• We investigate cross-layer optimization to route information across distributed wireless body-to-body networks, based on real-life experimental measurements. At the network layer, the best possible route is selected according to channel state information (e.g., expected transmission count, hop count) from the physical layer. Two types of dynamic routing are applied: shortest path routing (SPR), and cooperative multi-path routing (CMR) associated with selection combining. An open-access experimental dataset incorporating `everyday' mixed-activities is used for analyzing and comparing the cross-layer optimization with different wireless sensor network protocols (i.e., ORPL, LOADng). Negligible packet error rate is achieved by applying CMR and SPR techniques with reasonably sensitive receivers. Moreover, at 10% outage probability, CMR gains up to 8, 7, and 6 dB improvements over ORPL, SPR, and LOADng, respectively. We show that CMR achieves the highest throughput (packets/s) while providing acceptable amount of average end-to-end delay (47.5 ms), at -100 dBm receive sensitivity. The use of alternate paths in CMR reduces retransmissions and increases packet success rate, which significantly reduces the maximum amount of end-to-end delay and energy consumption for CMR with respect to other protocols. It is also shown that the combined channel gains across SPR and CMR are gamma and Rician distributed, correspondingly.
  • The existence of wide-sense-stationarity (WSS) in narrowband wireless body-to-body networks is investigated for "everyday" scenarios using many hours of contiguous experimental data. We employ different parametric and non-parametric hypothesis tests for evaluating mean and variance stationarity, along with distribution consistency, of several body-to-body channels found from different on-body sensor locations. We also estimate the variation of power spectrum to evaluate the time independence of the auto-covariance function. Our results show that, with 95% confidence, the assumption of WSS is met for at most 90% of the cases with window lengths of 5 seconds for the channels between the hubs of different BANs. Additionally, in the best-case scenario, the hub-to-hub channel remains reasonably stationary (with more than 80% probability of satisfying the null hypothesis) for longer window lengths of more than 10 seconds. The short time power spectral variation for body-to-body channels is also shown to be negligible. Moreover, we show that body-to-body channels can be considered wide-sense-stationary over significantly longer periods than on-body channels.
  • In this paper, we propose a novel adaptive carrier sense multiple access scheme with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) to perform efficient and reliable data transfer with increased throughput across multiple coexisting wireless body area networks (BANs) in a tiered architecture. We investigate the proposed scheme using two distributed cross-layer optimized dynamic routing techniques, i.e., shortest path routing (SPR) and cooperative multi-path routing (CMR). The channel state information from the physical layer is passed on to the network layer using an adaptive cross-layer carrier sensing mechanism between the physical and MAC layer, which adjusts the carrier sense threshold (e.g., RSSI) periodically based on the slowly-varying channel condition. An open-access experimental dataset of 'everyday' mixed-activities is used for analyzing the cross-layer optimization. Our proposed optimization using adaptive carrier sensing performs better than static carrier sensing with CSMA/CA as it reduces the continuous back-off duration and latency as well as significantly increases the throughput (in successful packets/s) by more than 50%. Adaptive CSMA/CA also shows 20% and 6% improvement over a coordinated TDMA approach with higher duty cycle for throughput and spectral efficiency, respectively, and provides acceptable packet delivery ratio and outage probability with respect to SINR.