• We show how adaptive protocols of quantum and private communication through bosonic Gaussian channels can be simplified into much easier block versions that involve resource states with finite energy. This is achieved by combining the adaptive-to-block reduction technique devised earlier [S. Pirandola et al., Nat. Commun. 8, 15043 (2017)], based on teleportation stretching and relative entropy of entanglement, with an alternative simulation of Gaussian channels recently introduced by Liuzzo-Scorpo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 120503 (2017)]. In this way, we derive weak converse upper bounds for the secret-key capacity of phase-insensitive Gaussian channels, which approximate the optimal limit for infinite energy. Our results apply to both point-to-point and repeater-assisted private communications.
  • In bosonic quantum metrology, the estimate of a loss parameter is typically performed by means of pure states, such as coherent, squeezed or entangled states, while mixed thermal probes are discarded for their inferior performance. Here we show that thermal sources with suitable correlations can be engineered in such a way to approach, or even surpass, the error scaling of coherent states in the presence of general Gaussian decoherence. Our findings pave the way for practical quantum metrology with thermal sources in optical instruments (e.g., photometers) or at different wavelengths (e.g., far infrared, microwave or X-ray) where the generation of quantum features, such as coherence, squeezing or entanglement, may be extremely challenging.
  • We review recent results on the simulation of quantum channels, the reduction of adaptive protocols (teleportation stretching), and the derivation of converse bounds for quantum and private communication, as established in PLOB [Pirandola, Laurenza, Ottaviani, Banchi, arXiv:1510.08863]. We start by introducing a general weak converse bound for private communication based on the relative entropy of entanglement. We discuss how combining this bound with channel simulation and teleportation stretching, PLOB established the two-way quantum and private capacities of several fundamental channels, including the bosonic lossy channel. We then provide a rigorous proof of the strong converse property of these bounds by adopting a correct use of the Braunstein-Kimble teleportation protocol for the simulation of bosonic Gaussian channels. This analysis provides a full justification of claims presented in the follow-up paper WTB [Wilde, Tomamichel, Berta, arXiv:1602.08898] whose upper bounds for Gaussian channels would be otherwise infinitely large. Besides clarifying contributions in the area of channel simulation and protocol reduction, we also present some generalizations of the tools to other entanglement measures and novel results on the maximum excess noise which is tolerable in quantum key distribution.
  • In this review we discuss how channel simulation can be used to simplify the most general protocols of quantum parameter estimation, where unlimited entanglement and adaptive joint operations may be employed. Whenever the unknown parameter encoded in a quantum channel is completely transferred in an environmental program state simulating the channel, the optimal adaptive estimation cannot beat the standard quantum limit. In this setting, we elucidate the crucial role of quantum teleportation as a primitive operation which allows one to completely reduce adaptive protocols over suitable teleportation-covariant channels and derive matching upper and lower bounds for parameter estimation. For these channels, we may express the quantum Cram\'er Rao bound directly in terms of their Choi matrices. Our review considers both discrete- and continuous-variable systems, also presenting some new results for bosonic Gaussian channels using an alternative sub-optimal simulation. It is an open problem to design simulations for quantum channels that achieve the Heisenberg limit.
  • We consider the Braunstein-Kimble protocol for continuous variable teleportation and its application for the simulation of bosonic channels. We discuss the convergence properties of this protocol under various topologies (strong, uniform, and bounded-uniform) clarifying some typical misinterpretations in the literature. We then show that the teleportation simulation of an arbitrary single-mode Gaussian channel is uniformly convergent to the channel if and only if its noise matrix has full rank. The various forms of convergence are then discussed within adaptive protocols, where the simulation error must be propagated to the output of the protocol by means of a "peeling" argument, following techniques from PLOB [arXiv:1510.08863]. Finally, as an application of the peeling argument and the various topologies of convergence, we provide complete rigorous proofs for recently-claimed strong converse bounds for private communication over Gaussian channels.
  • We consider the secret key capacity of the thermal loss channel, which is modeled by a beam splitter mixing an input signal mode with an environmental thermal mode. This capacity is the maximum value of secret bits that two remote parties can generate by means of the most general adaptive protocols assisted by unlimited and two-way classical communication. To date, only upper and lower bounds are known. The present work improves the lower bound by resorting to Gaussian protocols based on suitable trusted-noise detectors.
  • The security proof of continuous variable (CV) measurement device independent (MDI) quantum key distribution (QKD) cannot be reduced to the analysis of one-mode Gaussian attacks (in particular, independent entangling-cloner attacks). To stress this point, the present note provides a very simple (almost trivial) argument, showing that there are an infinite number of two-mode Gaussian attacks which cannot be reduced to or simulated by one-mode Gaussian attacks. This result further confirms that the security analysis of CV-MDI-QKD must involve a careful minimization over two-mode attacks as originally performed in [S. Pirandola et al., Nature Photon. 9, 397-402 (2015)].
  • We consider two remote parties connected to a relay by two quantum channels. To generate a secret key, they transmit coherent states to the relay, where the states are subject to a continuous-variable (CV) Bell detection. We study the ideal case where Alice's channel is lossless, i.e., the relay is locally situated in her lab and the Bell detection is performed with unit efficiency. This configuration allows us to explore the optimal performances achievable by CV measurement-device-independent (MDI) quantum key distribution (QKD). This corresponds to the limit of a trusted local relay, where the detection loss can be re-scaled. Our theoretical analysis is confirmed by an experimental simulation where 10^-4 secret bits per use can potentially be distributed at 170km assuming ideal reconciliation.
  • We consider the asymmetric formulation of quantum hypothesis testing, where two quantum hypotheses have different associated costs. In this problem, the aim is to minimize the probability of false negatives and the optimal performance is provided by the quantum Hoeffding bound. After a brief review of these notions, we show how this bound can be simplified for pure states. We then provide a general recipe for its computation in the case of multimode Gaussian states, also showing its connection with other easier-to-compute lower bounds. In particular, we provide analytical formulas and numerical results for important classes of one- and two-mode Gaussian states.
  • Nonclassical states of light play a central role in many quantum information protocols. Their quantum features have been exploited to improve the readout of information from digital memories, modelled as arrays of microscopic beam splitters [S. Pirandola, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 090504 (2011)]. In this model of quantum reading, a nonclassical source of light with Einstein-Podolski-Rosen correlations has been proven to retrieve more information than any classical source. In particular, the quantum-classical comparison has been performed under a global energy constraint, i.e., by fixing the mean total number of photons irradiated over each memory cell. In this paper we provide an alternative analysis which is based on a local energy constraint, meaning that we fix the mean number of photons per signal mode irradiated over the memory cell. Under this assumption, we investigate the critical number of signal modes after which a nonclassical source of light is able to beat any classical source irradiating the same number of signals.
  • In a comment, Xu, Curty, Qi, Qian, and Lo claimed that discrete-variable (DV) measurement device independent (MDI) quantum key distribution (QKD) would compete with its continuous-variable (CV) counterpart at metropolitan distances. Actually, Xu et al.'s analysis supports exactly the opposite by showing that the experimental rate of our CV protocol (achieved with practical room-temperature devices) remains one order of magnitude higher than their purely-numerical and over-optimistic extrapolation for qubits, based on nearly-ideal parameters and cryogenic detectors (unsuitable solutions for a realistic metropolitan network, which is expected to run on cheap room-temperature devices, potentially even mobile). The experimental rate of our protocol (expressed as bits per relay use) is confirmed to be two-three orders of magnitude higher than the rate of any realistic simulation of practical DV-MDI-QKD over short-medium distances. Of course this does not mean that DV-MDI-QKD networks should not be investigated or built, but increasing their rate is a non-trivial practical problem clearly beyond the analysis of Xu et al. Finally, in order to clarify the facts, we also refute a series of incorrect arguments against CV-MDI-QKD and, more generally, CV-QKD, which were made by Xu et al. with the goal of supporting their thesis.
  • We derive a computable analytical formula for the quantum fidelity between two arbitrary multimode Gaussian states which is simply expressed in terms of their first- and second-order statistical moments. We also show how such a formula can be written in terms of symplectic invariants and used to derive closed forms for a variety of basic quantities and tools, such as the Bures metric, the quantum Fisher information and various fidelity-based bounds. Our result can be used to extend the study of continuous-variable protocols, such as quantum teleportation and cloning, beyond the current one-mode or two-mode analyses, and paves the way to solve general problems in quantum metrology and quantum hypothesis testing with arbitrary multimode Gaussian resources.
  • We consider the continuous-variable protocol of Pirandola et al. [Nature Photonics 9, 397-402 (2015), see also arXiv.1312.4104] where the secret-key is established by the measurement of an untrusted relay. In this network protocol, two authorized parties are connected to an untrusted relay by insecure quantum links. Secret correlations are generated by a continuous-variable Bell detection performed on incoming coherent states. In the present work we provide a detailed study of the symmetric configuration, where the relay is midway between the parties. We analyze symmetric eavesdropping strategies against the quantum links explicitly showing that, at fixed transmissivity and thermal noise, two-mode coherent attacks are optimal, manifestly outperforming one-mode collective attacks based on independent entangling cloners. Such an advantage is shown both in terms of security threshold and secret-key rate.
  • Quantum teleportation is one of the most important protocols in quantum information. By exploiting the physical resource of entanglement, quantum teleportation serves as a key primitive in a variety of quantum information tasks and represents an important building block for quantum technologies, with a pivotal role in the continuing progress of quantum communication, quantum computing and quantum networks. Here we review the basic theoretical ideas behind quantum teleportation and its variant protocols. We focus on the main experiments, together with the technical advantages and disadvantages associated with the use of the various technologies, from photonic qubits and optical modes to atomic ensembles, trapped atoms, and solid-state systems. Analysing the current state-of-the-art, we finish by discussing open issues, challenges and potential future implementations.
  • We consider a quantum relay which is used by two parties to perform several continuous-variable protocols: Entanglement swapping, distillation, quantum teleportation, and quantum key distribution. The theory of these protocols is extended to a non-Markovian model of decoherence characterized by correlated Gaussian noise. Even if bipartite entanglement is completely lost at the relay, we show that the various protocols can progressively be reactivated by the separable noise-correlations of the environment. In fact, above a critical amount, these correlations are able to restore the distribution of quadripartite entanglement, which can be localized into an exploitable bipartite form by the action of the relay. Our findings are confirmed by a proof-of-principle experiment and show the potential advantages of non-Markovian effects in a quantum network architecture.
  • The preeminent view that evaporating black holes should simply be smaller black holes has been challenged by the firewall paradox. In particular, this paradox suggests that something different occurs once a black hole has evaporated to one-half its original surface area. Here we derive variations of the firewall paradox by tracking the thermodynamic entropy within a black hole across its entire lifetime. Our approach sweeps away many unnecessary assumptions, allowing us to demonstrate a paradox exists even after its initial onset (when conventional assumptions render earlier analyses invalid). Our results suggest that not only is the formation of a firewall the most natural resolution, but provides a mechanism for it. Finally, although firewalls cannot have evolved for modest-sized black holes, within the age of the universe, we speculate on the implications if they were ever unambiguously observed.
  • In this Letter we exploit the recently-solved conjecture on the bosonic minimum output entropy to show the optimality of Gaussian discord, so that the computation of quantum discord for bipartite Gaussian states can be restricted to local Gaussian measurements. We prove such optimality for a large family of Gaussian states, including all two-mode squeezed thermal states, which are the most typical Gaussian states realized in experiments. Our family also includes other types of Gaussian states and spans their entire set in a suitable limit where they become Choi-matrices of Gaussian channels. As a result, we completely characterize the quantum correlations possessed by some of the most important bosonic states in quantum optics and quantum information.
  • We extend the field of continuous-variable quantum cryptography to a network formulation where two honest parties connect to an untrusted relay by insecure quantum links. To generate secret correlations, they transmit coherent states to the relay where a continuous-variable Bell detection is performed and the outcome broadcast. Even though the detection could be fully corrupted and the links subject to optimal coherent attacks, the honest parties can still extract a secret key, achieving high rates when the relay is proximal to one party, as typical in public networks with access points or proxy servers. Our theory is confirmed by an experiment generating key-rates which are orders of magnitude higher than those achievable with discrete-variable protocols. Thus, using the cheapest possible quantum resources, we experimentally show the possibility of high-rate quantum key distribution in network topologies where direct links are missing between end-users and intermediate relays cannot be trusted.
  • Quantum key distribution (QKD) offers the promise of absolutely secure communications. However, proofs of absolute security often assume perfect implementation from theory to experiment. Thus, existing systems may be prone to insidious side-channel attacks that rely on flaws in experimental implementation. Here we replace all real channels with virtual channels in a QKD protocol, making the relevant detectors and settings inside private spaces inaccessible while simultaneously acting as a Hilbert space filter to eliminate side-channel attacks. By using a quantum memory we find that we are able to bound the secret-key rate below by the entanglement-distillation rate computed over the distributed states.
  • Classically, black holes are compact objects with perfect semi-permeable horizons: Anything may enter, nothing may leave. We consider an axiomatic approach that applies to any black hole type, including arbitrarily near-extremal black holes, that can unitarily evaporate away completely by any mechanism. We show that a quantum black hole must either have a leaky horizon (allowing quantum information out), or it must look very different from its classical counterpart having an external neighborhood consisting of exotic matter with super-ordinary entropic content (such as an `atmosphere' of microscopic black holes).
  • It has long been conjectured that the entropy of quantum fields across boundaries scales as the boundary area. This conjecture has not been easy to test in spacetime dimensions greater than four because of divergences in the von Neumann entropy. Here we show that the Renyi entropy provides a convergent alternative, yielding a quantitative measure of entanglement between quantum field theoretic degrees of freedom inside and outside hypersurfaces. For the first time, we show that the entanglement entropy in higher dimensions is proportional to the higher dimensional area. We also show that the Renyi entropy diverges at specific values of the Renyi parameter (q) in each dimension, but this divergence can be tamed by introducing a mass of the quantum field.
  • We show that, in order to preserve the equivalence principle until late times in unitarily evaporating black holes, the thermodynamic entropy of a black hole must be primarily entropy of entanglement across the event horizon. For such black holes, we show that the information entering a black hole becomes encoded in correlations within a tripartite quantum state, the quantum analogue of a one-time pad, and is only decoded into the outgoing radiation very late in the evaporation. This behavior generically describes the unitary evaporation of highly entangled black holes and requires no specially designed evolution. Our work suggests the existence of a matter-field sum rule for any fundamental theory.
  • In this paper, we study two different nonlinear interpolating paths in adiabatic evolution algorithms for solving a particular class of quantum search problems where both the initial and final Hamiltonian are one-dimensional projector Hamiltonians on the corresponding ground state. If the overlap between the initial state and final state of the quantum system is not equal to zero, both of these models can provide a constant time speedup over the usual adiabatic algorithms by increasing some another corresponding "complexity". But when the initial state has a zero overlap with the solution state in the problem, the second model leads to an infinite time complexity of the algorithm for whatever interpolating functions being applied while the first one can still provide a constant running time. However, inspired by a related reference, a variant of the first model can be constructed which also fails for the problem when the overlap is exactly equal to zero if we want to make up the "intrinsic" fault of the second model-an increase in energy. Two concrete theorems are given to serve as explanations why neither of these two models can improve the usual adiabatic evolution algorithms for the phenomenon above. These just tell us what should be noted when using certain nonlinear evolution paths in adiabatic quantum algorithms for some special kind of problems.
  • This paper aims to explore the inherent connection among Heisenberg groups, quantum Fourier transform and (quasiprobability) distribution functions. Distribution functions for continuous and finite quantum systems are examined first as a semiclassical approach to quantum probability distribution. This leads to studying certain functionals of a pair of "conjugate" observables, connected via the quantum Fourier transform. The Heisenberg groups emerge naturally from this study and we take a rapid look at their representations. The quantum Fourier transform appears as the intertwining operator of two equivalent representation arising out of an automorphism of the group. Distribution functions correspond to certain distinguished sets in the group algebra. The marginal properties of a particular class of distribution functions (Wigner distributions) arise from a class of automorphisms of the group algebra of the Heisenberg group. We then study the reconstruction of Wigner function from the marginal distributions via inverse Radon transform giving explicit formulas. We consider applications of our approach to quantum information processing and quantum process tomography.
  • Verlinde recently suggested that gravity, inertia, and even spacetime may be emergent properties of an underlying thermodynamic theory. This vision was motivated in part by Jacobson's 1995 surprise result that the Einstein equations of gravity follow from the thermodynamic properties of event horizons. Taking a first tentative step in such a program, we derive the evaporation rate (or radiation spectrum) from black hole event horizons in a spacetime-free manner. Our result relies on a Hilbert space description of black hole evaporation, symmetries therein which follow from the inherent high dimensionality of black holes, global conservation of the no-hair quantities, and the existence of Penrose processes. Our analysis is not wedded to standard general relativity and so should apply to extended gravity theories where we find that the black hole area must be replaced by some other property in any generalized area theorem.