• The function of proteins arises from cooperative interactions and rearrangements of their amino acids, which exhibit large-scale dynamical modes. Long-range correlations have also been revealed in protein sequences, and this has motivated the search for physical links between the observed genetic and dynamic cooperativity. We outline here a simplified theory of protein, which relates sequence correlations to physical interactions and to the emergence of mechanical function. Our protein is modeled as a strongly-coupled amino acid network whose interactions and motions are captured by the mechanical propagator, the Green function. The propagator describes how the gene determines the connectivity of the amino acids, and thereby the transmission of forces. Mutations introduce localized perturbations to the propagator which scatter the force field. The emergence of function is manifested by a topological transition when a band of such perturbations divides the protein into subdomains. We find that epistasis -- the interaction among mutations in the gene -- is related to the nonlinearity of the Green function, which can be interpreted as a sum over multiple scattering paths. We apply this mechanical framework to simulations of protein evolution, and observe long-range epistasis which facilitates collective functional modes.
  • A quantum system of N Coulomb charges confined within a harmonic trap is considered over a wide range of densities and temperatures. A recently described construction of an equivalent classical system is applied in order to exploit the rather complete classical description of harmonic confinement via liquid state theory. Here, the effects of quantum mechanics on that representation are described with attention focused on the origin and nature of shell structure. The analysis extends from the classical strong Coulomb coupling conditions of dusty plasmas to the opposite limit of low temperatures and large densities characteristic of "warm, dense matter".
  • Aggregation of like-charged polymers is widely observed in biological and soft matter systems. In many systems, bundles are formed when a short-range attraction of diverse physical origin like charge-bridging, hydrogen-bonding or hydrophobic interaction, overcomes the longer- range charge repulsion. In this Letter, we present a general mechanism of bundle formation in these systems as the breaking of the translational invariance in parallel aligned polymers with competing interactions of this type. We derive a criterion for finite-sized bundle formation as well as for macroscopic phase separation (formation of infinite bundles).
  • Inspired by recent experiments and simulations on pattern formation in biomolecules by optical tweezers, a theoretical description based on reference interaction site model (RISM) integral equation method is developed to calculate the equilibrium density profiles of small polyelectrolytes in an external potential. The formalism is applied to the specific case of a finite number of polyelectrolytes trapped in a harmonic potential. The density profiles of flexible Gaussian and rigid rod-like polyelectrolytes are studied over a range of lengths and numbers of polyelectrolytes in the trap and the Coulomb coupling parameter. For smaller polymers we recover the results for point charges. In the mean field limit the point particles do not form shells for any values of the coupling parameter whereas the longer polymers form a shell at the boundary at moderate coupling. When the inter-polymer cor- relations are included the density profile of the polymers shows sharp shells even at weak coupling. The implications of these results are also discussed.
  • Using Poisson-Boltzmann equation and linear response theory, we derive an effective interaction potential due to a fixed charge distribution in a solution containing polyelectrolytes and point salt. We obtain an expression for the effective potential in terms of static structure factor using the integral equation theories. To demonstrate the theory we apply it to Gaussian and rod-like polyelectrolytes and make connections to earlier theoretical works in some exact limits. We explore the role of both intra and inter polymer correlations, and the geometry of the polymers in the development of attractive regions in the effective potential as well as their effects on the screening lengths.
  • In many biological processes highly charged biomolecules are adsorbed into oppositely charged surfaces of macroions and membranes. They form strongly correlated structures close to the surface which can not be explained by the conventional Poisson-Boltzmann theory. Many of the flexible biomolecules can be described by Gaussian polymers. In this work strong coupling theory is used to study the adsorption of highly charged Gaussian polyelectrolytes. Two cases of adsorptions are considered, when the Gaussian polyelectrolytes are confined a) by one charged wall, and b) between two charged walls. The effects of salt and the geometry of the polymers on their adsorption- depletion transitions in the strong coupling regime are discussed.
  • Strong coupling phenomena, such as the like charged macroions attraction, opposite charged macroions repulsion, charge renormalization or charge inversion, are known to be mediated by multivalent counterions. Most theories treat the counterions as point charges, and describe the system by a single coupling parameter that measures the strength of the Coulomb interactions. In many biological systems, the counterions are highly charged and have finite sizes and can be well-described by polyelectrolytes. The shapes and orientations of these polymer counterions play a major role in the thermodynamics of these systems. In this work we apply a field theoretic description in the strong coupling regime to polyelectrolytes. We work out the special cases of rod-like polymer counterions confined by one and two charged walls respectively. The effects of the geometry of the rod-like counterions and the excluded volume of the walls on the density, pressure and the free energy of the rodlike counterions are discussed.
  • We derive an effective Maxwell-London equation for entangled polymer complex under the topological constraint, borrowing the theoretical framework from the topological field theory. We find that the transverse current flux of the test polymer chain, surrounded with entangled chains, decays exponentially from its average position with finite penetration depth, which is analogous to the magnetic-field decay in a superconductor (SC). Like as the mass acquirement of photons in SC is the origin of the magnetic-field decay, the polymer earns uncrossible intersections along the chain due to the preserved linking number, which restricts the deviation of the transverse polymer current in the normal direction. Interestingly, this picture is well incorporated with the most successful phenomenological theory of the so called tube model, of which researchers have long pursued its microscopic origin. The correspondence of our equation of motion to the tube model claims that the confining tube potential is a consequence of the topological constraint (linking number). The tube radius is attributed to the decay length, and increasing the retracting force at intersections or increasing the number of intersections (linking number), the tube becomes narrow and tighter. It further shows that the probability of the tube leakage decays exponentially with the decay length of tube radius.
  • A recent description of an exact map for the equilibrium structure and thermodynamics of a quantum system onto a corresponding classical system is summarized. Approximate implementations are constructed by pinning exact limits (ideal gas, weak coupling), and illustrated by calculation of pair correlations for the uniform electron gas and shell structure for harmonically confined charges. A wide range of temperatures and densities are addressed in each case. For the electron gas, comparisons are made to recent path integral Monte Carlo simulations (PIMC) showing good agreement. Finally, the relevance for orbital free density functional theory for conditions of warm, dense matter is discussed briefly.
  • A simple, practical model for computing the equilibrium thermodynamics and structure of jellium by classical strong coupling methods is proposed. An effective pair potential and coupling constant are introduced, incorporating the ideal gas, low density, and weak coupling quantum limits. The resulting parameter free, analytic model is illustrated by the calculation of the pair correlation function over a wide range of temperatures and densities via strong coupling classical liquid state theory. The results compare favorably with the first finite temperature restricted path integral Monte Carlo simulations reported recently.
  • A quantum system at equilibrium is represented by a corresponding classical system, chosen to reproduce thermodynamic and structural properties. The motivation is to allow application of classical strong coupling theories and molecular dynamics simulation to quantum systems at strong coupling. The correspondence is made at the level of the grand canonical ensembles for the two systems. An effective temperature, local chemical potential, and pair potential are introduced to define the corresponding classical system. These are determined formally by requiring the equivalence of the grand potentials and their functional derivatives. Practical inversions of these formal definitions are indicated via the integral equations for densities and pair correlation functions of classical liquid theory. Application to the ideal Fermi gas is demonstrated, and the weak coupling form for the pair potential is given. In a companion paper two applications are described: the thermodynamics and structure of uniform jellium over a range of temperatures and densities, and the shell structure of harmonically bound charges.
  • In the preceding paper, the structure and thermodynamics of a given quantum system was represented by a corresponding classical system having an effective temperature, local chemical potential, and pair potential. Here, that formal correspondence is implemented approximately for applications to two quantum systems. The first is the electron gas (jellium) over a range of temperatures and densities. The second is an investigation of quantum effects on shell structure for charges confined by a harmonic potential.
  • A quantum system at equilibrium is represented by a corresponding classical system, chosen to reproduce the thermodynamic and structural properties. The objective is to develop a means for exploiting strong coupling classical methods (e.g., MD, integral equations, DFT) to describe quantum systems. The classical system has an effective temperature, local chemical potential, and pair interaction that are defined by requiring equivalence of the grand potential and its functional derivatives with respect to the external and pair potentials for the classical and quantum systems. Practical inversion of this mapping for the classical properties is effected via the hypernetted chain approximation, leading to representations as functionals of the quantum pair correlation function. As an illustration, the parameters of the classical system are determined approximately such that ideal gas and weak coupling RPA limits are preserved.
  • Semi-classical methods of statistical mechanics can incorporate essential quantum effects by using effective quantum potentials. An ideal Fermi gas interacting with an impurity is represented by a classical fluid with effective electron-electron and electron-impurity quantum potentials. The electron-impurity quantum potential is evaluated at weak coupling, leading to a generalization of the Kelbg potential to include both diffraction and degeneracy effects. The electron-electron quantum potential for exchange effects only is the same as that discussed earlier by others.