LAEs, 561 and 105 are observed with KPNO/NEWFIRM near-infrared NB filters whose central wavelengths are matched to redshifted [OII] and Ha nebular lines, respectively. By stacking the near-infrared images of the LAEs, we successfully obtain average nebular-line fluxes of LAEs, the majority of which are too faint to be identified individually by narrow-band imaging or deep spectroscopy. The stacked object has an Ha luminosity of 1.7x10^{42} erg s^{-1} corresponding to a star formation rate (SFR) of 14 M_{sun} yr^{-1}. We place, for the first time, a firm lower limit to the average metallicity of LAEs of Z>~0.09 Z_{sun} (2sigma) based on the [OII]/(Ha+[NII]) index together with photo-ionization models and empirical relations. This lower limit of metallicity rules out the hypothesis that LAEs, so far observed at z~2, are extremely metal poor (Z<2x10^{-2} Z_{sun}) young galaxies at the 4sigma level. This limit is higher than a simple extrapolation of the observed mass-metallicity relation of z~2 UV-selected galaxies toward lower masses (5x10^{8} M_{sun}), but roughly consistent with a recently proposed fundamental mass-metallicity relation when the LAEs' relatively low SFR is taken into account. The Ha and Lya luminosities of our NB-selected LAEs indicate that the escape fraction of Lya photons is ~12-30 %, much higher than the values derived for other galaxy populations at z~2.
  • We present a star-formation rate calibration based on optical data that is consistent with average observed rates in both the red and blue galaxy populations at z~1. The motivation for this study is to calculate SFRs for DEEP2 Redshift Survey galaxies in the 0.7<z<1.4 redshift range, but our results are generally applicable to similar optically-selected galaxy samples without requiring UV or IR data. Using SFRs fit from UV/optical SEDs in the AEGIS survey, we explore the behavior of restframe B-band magnitude, observed [OII] luminosity, and restframe (U-B) color with SED-fit SFR for both red sequence and blue cloud galaxies. We find that a SFR calibration can be calculated for all z~1 DEEP2 galaxies using a simultaneous fit in M_B and restframe colors with residual errors that are within the SFR measurement error. The resulting SFR calibration produces fit residual errors of 0.3 dex RMS scatter for the full color-independent sample with minimal correlated residual error in L[OII] or stellar mass. We then compare the calibrated z~1 SFRs to two diagnostics that use L[OII] as a tracer in local galaxies and correct for dust extinction at intermediate redshifts through either galaxy B-band luminosity or stellar mass. We find that a L[OII] - M_B SFR calibration commonly used in the literature agrees well with our calculated SFRs after correcting for the average B-band luminosity evolution in L* galaxies. However, we find better agreement with a local L[OII]-based SFR calibration that includes stellar mass to correct for reddening effects, indicating that stellar mass is a better tracer of dust extinction for all galaxy types and less affected by systematic evolution than galaxy luminosity from z=1 to the current epoch.
  • The `Eagle' galaxy at a redshift of 0.77 is studied with the Oxford Short Wavelength Integral Field Spectrograph (SWIFT) and multi-wavelength data from the All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS). It was chosen from AEGIS because of the bright and extended emission in its slit spectrum. Three dimensional kinematic maps of the Eagle reveal a gradient in velocity dispersion which spans 35-75 +/- 10 km/s and a rotation velocity of 25 +/- 5 km/s uncorrected for inclination. Hubble Space Telescope images suggest it is close to face-on. In comparison with galaxies from AEGIS at similar redshifts, the Eagle is extremely bright and blue in the rest-frame optical, highly star-forming, dominated by unobscured star-formation, and has a low metallicity for its size. This is consistent with its selection. The Eagle is likely undergoing a major merger and is caught in the early stage of a star-burst when it has not yet experienced metal enrichment or formed the mass of dust typically found in star-forming galaxies.
  • We present quantitative morphologies of ~300 galaxies in the optically-defined green valley at 0.4<z<1.2, in order to constrain the mechanism(s) responsible for quenching star formation in the bulk of this population. The sample is selected from galaxies in the All-Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS). While the green valley is defined using optical U-B colors, we find that using a green valley sample defined using NUV-R colors does not change the results. Using HST/ACS imaging, we study several quantitative morphological parameters including CAS, B/T from GIM2D, and Gini/M_20. We find that the green galaxy population is intermediate between the red and blue galaxy populations in terms of concentration, asymmetry, and morphological type and merger fraction estimated using Gini/M_20. We find that most green galaxies are not classified as mergers; in fact, the merger fraction in the green valley is lower than in the blue cloud. We show that at a given stellar mass, green galaxies have higher concentration values than blue galaxies and lower concentration values than red galaxies. Additionally, we find that 12% of green galaxies have B/T = 0 and 21% with B/T \leq 0.05. Our results show that green galaxies are generally massive (M\ast ~ 10^10.5 M_sun) disk galaxies with high concentrations. We conclude that major mergers are likely not the sole mechanism responsible for quenching star formation in this population and that either other external processes or internal secular processes play an important role both in driving gas towards the center of these galaxies and in quenching star formation.
  • We present a new analysis of the dust obscuration in starburst galaxies at low and high redshift. This study is motivated by our unique sample of the most extreme UV-selected starburst galaxies in the nearby universe (z<0.3), found to be good analogs of high-redshift Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) in most of their physical properties. We find that the dust properties of the Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs) are consistent with the relation derived previously by Meurer et al. (M99) that is commonly used to dust-correct star formation rate measurements at a very wide range of redshifts. We directly compare our results with high redshift samples (LBGs, BzK, and sub-mm galaxies at z=2-3) having IR data either from Spitzer or Herschel. The attenuation in typical LBGs at z=2-3 and LBAs is very similar. Because LBAs are much better analogs to LBGs compared to previous local star-forming samples, including M99, the practice of dust-correcting the SFRs of high redshift galaxies based on the local calibration is now placed on a much more solid ground. We illustrate the importance of this result by showing how the locally calibrated relation between UV measurements and extinction is used to estimate the integrated, dust-corrected star formation rate density at z=2-6.
  • We measure the UV-optical color dependence of galaxy clustering in the local universe. Using the clean separation of the red and blue sequences made possible by the NUV - r color-magnitude diagram, we segregate the galaxies into red, blue and intermediate "green" classes. We explore the clustering as a function of this segregation by removing the dependence on luminosity and by excluding edge-on galaxies as a means of a non-model dependent veto of highly extincted galaxies. We find that \xi (r_p, \pi) for both red and green galaxies shows strong redshift space distortion on small scales -- the "finger-of-God" effect, with green galaxies having a lower amplitude than is seen for the red sequence, and the blue sequence showing almost no distortion. On large scales, \xi (r_p, \pi) for all three samples show the effect of large-scale streaming from coherent infall. On scales 1 Mpc/h < r_p < 10 Mpc/h, the projected auto-correlation function w_p(r_p) for red and green galaxies fits a power-law with slope \gamma ~ 1.93 and amplitude r_0 ~ 7.5 and 5.3, compared with \gamma ~ 1.75 and r_0 ~ 3.9 Mpc/h for blue sequence galaxies. Compared to the clustering of a fiducial L* galaxy, the red, green, and blue have a relative bias of 1.5, 1.1, and 0.9 respectively. The w_p(r_p) for blue galaxies display an increase in convexity at ~ 1 Mpc/h, with an excess of large scale clustering. Our results suggest that the majority of blue galaxies are likely central galaxies in less massive halos, while red and green galaxies have larger satellite fractions, and preferentially reside in virialized structures. If blue sequence galaxies migrate to the red sequence via processes like mergers or quenching that take them through the green valley, such a transformation may be accompanied by a change in environment in addition to any change in luminosity and color.
  • In recent years argument has been made that a high fraction of early-type galaxies in the local universe experience low levels (< 1 M_sun/yr) of star formation (SF) that causes strong excess in UV flux, yet leaves the optical colors red. Many of these studies were based on GALEX imaging of SDSS galaxies (z~0.1), and were thus limited by its 5" FWHM. Poor UV resolution left other possibilities for UV excess open, such as the old populations or an AGN. Here we study high-resolution far-ultraviolet HST/ACS images of optically quiescent early-type galaxies with strong UV excess. The new images show that three-quarters of these moderately massive (~5x10^10 M_sun) early-type galaxies shows clear evidence of extended SF, usually in form of wide or concentric UV rings, and in some cases, striking spiral arms. SDSS spectra probably miss these features due to small fiber size. UV-excess early-type galaxies have on average less dust and larger UV sizes (D>40 kpc) than other green-valley galaxies, which argues for an external origin for the gas that is driving the SF. Thus, most of these galaxies appear `rejuvenated' (e.g., through minor gas-rich mergers or IGM accretion). For a smaller subset of the sample, the declining SF (from the original internal gas) cannot be ruled out. SF is rare in very massive early-types (M_* > 10^11 M_sun), a possible consequence of AGN feedback. In addition to extended UV emission, many galaxies show a compact central source, which may be a weak, optically inconspicuous AGN.
  • (abridged) Using a complete sample of ~300 star-forming galaxies within 11 Mpc, we evaluate the consistency between star formation rates (SFRs) inferred from the far ultraviolet (FUV) non-ionizing continuum and H-alpha nebular emission, assuming standard conversion recipes in which the SFR scales linearly with luminosity at a given wavelength. Our analysis probes SFRs over 5 orders of magnitude, down to ultra-low activities on the order of ~0.0001 M_sun/yr. The data are drawn from the 11 Mpc H-alpha and Ultraviolet Galaxy Survey (11HUGS), which has obtained H-alpha fluxes from ground-based narrowband imaging, and UV fluxes from imaging with GALEX. For normal spiral galaxies (SFR~1 M_sun/yr), our results are consistent with previous work which has shown that FUV SFRs tend to be lower than H-alpha SFRs before accounting for internal dust attenuation, but that there is relative consistency between the two tracers after proper corrections are applied. However, a puzzle is encountered at the faint end of the luminosity function. As lower luminosity dwarf galaxies, roughly less active than the Small Magellanic Cloud, are examined, H-alpha tends to increasingly under-predict the SFR relative to the FUV. Although past studies have suggested similar trends, this is the first time this effect is probed with a statistical sample for galaxies with SFR~<0.1 M_sun/yr. A range of standard explanations does not appear to be able to account for the magnitude of the systematic. Some recent work has argued for an IMF which is deficient in high mass stars in dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies, and we also consider this scenario.