• We have identified a merging galaxy cluster with evidence of two distinct sub-clusters. The X-ray and optical data suggest that the subclusters are moving away from each other after closest approach. This cluster merger was discovered from observations of the well localized short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 050509B. The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) source position is coincident with a cluster of galaxies ZwCl 1234.0+02916. The subsequent Swift/X-Ray Telescope (XRT) localization of the X-ray afterglow found the GRB coincident with 2MASX J12361286+2858580, a giant red elliptical galaxy in the cluster. Deep multi-epoch optical images were obtained to constrain the evolution of the GRB afterglow, including a 27480s exposure in the F814W band with Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), among the deepest imaging ever obtained towards a known galaxy cluster in a single passband. We perform a weak gravitational lensing analysis, including mapping the total mass distribution of the merger system. Combined with Chandra X-ray Observatory and Swift/XRT observations, we investigate the dynamical state of the merger to probe the nature of the dark matter component. Our weak gravitational lensing measurements reveal a separation of the X-ray centroid of the western subcluster from the center of the mass and galaxy light distributions, similar to that of the famous "Bullet cluster". We conclude that the "Burst cluster" is another candidate merger system for determining the nature of dark matter and for studying the environment of short GRBs. We discuss connections between the cluster dynamical state and/or matter composition and compact object mergers, the leading model for the origin of short GRBs. Finally, we present results from a weak lensing survey based on archival Very Large Telescope (VLT) images in the areas of 5 other short GRBs.
  • 4U 2206+54 is a high mass X-ray binary which has been suspected to contain a neutron star accreting from the wind of its companion BD +53 2790. Reig et al. have recently detected 5560 s period pulsations in both RXTE and INTEGRAL observations which they conclude are due to the spin of the neutron star. We present observations made with Suzaku which are contemporaneous with their RXTE observation of this source. We find strong pulsations at a period of 5554 +/- 9 s in agreement with their results. We also present a reanalysis of BeppoSAX observations of 4U 2206+54 made in 1998, in which we find strong pulsations at a period of 5420 +/- 28 seconds, revealing a spin-down trend in this long-period accreting pulsar. Analysis of these data suggests that the neutron star in this system is an accretion-powered magnetar.
  • GRB051022 was undetected to deep limits in early optical observations, but precise astrometry from radio and X-ray showed that it most likely originated in a galaxy at z~0.8. We report radio, optical, near infra-red and X-ray observations of GRB051022. Using the available X-ray and radio data, we model the afterglow and calculate the energetics of the afterglow, finding it to be an order of magnitude lower than that of the prompt emission. The broad-band modeling also allows us to precisely define various other physical parameters and the minimum required amount of extinction, to explain the absence of an optical afterglow. Our observations suggest a high extinction, at least 2.3 magnitudes in the infrared (J) and at least 5.4 magnitudes in the optical (U) in the host-galaxy restframe. Such high extinctions are unusual for GRBs, and likely indicate a geometry where our line of sight to the burst passes through a dusty region in the host that is not directly co-located with the burst itself.
  • We report the best evidence to date of a jet break in a short Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) afterglow, using Chandra and Swift XRT observations of the X-ray afterglow of GRB 051221A. The combined X-ray light curve, which has three breaks, is similar to those commonly observed in Swift observations of long GRBs. A flat segment of the light curve at ~0.1 days after the burst represents the first clear case of strong energy injection in the external shock of a short GRB afterglow. The last break occurs at ~4 days post-burst and breaks to a power-law decay index of ~2. We interpret this as a jet break, with important implications for models of short GRBs, since it requires collimation of the afterglow into a jet with an initial opening angle ~4-8 degrees and implies a total jet kinetic energy of E_jet ~(1-5) x 10^{49} erg. Combined with the lack of a jet break in GRB 050724, this suggests a wide range in jet collimation in short GRBs, with at least some having collimation similar to that found in long GRBs, though with significantly lower jet energies.
  • On 2004 December 27, a highly-energetic giant flare was recorded from the magnetar candidate SGR 1806-20. In the months preceding this flare, the persistent X-ray emission from this object began to undergo significant changes. Here, we report on the evolution of key spectral and temporal parameters prior to and following this giant flare. Using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, we track the pulse frequency of SGR 1806-20 and find that the spin-down rate of this SGR varied erratically in the months before and after the flare. Contrary to the giant flare in SGR 1900+14, we find no evidence for a discrete jump in spin frequency at the time of the December 27th flare (|dnu/nu| < 5 X 10^-6). In the months surrounding the flare, we find a strong correlation between pulsed flux and torque consistent with the model for magnetar magnetosphere electrodynamics proposed by Thompson, Lyutikov & Kulkarni (2002). As with the flare in SGR 1900+14, the pulse morphology of SGR 1806-20 changes drastically following the flare. Using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and other publicly available imaging X-ray detector observations, we construct a spectral history of SGR 1806-20 from 1993 to 2005. The usual magnetar persistent emission spectral model of a power-law plus a blackbody provides an excellent fit to the data. We confirm the earlier finding by Mereghetti et al. (2005) of increasing spectral hardness of SGR 1806-20 between 1993 and 2004. Contrary to the direct correlation between torque and spectral hardness proposed by Mereghetti et al., we find evidence for a sudden torque change that triggered a gradual hardening of the energy spectrum on a timescale of years. Interestingly, the spectral hardness, spin-down rate, pulsed, and phase-averaged of SGR 1806-20 all peak months before the flare epoch.
  • Before the official first-light images, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory obtained an X-ray image of the field to which its focal plane was first exposed. We describe this historic observation and report our study of the first Chandra field. Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detected 15 X-ray sources, the brightest being dubbed ``Leon X-1'' to honor the Chandra Telescope Scientist, Leon Van Speybroeck. Based upon our analysis of the X-ray data and spectroscopy at the European Southern Observatory (ESO; La Silla, Chile), we find that Leon X-1 is a Type-1 (unobscured) active galactic nucleus (AGN) at a redshift z=0.3207. Leon X-1 exhibits strong Fe II emission and a broad-line Balmer decrement that is unusually flat for an AGN. Within the context of the Eigenvector-1 correlation space, these properties suggest that Leon X-1 may be a massive (> 10**{9} solar mass) black hole, accreting at a rate approaching its Eddington limit.
  • We present new Chandra X-ray observations of the luminous X-ray cluster, MS0451.6-0305, at z=0.5386. Spectral imaging data for the cluster are consistent with an isothermal cluster of 10.0 - 10.6 +/-1.6 keV and an Fe abundance of 0.32-0.40 +/-0.13 solar. The systematic uncertainties, arising from calibration and model uncertainties, of the temperature determination are nearly the same size as the statistical uncertainties. We discuss the effects of the ACIS absorption correction on the spectral fitting. The effects of statistics and fitting assumptions of 2-D models for the X-ray surface brightness are thoroughly explored. This cluster appears to be elongated and so we quantify the effects of assuming an ellipsoidal gas distribution on the gas mass and the total gravitating mass estimates. These data are also jointly fit with previous S-Z observations to obtain an estimate of the cluster's distance assuming spherical symmetry. If we, instead, assume a Hubble constant, the X-ray and S-Z data are used together to test the consistency of an ellipsoidal gas distribution and to weakly constrain the intrinsic axis ratio. The mass derived from the X-ray data is consistent with the weak lensing and optical masses. We confirm that this cluster is very hot and massive, further supporting the conclusion of previous analyses that the universe has a low matter density and that cluster properties, including iron abundances, have not evolved much since z~0.5. We discuss the possible detection of a faint, soft, extended component that may be the by-product of hierarchical structure formation.
  • There exists a group of persistently faint galactic X-ray sources that, based on their location in the galaxy, high L_x/L_opt, association with X-ray bursts, and absence of low frequency X-ray pulsations, are thought to be low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). We present results from Chandra observations for eight of these systems: 4U 1708-408, 2S 1711-339, KS 1739-304, SLX 1735-269, GRS 1736-297, SLX 1746-331, 1E 1746.7-3224, and 4U 1812-12. Locations for all sources, excluding GRS 1736-297, SLX 1746-331, and KS 1739-304 (which were not detected) were improved to 0.6" error circles (90% confidence). Our observations support earlier findings of transient behavior of GRS 1736-297, KS 1739-304, SLX 1746-331, and 2S 1711-339 (which we detect in one of two observations). Energy spectra for 4U 1708-408, 2S 1711-339, SLX 1735-269, 1E 1746.7-3224, and 4U 1812-12 are hard, with power law indices typically 1.4-2.1, which are consistent with typical faint LMXB spectra.
  • We present X-ray imaging, timing, and phase resolved spectroscopy of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 4U 0142+61 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The spectrum is well described by a power law plus blackbody model with power law index = 3.35(2), kT_BB=0.458(3) keV, and N_H=0.91(2) x 10^{22} cm^{-2}$; we find no significant evidence for spectral features (0.5-7.0 keV). Time resolved X-ray spectroscopy shows evidence for evolution in phase in either index, or KT_BB, or some combination thereof as a function of pulse phase. We derive a precise X-ray position for the source and determine its spin period, P=8.68866(30) s. We have detected emission beyond 4 arcsec from the central source and extending beyond 100 arcsec, likely due to dust scattering in the interstellar medium.