• Motivated by a universal need for cost-efficient data collection, we propose a unifying framework for optimal design of observational studies. In this framework, the design is defined as a probability measure in the space of observational processes that determine whether the value of a variable is observed for a specific unit at the given time. The framework allows one to optimize decisions on three design dimensions: unit, variable and time. The optimal observational design maximizes the utility defined as a function of model parameters, data and policy decisions. We discuss computational methods that can be used to find optimal or approximately optimal designs. We review a wide variety of design problems that can be cast in the proposed framework, including sample size determination, subsample selection, selection for re-measurements, choice of measurement times, and optimization of spatial measurement networks.
  • We introduce a fully length-based Bayesian model for the population dynamics of northern shrimp (Pandalus Borealis). This has the advantage of structuring the population in terms of a directly observable quantity, requiring no indirect estimation of age distributions from measurements of size. The introduced model is intended as a simplistic prototype around which further developments and refinements can be built. As a case study, we use the model to analyze the population of Skagerrak and the Norwegian Deep in the years 1988-2012.
  • We review a success story regarding Bayesian inference in fisheries management in the Baltic Sea. The management of salmon fisheries is currently based on the results of a complex Bayesian population dynamic model, and managers and stakeholders use the probabilities in their discussions. We also discuss the technical and human challenges in using Bayesian modeling to give practical advice to the public and to government officials and suggest future areas in which it can be applied. In particular, large databases in fisheries science offer flexible ways to use hierarchical models to learn the population dynamics parameters for those by-catch species that do not have similar large stock-specific data sets like those that exist for many target species. This information is required if we are to understand the future ecosystem risks of fisheries.