• We constrain the stellar population properties of a sample of 52 massive galaxies, with stellar mass $\log M_s/M_\odot>10.5$, over the redshift range 0.5<z<2 by use of observer-frame optical and near-infrared slitless spectra from Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 grisms. The deep exposures allow us to target individual spectra of massive galaxies to F160W=22.5AB. Our fitting approach uses a set of six base models adapted to the redshift and spectral resolution of each observation, and fits the weights of the base models via a MCMC method. The sample comprises a mixed distribution of quiescent (19) and star-forming galaxies (33). Using the cumulative distribution of stellar ages by mass, we define a "quenching timescale" that is found to correlate with stellar mass. The other population parameters, aside from metallicity, do not show such a strong correlation, although all display the characteristic segregation between quiescent and star-forming populations. Radial colour gradients within each galaxy are also explored, finding a wider scatter in the star-forming subsample, but no conclusive trend with respect to the population parameters. Environment is also studied, with at most a subtle effect towards older ages in high-density environments.
  • The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) was the top ranked large space mission in the 2010 New Worlds, New Horizons decadal survey, and it was formed by merging the science programs of 3 different mission concepts, including the Microlensing Planet Finder (MPF) concept (Bennett \etal\ 2010). The WFIRST science program (Spergel \etal\ 2015) consists of a general observer program, a wavefront controlled technology program, and two targeted science programs: a program to study dark energy, and a statistical census of exoplanets with a microlensing survey, which uses nearly one quarter of WFIRST's observing time in the current design reference mission. The New Worlds, New Horizons (decadal survey) midterm assessment summarizes the science case for the WFIRST exoplanet microlensing survey with this statement: "WFIRST's microlensing census of planets beyond 1 AU will perfectly complement Kepler's census of compact systems, and WFIRST will also be able to detect free-floating planets unbound from their parent stars\rlap."
  • We present an empirical parameterization of the [NII]/H$\alpha$ flux ratio as a function of stellar mass and redshift valid at 0 < z < 2.7 and 8.5 < log(M) < 11.0. This description can easily be applied to (i) simulations for modeling [NII]$\lambda6584$ line emission, (ii) deblend [NII] and H$\alpha$ in current low-resolution grism and narrow-band observations to derive intrinsic H$\alpha$ fluxes, and (iii) to reliably forecast the number counts of H$\alpha$ emission-line galaxies for future surveys, such as those planned for Euclid and the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST). Our model combines the evolution of the locus on the Baldwin, Phillips & Terlevich (BPT) diagram measured in spectroscopic data out to z = 2.5 with the strong dependence of [NII]/H$\alpha$ on stellar mass and [OIII]/H$\beta$ observed in local galaxy samples. We find large variations in the [NII]/H$\alpha$ flux ratio at a fixed redshift due to its dependency on stellar mass; hence, the assumption of a constant [NII] flux contamination fraction can lead to a significant under- or overestimate of H$\alpha$ luminosities. Specifically, measurements of the intrinsic H$\alpha$ luminosity function derived from current low-resolution grism spectroscopy assuming a constant 29% contamination of [NII] can be overestimated by factors of ~8 at log(L) > 43.0 for galaxies at redshifts z = 1.5. This has implications for the prediction of H$\alpha$ emitters for Euclid and WFIRST. We also study the impact of blended H$\alpha$ and [NII] on the accuracy of measured spectroscopic redshifts.
  • We improve the accuracy of photometric redshifts by including low-resolution spectral data from the G102 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope, which assists in redshift determination by further constraining the shape of the broadband Spectral Energy Disribution (SED) and identifying spectral features. The photometry used in the redshift fits includes near-IR photometry from FIGS+CANDELS, as well as optical data from ground-based surveys and HST ACS, and mid-IR data from Spitzer. We calculated the redshifts through the comparison of measured photometry with template galaxy models, using the EAZY photometric redshift code. For objects with F105W $< 26.5$ AB mag with a redshift range of $0 < z < 6$, we find a typical error of $\Delta z = 0.03 * (1+z)$ for the purely photometric redshifts; with the addition of FIGS spectra, these become $\Delta z = 0.02 * (1+z)$, an improvement of 50\%. Addition of grism data also reduces the outlier rate from 8\% to 7\% across all fields. With the more-accurate spectrophotometric redshifts (SPZs), we searched the FIGS fields for galaxy overdensities. We identified 24 overdensities across the 4 fields. The strongest overdensity, matching a spectroscopically identified cluster at $z=0.85$, has 28 potential member galaxies, of which 8 have previous spectroscopic confirmation, and features a corresponding X-ray signal. Another corresponding to a cluster at $z=1.84$ has 22 members, 18 of which are spectroscopically confirmed. Additionally, we find 4 overdensities that are detected at an equal or higher significance in at least one metric to the two confirmed clusters.
  • ATLAS (Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy) Probe is a concept for a NASA probe-class space mission, the spectroscopic follow-up to WFIRST, multiplexing its scientific return by obtaining deep 1 to 4 micron slit spectroscopy for ~90% of all galaxies imaged by the ~2200 sq deg WFIRST High Latitude Survey at z > 0.5. ATLAS spectroscopy will measure accurate and precise redshifts for ~300M galaxies out to z < 7, and deliver spectra that enable a wide range of diagnostic studies of the physical properties of galaxies over most of cosmic history. ATLAS and WFIRST together will produce a 3D map of the Universe with ~Mpc resolution in redshift space. ATLAS will: (1) Revolutionize galaxy evolution studies by tracing the relation between galaxies and dark matter from galaxy groups to cosmic voids and filaments, from the epoch of reionization through the peak era of galaxy assembly; (2) Open a new window into the dark Universe by weighing the dark matter filaments using 3D weak lensing with spectroscopic redshifts, and obtaining definitive measurements of dark energy and modification of General Relativity using galaxy clustering; (3) Probe the Milky Way's dust-enshrouded regions, reaching the far side of our Galaxy; and (4) Explore the formation history of the outer Solar System by characterizing Kuiper Belt Objects. ATLAS is a 1.5m telescope with a field of view (FoV) of 0.4 sq deg, and uses Digital Micro-mirror Devices (DMDs) as slit selectors. It has a spectroscopic resolution of R = 600, a wavelength range of 1-4 microns, and a spectroscopic multiplex factor ~5,000-10,000. ATLAS is designed to fit within the NASA probe-class mission cost envelope; it has a single instrument, a telescope aperture that allows for a lighter launch vehicle, and mature technology (DMDs can reach TRL 6 within 2 years). ATLAS will lead to transformative science over the entire range of astrophysics.
  • Searching for extreme emission line galaxies allows us to find low-mass metal-poor galaxies that are good analogs of high redshift Ly$\alpha$ emitting galaxies. These low-mass extreme emission line galaxies are also potential Lyman-continuum leakers. Finding them at very low redshifts ($z\lesssim0.05$) allows us to be sensitive to even lower stellar masses and metallicities. We report on a sample of extreme emission line galaxies at $z\lesssim0.05$ (blueberry galaxies). We selected them from SDSS broadband images on the basis of their broad band colors, and studied their properties with MMT spectroscopy. From the whole SDSS DR12 photometric catalog, we found 51 photometric candidates. We spectroscopically confirm 40 as blueberry galaxies. (An additional 7 candidates are contaminants, and 4 remain without spectra.) These blueberries are dwarf starburst galaxies with very small sizes ($< 1\hbox{kpc}$), and very high ionization ([OIII]/[OII]$\sim10-60$). They also have some of the lowest stellar masses ($\log(\hbox{M}/\hbox{M}_{\odot})\sim6.5-7.5$) and lowest metallicities ($7.1<12+\log(\hbox{O/H})<7.8$) starburst galaxies. Thus they are small counterparts to green peas and high redshift Ly$\alpha$ emitting galaxies.
  • Narrowband imaging is a highly successful approach for finding large numbers of high redshift Lya emitting galaxies (LAEs) up to z~6.6. However, at z>~7 there are as yet only 3 narrowband selected LAEs with spectroscopic confirmations (two at z~6.9-7.0, one at z~7.3), which hinders extensive studies on cosmic reionization and galaxy evolution at this key epoch. We have selected 23 candidate z~6.9 LAEs in COSMOS field with the large area narrowband survey LAGER (Lyman-Alpha Galaxies at the End of Reionization). In this work we present spectroscopic followup observations of 12 candidates using IMACS on Magellan. For 9 of these, the observations are sufficiently deep to detect the expected lines. Lya emission lines are identified in six sources (yielding a success rate of 2/3), including 3 luminous LAEs with Lya luminosities of L(Lya) ~ 10^{43.5} erg/s, the highest among known spectroscopically confirmed galaxies at >~7.0. This triples the sample size of spectroscopically confirmed narrowband selected LAEs at z>~7, and confirms the bright end bump in the Lya luminosity function we previously derived based on the photometric sample, supporting a patchy reionization scenario. Two luminous LAEs appear physically linked with projected distance of 1.1 pMpc and velocity difference of ~ 170 km/s. They likely sit in a common ionized bubble produced by themselves or with close neighbors, which reduces the IGM attenuation of Lya. A tentative narrow NV${\lambda}$1240 line is seen in one source, hinting at activity of a central massive black hole with metal rich line emitting gas.
  • We studied Lyman-$\alpha$ (Ly$\alpha$) escape in a statistical sample of 43 Green Peas with HST/COS Ly$\alpha$ spectra. Green Peas are nearby star-forming galaxies with strong [OIII]$\lambda$5007 emission lines. Our sample is four times larger than the previous sample and covers a much more complete range of Green Pea properties. We found that about 2/3 of Green Peas are strong Ly$\alpha$ line emitters with rest-frame Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width $>20$ \AA. The Ly$\alpha$ profiles of Green Peas are diverse. The Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction, defined as the ratio of observed Ly$\alpha$ flux to intrinsic Ly$\alpha$ flux, shows anti-correlations with a few Ly$\alpha$ kinematic features -- both the blue peak and red peak velocities, the peak separations, and FWHM of the red portion of the Ly$\alpha$ profile. Using properties measured from SDSS optical spectra, we found many correlations -- Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction generally increases at lower dust reddening, lower metallicity, lower stellar mass, and higher [OIII]/[OII] ratio. We fit their Ly$\alpha$ profiles with the HI shell radiative transfer model and found Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction anti-correlates with the best-fit $N_{HI}$. Finally, we fit an empirical linear relation to predict Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction from the dust extinction and Ly$\alpha$ red peak velocity. The standard deviation of this relation is about 0.3 dex. This relation can be used to isolate the effect of IGM scatterings from Ly$\alpha$ escape and to probe the IGM optical depth along the line of sight of each $z>7$ Ly$\alpha$ emission line galaxy in the JWST era.
  • Green Peas are nearby analogs of high-redshift Ly$\alpha$-emitting galaxies. To probe their Ly$\alpha$ escape, we study the spatial profiles of Ly$\alpha$ and UV continuum emission of 24 Green Pea galaxies using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We extract the spatial profiles of Ly$\alpha$ emission from their 2D COS spectra, and of UV continuum from both the 2D spectra and NUV images. The Ly$\alpha$ emission shows more extended spatial profiles than the UV continuum in most Green Peas. The deconvolved Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM) of the Ly$\alpha$ spatial profile is about 2 to 4 times that of the UV continuum in most cases. Since Green Peas are analogs of high-z LAEs, it suggests that most high-z LAEs likely have larger Ly$\alpha$ sizes than UV sizes. We also compare the spatial profiles of Ly$\alpha$ photons at blueshifted and redshifted velocities in eight Green Peas with sufficient data quality, and find the blue wing of the Ly$\alpha$ line has a larger spatial extent than the red wing in four Green Peas with comparatively weak blue Ly$\alpha$ line wings. We show that Green Peas and MUSE $z=3-6$ LAEs have similar Ly$\alpha$ and UV continuum sizes, which probably suggests starbursts in both low-z and high-z LAEs drive similar gas outflows illuminated by Ly$\alpha$ light. Five Lyman continuum (LyC) leakers in this sample have similar Ly$\alpha$ to UV continuum size ratios (~1.4-4.3) to the other Green Peas, indicating their LyC emission escape through ionized holes in the interstellar medium.
  • The Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS) is a deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3/IR (Wide Field Camera 3 Infrared) slitless spectroscopic survey of four deep fields. Two fields are located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North (GOODS-N) area and two fields are located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) area. One of the southern fields selected is the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. Each of these four fields were observed using the WFC3/G102 grism (0.8$\mu m$-1.15$\mu m$ continuous coverage) with a total exposure time of 40 orbits (~ 100 kilo-seconds) per field. This reaches a 3 sigma continuum depth of ~26 AB magnitudes and probes emission lines to $\approx 10^{-17}\ erg\ s^{-1} \ cm^{-2}$. This paper details the four FIGS fields and the overall observational strategy of the project. A detailed description of the Simulation Based Extraction (SBE) method used to extract and combine over 10000 spectra of over 2000 distinct sources brighter than m_F105W=26.5 mag is provided. High fidelity simulations of the observations is shown to significantly improve the background subtraction process, the spectral contamination estimates, and the final flux calibration. This allows for the combination of multiple spectra to produce a final high quality, deep, 1D-spectra for each object in the survey.
  • We present the first results from the ongoing LAGER project (Lyman Alpha Galaxies in the Epoch of Reionization), which is the largest narrowband survey for $z \sim$ 7 galaxies to date. Using a specially built narrowband filter NB964 for the superb large-area Dark-Energy Camera (DECam) on the NOAO/CTIO 4m Blanco telescope, LAGER has collected 34 hours NB964 narrowband imaging data in the 3 deg$^2$ COSMOS field. We have identified 23 Lyman Alpha Emitter (LAE) candidates at $z$ = 6.9 in the central 2-deg$^2$ region, where DECam and public COSMOS multi-band images exist. The resulting luminosity function can be described as a Schechter function modified by a significant excess at the bright end (4 galaxies with $L_{Ly\alpha} \sim $ 10$^{43.4\pm0.2}$ erg s$^{-1}$). The number density at $L_{Ly\alpha}\sim$ 10$^{43.4\pm0.2}$ erg s$^{-1}$ is little changed from z= 6.6, while at fainter $L_{Ly\alpha}$ it is substantially reduced. Overall, we see a fourfold reduction in Ly$\alpha$ luminosity density from $z$ = 5.7 to 6.9. Combined with a more modest evolution of the continuum UV luminosity density, this suggests a factor of $\sim 3$ suppression of Ly$\alpha$ by radiative transfer through the $z \sim$ 7 intergalactic medium (IGM). It indicates an IGM neutral fraction $x_{HI}$ $\sim$ 0.4--0.6 (assuming Ly$\alpha$ velocity offsets of 100-200 km s$^{-1}$). The changing shape of the Ly$\alpha$ luminosity function between $z\lesssim 6.6$ and $z=6.9$ supports the hypothesis of ionized bubbles in a patchy reionization at $z\sim$ 7.
  • We analyze archival Ly$\alpha$ spectra of 12 "Green Pea" galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, model their Ly$\alpha$ profiles with radiative transfer models, and explore the dependence of Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction on various properties. Green Pea galaxies are nearby compact starburst galaxies with [OIII]$\lambda$5007 equivalent widths of hundreds of \AA. All 12 Green Pea galaxies in our sample show Ly$\alpha$ lines in emission, with a Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width distribution similar to high redshift Ly$\alpha$ emitters. Combining the optical and UV spectra of Green Pea galaxies, we estimate their Ly$\alpha$ escape fractions and find correlations between Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction and kinematic features of Ly$\alpha$ profiles. The escape fraction of Ly$\alpha$ in these galaxies ranges from 1.4% to 67%. We also find that the Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction depends strongly on metallicity and moderately on dust extinction. We compare their high-quality Ly$\alpha$ profiles with single HI shell radiative transfer models and find that the Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction anti-correlates with the derived HI column densities. Single shell models fit most Ly$\alpha$ profiles well, but not the ones with highest escape fractions of Ly$\alpha$. Our results suggest that low HI column density and low metallicity are essential for Ly$\alpha$ escape, and make a galaxy a Ly$\alpha$ emitter.
  • We present the results from a stellar population modeling analysis of a sample of 162 z=4.5, and 14 z=5.7 Lyman alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) in the Bootes field, using deep Spitzer/IRAC data at 3.6 and 4.5 um from the Spitzer Lyman Alpha Survey, along with Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS and WFC3 imaging at 1.1 and 1.6 um for a subset of the LAEs. This represents one of the largest samples of high-redshift LAEs imaged with Spitzer IRAC. We find that 30/162 (19%) of the z=4.5 LAEs and 9/14 (64%) of the z=5.7 LAEs are detected at >3-sigma in at least one IRAC band. Individual z=4.5 IRAC-detected LAEs have a large range of stellar mass, from 5x10^8 to 10^11 Msol. One-third of the IRAC-detected LAEs have older stellar population ages of 100 Myr - 1 Gyr, while the remainder have ages < 100 Myr. A stacking analysis of IRAC-undetected LAEs shows this population to be primarily low mass (8 -- 20 x 10^8 Msol) and young (64 - 570 Myr). We find a correlation between stellar mass and the dust-corrected ultraviolet-based star-formation rate (SFR) similar to that at lower redshifts, in that higher mass galaxies exhibit higher SFRs. However, the z=4.5 LAE correlation is elevated 4-5 times in SFR compared to continuum-selected galaxies at similar redshifts. The exception is the most massive LAEs which have SFRs similar to galaxies at lower redshifts suggesting that they may represent a different population of galaxies than the traditional lower-mass LAEs, perhaps with a different mechanism promoting Lyman alpha photon escape.
  • We report on two regularly rotating galaxies at redshift z=2, using high resolution spectra of the bright [CII] 158 micron emission line from the HIFI instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. Both SDSS090122.37+181432.3 ("S0901") and SDSS J120602.09+514229.5 ("the Clone") are strongly lensed and show the double-horned line profile that is typical of rotating gas disks. Using a parametric disk model to fit the emission line profiles, we find that S0901 has a rotation speed v sin(i) = 120 +/- 7 km/s and gas velocity dispersion sigma < 23 km/s. The best fitting model for the Clone is a rotationally supported disk having v sin(i) = 79 +/- 11 km/s and sigma < 4km/s. However the Clone is also consistent with a family of dispersion-dominated models having sigma = 92 +/- 20 km/s. Our results showcase the potential of the [CII] line as a kinematic probe of high redshift galaxy dynamics: [CII] is bright; accessible to heterodyne receivers with exquisite velocity resolution; and traces dense star-forming interstellar gas. Future [CII] line observations with ALMA would offer the further advantage of spatial resolution, allowing a clearer separation between rotation and velocity dispersion.
  • We present a sample of 33 spectroscopically confirmed z ~ 3.1 Ly$\alpha$-emitting galaxies (LAEs) in the Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. This paper details the narrow-band survey we conducted to detect the LAE sample, the optical spectroscopy we performed to confirm the nature of these LAEs, and a new near-infrared spectroscopic detection of the [O III] 5007 \AA\ line in one of these LAEs. This detection is in addition to two [O III] detections in two z ~ 3.1 LAEs we have reported on previously (McLinden et al 2011). The bulk of the paper then presents detailed constraints on the physical characteristics of the entire LAE sample from spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. These characteristics include mass, age, star-formation history, dust content, and metallicity. We also detail an approach to account for nebular emission lines in the SED fitting process - wherein our models predict the strength of the [O III] line in an LAE spectrum. We are able to study the success of this prediction because we can compare the model predictions to our actual near-infrared observations both in galaxies that have [O III] detections and those that yielded non-detections. We find a median stellar mass of 6.9 $\times$ 10$^8$ M$_{\odot}$ and a median star formation rate weighted stellar population age of 4.5 $\times$ 10$^6$ yr. In addition to SED fitting, we quantify the velocity offset between the [O III] and Ly$\alpha$ lines in the galaxy with the new [O III] detection, finding that the Ly$\alpha$ line is shifted 52 km s$^{-1}$ redwards of the [O III] line, which defines the systemic velocity of the galaxy.
  • Using Ly{\alpha} emission line as a tracer of high redshift star forming galaxies, hundreds of Ly{\alpha} emission line galaxies (LAEs) at z > 5 have been detected. These LAEs are considered to be low mass young galaxies, critical to the reionization of the universe and the metal enrichment of circumgalactic medium (CGM) and intergalactic medium (IGM). It is assumed that outflows in LAEs can help ionizing photons and Ly{\alpha} photons escape out of galaxies. However we still know little about the outflows in high redshifts LAEs due to observational difficulties, especially at redshift > 5. Models of Ly{\alpha} radiative transfer predict asymmetric Ly{\alpha} line profiles with broad red wing in LAEs with outflows. Here we report a z ~ 5.7 Ly{\alpha} emission line with a broad red wing extending to > 1000 km/s relative to the peak of Ly{\alpha} line, which has been detected in only a couple of z > 5 LAEs till now. If the broad red wing is ascribed to gas outflow instead of AGN activity, the outflow velocity could be larger than the escape velocity (~ 500 km/s) of typical halo mass of z ~ 5.7 LAEs, being consistent with the picture that outflows in LAEs disperse metals to CGM and IGM.
  • Motivated by recent observations of galaxies dominated by emission lines, which show evidence of being metal poor with young stellar populations, we present calculations of multiple model grids with a range of abundances, ionization parameters, and stellar ages, finding that the predicted spectral line diagnostics are heavily dependent on all three parameters. These new model grids extend the ionization parameter to larger values than typically explored. We compare these model predictions with previous observations of such objects, including two new Lyman-$\alpha$ emitting galaxies (LAE) that we have observed. Our models give improved constraints on the metallicity and ionization parameter of these previously studied objects, as we are now able to consider high ionization parameter models. However, similar to previous work, these models have difficulty predicting large line diagnostics for high ionization potential species, requiring future work refining the modelling of FUV photons. Our model grids are also able to constrain the metallicity and ionization parameter of our LAEs, and give constraints on their Ly$\alpha$ escape fractions, all of which are consistent with recent lower redshift studies of LAEs.
  • In the absence of spectra, fitting template model spectra to observed photometric fluxes, known as Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) fitting, has become the workhorse for identifying high-z galaxies. In this paper, we present an analysis of the most recent and possibly most distant galaxies discovered in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field using a more robust method of redshift estimation based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo fitting (MCMC), rather than relying on the redshift of "best fit" models obtained using common chi^2 minimization techniques. The advantage of MCMC fitting is the ability to accurately estimate the probability density function of the redshift, as well as any other input model parameters, allowing us to derive accurate credible intervals by properly marginalizing over all other input model parameters. We apply our method to 13 recently identified sources and show that, despite claims based on chi^2 minimization, none of these sources can be securely ruled out as low redshift interlopers given the low signal-to-noise of currently available observations. We estimate that there is an average probability of 21% that these sources are low redshift interlopers.
  • We present a full analysis of the Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) slitess grism spectroscopic data obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on HST. PEARS covers fields within both the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) North and South fields, making it ideal as a random survey of galaxies, as well as the availability of a wide variety of ancillary observations to support the spectroscopic results. Using the PEARS data we are able to identify star forming galaxies within the redshift volume 0< z<1.5. Star forming regions in the PEARS survey are pinpointed independently of the host galaxy. This method allows us to detect the presence of multiple emission line regions (ELRs) within a single galaxy. 1162 Ha, [OIII] and/or [OII] emission lines have been identified in the PEARS sample of ~906 galaxies down to a limiting flux of ~1e-18 erg/s/cm^2. The ELRs have also been compared to the properties of the host galaxy, including morphology, luminosity, and mass. From this analysis we find three key results: 1) The computed line luminosities show evidence of a flattening in the luminosity function with increasing redshift; 2) The star forming systems show evidence of disturbed morphologies, with star formation occurring predominantly within one effective (half-light) radius. However, the morphologies show no correlation with host stellar mass; and 3) The number density of star forming galaxies with M_* > 1e9} M_sun decreases by an order of magnitude at z<0.5 relative to the number at 0.5<z<0.9 in support of the argument for galaxy downsizing.
  • We present observations of a luminous galaxy at redshift z=6.573 --- the end of the reioinization epoch --- which has been spectroscopically confirmed twice. The first spectroscopic confirmation comes from slitless HST ACS grism spectra from the PEARS survey (Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically), which show a dramatic continuum break in the spectrum at restframe 1216 A wavelength. The second confirmation is done with Keck + DEIMOS. The continuum is not clearly detected with ground-based spectra, but high wavelength resolution enables the Lyman alpha emission line profile to be determined. We compare the line profile to composite line profiles at redshift z=4.5. The Lyman alpha line profile shows no signature of a damping wing attenuation, confirming that the intergalactic gas is ionized at redshift z=6.57. Spectra of Lyman breaks at yet higher redshifts will be possible using comparably deep observations with IR-sensitive grisms, even at redshifts where Lyman alpha is too attenuated by the neutral IGM to be detectable using traditional spectroscopy from the ground.
  • We present a spectroscopically confirmed sample of Lyman alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) at z ~ 4.5 in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), which we combine with a sample of z ~ 4.5 LAEs from the Large Area Lyman Alpha (LALA) survey to build a unified Lya luminosity function (LF). We spectroscopically observed 64 candidate LAEs in the ECDFS, confirming 46 objects as z~4.5 LAEs. We did not detect significant flux from neither C_iv 1549\AA\ nor the He_ii 1640\AA\ emission in individual LAE spectra, even with a coadded spectrum. With the coadded line ratio of He_ii to Lya constraining the Population III star formation rate (SFR) to be <0.3% of the total SFR, and <1.25% of the observed SFR (both at the 2-$\sigma$ level). Only one LAE was detected in both the X-ray and radio, while the other objects remained undetected, even when stacked. The Lya LF in our two deepest narrowband filters in the ECDFS differ at >2$\sigma$ significance, and the product $L^*\Phi^*$ differs by a factor of >3. Similar LF differences have been used to infer evolution in the neutral gas fraction in the intergalactic medium at z>6, yet here the difference is likely due to cosmic variance, given that the two samples are from adjoining line-of-sight volumes. Combining our new sample of LAEs with those from previous LALA narrowband surveys at z = 4.5, we obtain one of the best measured Lya LFs to date of L* = 42.83 $\pm$ 0.06 and $\Phi^*$ = -3.48 $\pm$ 0.09. We compare our new LF to others from the literature to study the evolution of the Lya luminosity density at 0 < z < 7. We find tentative evidence for evolution in the product $L^* \Phi^*$, which approximately tracks the cosmic SFR density, but since field-to-field and survey-to-survey variations are in some cases as large as the possible evolution, some caution is needed in interpreting this trend.
  • We present the first dynamical mass measurements for Lyman alpha galaxies at high redshift, based on velocity dispersion measurements from rest-frame optical emission lines and size measurements from HST imaging, for a sample of nine galaxies drawn from four surveys. These measurements enable us to study the nature of Lyman alpha galaxies in the context of galaxy scaling relations. The resulting dynamical masses range from 1e9 to 1e10 solar masses. We also fit stellar population models to our sample, and use them to plot the Lyman alpha sample on a stellar mass vs. line width relation. Overall, the Lyman alpha galaxies follow well the scaling relation established by observing star forming galaxies at lower redshift (and without regard for Lyman alpha emission), though in 1/3 of the Lyman alpha galaxies, lower-mass fits are also acceptable. In all cases, the dynamical masses agree with established stellarmass-linewidth relation. Using the dynamical masses as an upper limit on gas mass, we show that Lyman alpha galaxies resemble starbursts (rather than "normal" galaxies) in the relation between gas mass surface density and star formation activity, in spite of relatively modest star formation rates. Finally, we examine the mass densities of these galaxies, and show that their future evolution likely requires dissipational ("wet") merging. In short, we find that Lyman alpha galaxies are low mass cousins of larger starbursts.
  • We present spectroscopic measurements of the [OIII] emission line from two subregions of strong Lyman-alpha emission in a radio-quiet Lyman-alpha blob (LAB). The blob under study is LAB1 (Steidel et al. 2000) at z ~ 3.1, and the [OIII] detections are from the two Lyman break galaxies embedded in the blob halo. The [OIII] measurements were made with LUCIFER on the 8.4m Large Binocular Telescope and NIRSPEC on 10m Keck Telescope. Comparing the redshift of the [OIII] measurements to Lyman-alpha redshifts from SAURON (Weijmans et al. 2010) allows us to take a step towards understanding the kinematics of the gas in the blob. Using both LUCIFER and NIRSPEC we find velocity offsets between the [OIII] and Lyman-alpha redshifts that are modestly negative or consistent with 0 km/s in both subregions studied (ranging from -72 +/- 42 -- +6 +/- 33 km/s). A negative offset means Lyman-alpha is blueshifted with respect to [OIII], a positive offset then implies Lyman-alpha is redshifted with respect to [OIII]. These results may imply that outflows are not primarily responsible for Lyman alpha escape in this LAB, since outflows are generally expected to produce a positive velocity offset (McLinden et al. 2011). In addition, we present an [OIII] line flux upper limit on a third region of LAB1, a region that is unassociated with any underlying galaxy. We find that the [OIII] upper limit from the galaxy-unassociated region of the blob is at least 1.4 -- 2.5 times fainter than the [OIII] flux from one of the LBG-associated regions and has an [OIII] to Lyman-alpha ratio measured at least 1.9 -- 3.4 times smaller than the same ratio measured from one of the LBGs.
  • We discuss scientific, technical and programmatic issues related to the use of an NRO 2.4m telescope for the WFIRST initiative of the 2010 Decadal Survey. We show that this implementation of WFIRST, which we call "NEW WFIRST," would achieve the goals of the NWNH Decadal Survey for the WFIRST core programs of Dark Energy and Microlensing Planet Finding, with the crucial benefit of deeper and/or wider near-IR surveys for GO science and a potentially Hubble-like Guest Observer program. NEW WFIRST could also include a coronagraphic imager for direct detection of dust disks and planets around neighboring stars, a high-priority science and technology precursor for future ambitious programs to image Earth-like planets around neighboring stars.
  • (Abridged) We present here a detailed analysis of the star formation history (SFH) of FW4871, a massive galaxy at z=1.893+-0.002. We compare rest-frame optical and NUV slitless grism spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope with a large set of composite stellar populations to constrain the underlying star formation history. Even though the morphology features prominent tidal tails, indicative of a recent merger, there is no sign of on-going star formation within an aperture encircling one effective radius, which corresponds to a physical extent of 2.6 kpc. A model assuming truncation of an otherwise constant SFH gives a formation epoch zF~10, with a truncation after 2.7 Gyr, giving a mass-weighted age of 1.5 Gyr and a stellar mass of 0.8-3E11Msun, implying star formation rates of 30-110 Msun/yr. A more complex model including a recent burst of star formation places the age of the youngest component at 145 Myr, with a mass contribution lower than 20%, and a maximum amount of dust reddening of E(B-V)<0.4 mag (95% confidence levels). This low level of dust reddening is consistent with the low emission observed at 24 micron, corresponding to rest-frame 8 micron, where PAH emission should contribute significantly if a strong formation episode were present. The colour profile of FW4871 does not suggest a significant radial trend in the properties of the stellar populations out to 3Re. We suggest that the recent merger that formed FW4871 is responsible for the quenching of its star formation.