• The physical process whereby a carbon--oxygen white dwarf explodes as a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) remains highly uncertain. The degree of neutronization in SN Ia ejecta holds clues to this process because it depends on the mass and the metallicity of the stellar progenitor, and on the thermodynamic history prior to the explosion. We report on a new method to determine ejecta neutronization using Ca and S lines in the X-ray spectra of Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs). Applying this method to \textit{Suzaku} data of Tycho, Kepler, 3C 397 and G337.2$-$0.7 in the Milky Way, and N103B in the Large Magellanic Cloud, we find that the neutronization of the ejecta in N103B is comparable to that of Tycho and Kepler, which suggests that progenitor metallicity is not the only source of neutronization in SNe Ia. We then use a grid of SN Ia explosion models to infer the metallicities of the stellar progenitors of our SNRs. The implied metallicities of 3C 397, G337.2$-$0.7, and N103B are major outliers compared to the local stellar metallicity distribution functions, indicating that progenitor metallicity can be ruled out as the origin of neutronization for these SNRs. Although the relationship between ejecta neutronization and equivalent progenitor metallicity is subject to uncertainties stemming from the $^{12}$C$\,$+$^{16}$O reaction rate, which affects the Ca/S mass ratio, our main results are not sensitive to these details.
  • The supernova remnant (SNR) N49B in the Large Magellanic Cloud is a peculiar example of a core-collapse SNR to show the shocked metal-rich ejecta enriched only in Mg without evidence for a similar overabundance in O and Ne. Based on archival Chandra data we present results from our extensive spatially-resolved spectral analysis of N49B. We find that the Mg-rich ejecta gas extends from the central regions of the SNR out to the southeastern outermost boundary of the SNR. This elongated feature shows an overabundance for Mg similar to that of the main ejecta region at the SNR center, and its electron temperature appears to be higher than the central main ejecta gas. We estimate that the Mg mass in this southeastern elongated ejecta feature is ~10% of the total Mg ejecta mass. Our estimated lower limit of >0.1 M_sun on the total mass of the Mg-rich ejecta confirms the previously-suggested large mass for the progenitor star (M > ~25 M_sun). We entertain scenarios of an SNR expanding into a non-uniform medium and an energetic jet-driven supernova in an attempt to interpret these results. However, with the current results, the origins of the extended Mg-rich ejecta and the Mg-only-rich nature of the overall metal-rich ejecta in this SNR remain elusive.
  • X-ray observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) allow us to investigate the chemical inhomogeneity of ejecta, offering unique insight into the nucleosynthesis in supernova explosions. Here we present detailed imaging and spectroscopic studies of the "Fe knot" located along the eastern rim of the Type Ia SNR Tycho (SN 1572) using Suzaku and Chandra long-exposure data. Surprisingly, the Suzaku spectrum of this knot shows no emission from Cr, Mn, or Ni, which is unusual for the Fe-rich regions in this SNR. Within the framework of the canonical delayed-detonation models for SN Ia, the observed mass ratios M_Cr/M_Fe < 0.023, M_Mn/M_Fe < 0.012, and M_Ni/M_Fe < 0.029 (at 90% confidence) can only be achieved for a peak temperature of (5.3-5.7) x 10^9 K and a neutron excess of < 2.0 x 10^-3. These constraints rule out the deep, dense core of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf as the origin of the Fe knot, and favors either incomplete Si burning or the alpha-rich freeze-out regime, probably close to their boundary. An explosive He burning regime is a possible alternative, although this hypothesis is in conflict with the main properties of this SNR.
  • Updated imaging and photometric results from Chandra observations of SN 1987A, covering the last 16 years, are presented. We find that the 0.5-2 keV light curve has remained constant at ~8x10^-12 erg s^-1 cm^-2 since 9500 days, with the 3-8 keV light curve continuing to increase until at least 10000 days. The expansion rate of the ring is found to be energy dependent, such that after day 6000 the ring expands faster in the 2-10 keV band than it does at energies <2 keV. Images show a reversal of the east-west asymmetry between 7000 and 8000 days after the explosion. The latest images suggest the southeastern side of the equatorial ring is beginning to fade. Consistent with the latest optical and infrared results, our Chandra analysis indicates the blast wave is now leaving the dense equatorial ring, which marks the beginning of a major change in the evolutionary phase of the supernova remnant 1987A.
  • We report on the results from our measurements of the interstellar medium (ISM) abundances for the elements O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We used the archival Chandra data for sixteen supernova remnants (SNRs) in the LMC (0453--68.5, DEM L71, N23, 0519--69.0, N49B, N132D, N49, N206, 0534--69.9, DEM L238, N63A, Honeycomb, N157B, 0540--69.3, DEM L316B, and 0548--70.4). Our results represent LMC abundance measurements based on the modern Chandra data. We place tight constraints on our measured elemental abundances and find lower abundances than previous measurements by Hughes et al. (1998) (by a factor of ~2 on average except for Si) who utilized similar methods based on a smaller sample of ASCA data of SNRs in the LMC. We discuss origins of the discrepancy between our Chandra and the previous ASCA measurements. We also discuss our results in comparisons with the LMC abundance measurements in literatures.
  • Spitzer observations of SN 1987A have now spanned more than a decade. Since day ~4,000, mid-infrared (mid-IR) emission has been dominated by that from shock-heated dust in the equatorial ring (ER). From 6,000 to 8,000 days after the explosion, Spitzer observations included broadband photometry at 3.6 - 24 micron, and low and moderate resolution spectroscopy at 5 - 35 micron. Here we present later Spitzer observations, through day 10,377, which include only the broadband measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 micron. These data show that the 3.6 and 4.5 micron brightness has clearly begun to fade after day ~8,500, and no longer tracks the X-ray emission as well as it did at earlier epochs. This can be explained by the destruction of the dust in the ER on time scales shorter than the cooling time for the shocked gas. We find that the evolution of the late time IR emission is also similar to the now fading optical emission. We provide the complete record of the IR emission lines, as seen by Spitzer prior to day 8,000. The past evolution of the gas as seen by the IR emission lines seems largely consistent with the optical emission, although the IR [Fe II] and [Si II] lines show different, peculiar velocity structures.
  • We analyze three Chandra observations, with a combined exposure time of 99 ks, of the Galactic supernova remnant RCW 103, a young supernova remnant, previously with no clear detection of metal-rich ejecta. Based on our imaging and spectral analyses of these deep Chandra data, we find evidence for metal-rich ejecta emission scattered throughout the remnant. X-ray emission from the shocked ejecta is generally weak, and the shocked circumstellar medium (CSM) is a largely dominant component across the entire remnant. The CSM component shows abundances of ~0.5 solar, while Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe abundances of the ejecta are up to a few times solar. Comparison of these ejecta abundances with yields from supernova nucleosynthesis models suggests, together with the existence of a central neutron star, a progenitor mass of ~18-20 M$_\odot$, though the Fe/Si ratios are larger than predicted. The shocked CSM emission suggests a progenitor with high mass-loss rate and subsolar metallicity.
  • We report on the results from the analysis of our 114 ks Chandra HETGS observation of the Galactic core-collapse supernova remnant G292.0+1.8. To probe the 3D structure of the clumpy X-ray emitting ejecta material in this remnant, we measured Doppler shifts in emission lines from metal-rich ejecta knots projected at different radial distances from the expansion center. We estimate radial velocities of ejecta knots in the range of -2300 <~ v_r <~ 1400 km s^-1. The distribution of ejecta knots in velocity vs. projected-radius space suggests an expanding ejecta shell with a projected angular thickness of ~90" (corresponding to ~3 pc at d = 6 kpc). Based on this geometrical distribution of the ejecta knots, we estimate the location of the reverse shock approximately at the distance of ~4 pc from the center of the supernova remnant, putting it in close proximity to the outer boundary of the radio pulsar wind nebula. Based on our observed remnant dynamics and the standard explosion energy of 10^51 erg, we estimate the total ejecta mass to be <~ 8 M_sun, and we propose an upper limit of <~ 35 M_sun on the progenitor's mass.
  • We present a comprehensive spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of Supernova (SN) 1987A with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The non-thermal and thermal components of the radio emission are investigated in images from 94 to 672 GHz ($\lambda$ 3.2 mm to 450 $\mu$m), with the assistance of a high-resolution 44 GHz synchrotron template from the ATCA, and a dust template from ALMA observations at 672 GHz. An analysis of the emission distribution over the equatorial ring in images from 44 to 345 GHz highlights a gradual decrease of the east-to-west asymmetry ratio with frequency. We attribute this to the shorter synchrotron lifetime at high frequencies. Across the transition from radio to far infrared, both the synchrotron/dust-subtracted images and the spectral energy distribution (SED) suggest additional emission beside the main synchrotron component ($S_{\nu}\propto\nu^{-0.73}$) and the thermal component originating from dust grains at $T\sim22$ K. This excess could be due to free-free flux or emission from grains of colder dust. However, a second flat-spectrum synchrotron component appears to better fit the SED, implying that the emission could be attributed to a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The residual emission is mainly localised west of the SN site, as the spectral analysis yields $-0.4\lesssim\alpha\lesssim-0.1$ across the western regions, with $\alpha\sim0$ around the central region. If there is a PWN in the remnant interior, these data suggest that the pulsar may be offset westward from the SN position.
  • We have performed a deep Chandra observation of Galactic Type Ia supernova remnant G299.2-2.9. Here we report the initial results from our imaging and spectral analysis. The observed abundance ratios of the central ejecta are in good agreement with those predicted by delayed-detonation Type Ia supernovae models. We reveal inhomogeneous spatial and spectral structures of metal-rich ejecta in G299.2-2.9. The Fe/Si abundance ratio in the northern part of the central ejecta is higher than that in the southern part. An elongation of ejecta material extends out to the western outermost boundary of the remnant. In this western elongation, both the Si and Fe are enriched with a similar abundance ratio to that in the southern part of the central nebula. These structured distributions of metal-rich ejecta material suggest that this Type Ia supernova might have undergone a significantly asymmetric explosion and/or has been expanding into a structured medium.
  • We report on the initial results from our deep Chandra observation (450 ks) of O-rich supernova remnant (SNR) B0049-73.6 in the Small Magellanic Cloud. We detect small metal-rich ejecta features extending out to the outermost boundary of B0049-73.6, which were not seen in the previous data with a shorter exposure. The central nebula is dominated by emission from reverse-shocked ejecta material enriched in O, Ne, Mg, and Si. O-rich ejecta distribution is relatively smooth throughout the central nebula. In contrast the Si-rich material is highly structured. These results suggest that B0049-73.6 was produced by an asymmetric core-collapse explosion of a massive star. The estimated abundance ratios among these ejecta elements are in plausible agreement with the nucleosynthesis products from the explosion of a 13-15$M_{\odot}$ progenitor. The central ring-like (in projection) ejecta nebula extends to $\sim$9 pc from the SNR center. This suggests that the contact discontinuity may be located at a further distance from the SNR center than the previous estimate. We estimate the Sedov age of $\sim$17000 yr and an explosion energy of $E_0$ $\sim1.7 \times~10^{51}$ erg for B0049-73.6. We place a stringent upper limit on the 2-7 keV band luminosity of $L_{X}\sim$ 8.5 $\times 10^{31}$ erg s$^{-1}$ for the embedded compact stellar remnant at the center of B0049-73.6.
  • Cas A is a Galactic supernova remnant whose supernova explosion is observed to be of Type IIb from spectroscopy of its light echo. Having its SN type known, observational constraints on the mass-loss history of Cas A's progenitor can provide crucial information on the final fate of massive stars. In this paper, we study X-ray characteristics of the shocked ambient gas in Cas A using the 1 Ms observation carried out with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and try to constrain the mass-loss history of the progenitor star. We identify thermal emission from the shocked ambient gas along the outer boundary of the remnant. Comparison of measured radial variations of spectroscopic parameters of the shocked ambient gas to the self-similar solutions of Chevalier show that Cas A is expanding into a circumstellar wind rather than into a uniform medium. We estimate a wind density nH ~ 0.9 $\pm$ 0.3 cm$^{-3}$ at the current outer radius of the remnant (~3 pc), which we interpret as a dense slow wind from a red supergiant (RSG) star. Our results suggest that the progenitor star of Cas A had an initial mass around 16 Msun, and its mass before the explosion was about 5 Msun, with uncertainties of several tens of percent. Furthermore, the results suggest that, among the mass lost from the progenitor star (~11 Msun), a significant amount (more than 6 Msun) could have been via its RSG wind.
  • We present the first 3-dimensional simulations following the evolution of supernova shocks from their inception in the stellar core through the development of a supernova remnant into the Sedov phase. Our set of simulations use two different progenitors and two different conditions for the structure of the circumstellar environment. These calculations demonstrate the role that supernova instabilities (the instabilities that develop as the shock drive through the star) play in defining the structure and long-term development of instabilities in supernova remnants. We also present a first investigation of the mixing between stellar and interstellar matter as the supernova evolves into a young supernova remnant.
  • We have performed deep X-ray observations of the remnant of Kepler's supernova (SN 1604) as a Key Project of the Suzaku Observatory. Our main goal is to detect secondary Fe-peak elements in the SN ejecta to gain insights into the Type Ia supernova explosion mechanism and the nature of the progenitor. Here we report our initial results. We made a conclusive detection of X-ray emission lines from highly ionized Mn, Cr, and Ni as well as Fe. The observed Mn-to-Cr line flux ratio is ~0.60, ~30% larger than that measured in Tycho's remnant. We estimate a Mn-to-Cr mass ratio of ~0.77, which is strongly suggestive of a large neutron excess in the progenitor star before the onset of the thermonuclear runaway. The observed Ni-to-Fe line flux ratio (~0.03) corresponds to a mass ratio of ~0.06, which is generally consistent with the products of explosive Si-burning regime in Type Ia explosion models, and rules out contamination from the products of neutron-rich nuclear statistical equilibrium in the shocked ejecta. Together with the previously suggested luminous nature of the explosion, these mass ratios provide strong evidence for a super-solar metallicity in the SN progenitor (~3 Z_sun). Kepler's supernova was likely the thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf formed in the recent past that must have exploded through a relatively prompt channel.
  • It is now well established that Kepler's supernova remnant is the result of a Type Ia explosion. With an age of 407 years, and an angular diameter of ~ 4', Kepler is estimated to be between 3.0 and 7.0 kpc distant. Unlike other Galactic Type Ia supernova remnants such as Tycho and SN 1006, and SNR 0509-67.5 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, Kepler shows evidence for a strong circumstellar interaction. A bowshock structure in the north is thought to originate from the motion of a mass-losing system through the interstellar medium prior to the supernova. We present results of hydrodynamical and spectral modeling aimed at constraining the circumstellar environment of the system and the amount of 56Ni produced in the explosion. Using models that contain either 0.3 M_sun (subenergetic) or 1 M_sun (energetic) of 56Ni, we simulate the interaction between supernova Ia ejecta and various circumstellar density models. Based on dynamical considerations alone, we find that the subenergetic models favor a distance to the SNR of < 6.4 kpc, while the model that produces 1 M_sun of 56Ni requires a distance to the SNR of > 7 kpc. The X-ray spectrum is consistent with an explosion that produced ~ 1 M_sun of 56Ni, ruling out the subenergetic models, and suggesting that Kepler's SNR was a SN 1991T-like event. Additionally, the X-ray spectrum rules out a pure 1/r^2 wind profile expected from isotropic mass loss up to the time of the supernova. Introducing a small cavity around the progenitor system results in modeled X-ray spectra that are consistent with the observed spectrum. If a wind shaped circumstellar environment is necessary to explain the dynamics and X-ray emission from the shocked ejecta in Kepler's SNR, then we require that the distance to the remnant be greater than 7 kpc.
  • We present mid-infrared continuum and emission line images of the Galactic oxygen-rich supernova remnant (SNR) G292.0+1.8, acquired using the MIPS and IRS instruments on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The MIPS 24 micron and 70 micron images of G292.0+1.8 are dominated by continuum emission from a network of filaments encircling the SNR. The morphology of the SNR, as seen in the mid-infrared, resembles that seen in X-rays with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Most of the mid-infrared emission in the MIPS images is produced by circumstellar dust heated in the non-radiative shocks around G292.0+1.8, confirming the results of earlier mid-IR observations with AKARI. In addition to emission from hot dust, we have also mapped atomic line emission between 14 micron and 36 micron using IRS spectral maps. The line emission is primarily associated with the bright oxygen-rich optical knots, but is also detected from fast-moving knots of ejecta. We confirm our earlier detection of 15-25 micron emission characteristic of magnesium silicate dust in spectra of the radiatively shocked ejecta. We do not detect silicon line emission from any of the radiatively shocked ejecta in the southeast of the SNR, possibly because that the reverse shock has not yet penetrated most of the Si-rich ejecta in that region. This may indicate that G292.0+1.8 is less evolved in the southeast than the rest of the SNR, and may be further evidence in favor of an asymmetric SN explosion as proposed in recent X-ray studies of G292.0+1.8.
  • We report on the results from our deep Chandra observation (120 ks) of the supernova remnant (SNR) N49 and soft Gamma-ray repeater (SGR) 0526-66 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We firmly establish the detection of an ejecta "bullet" beyond the southwestern boundary of N49. The X-ray spectrum of the bullet is distinguished from that of the main SNR shell, showing significantly enhanced Si and S abundances. We also detect an ejecta feature in the eastern shell, which shows metal overabundances similar to those of the bullet. If N49 was produced by a core-collapse explosion of a massive star, the detected Si-rich ejecta may represent explosive O-burning or incomplete Si-burning products from deep interior of the supernova. On the other hand, the observed Si/S abundance ratio in the ejecta may favor Type Ia origin for N49. We refine the Sedov age of N49, tau_Sed ~ 4800 yr, with the explosion energy E_0 ~ 1.8 x 10^51 erg. Our blackbody (BB) + power law (PL) model for the quiescent X-ray emission from SGR 0526-66 indicates that the PL photon index (Gamma ~ 2.5) is identical to that of PSR 1E1048.1-5937, the well-known candidate transition object between anomalous X-ray pulsars and SGRs. Alternatively, the two-component BB model implies X-ray emission from a small (R ~ 1 km) hot spot(s) (kT ~ 1 keV) in addition to emission from the neutron star's cooler surface (R ~ 10 km, kT ~ 0.4 keV). There is a considerable discrepancy in the estimated column toward 0526-66 between BB+PL and BB+BB model fits. Discriminating these spectral models would be crucial to test the long-debated physical association between N49 and 0526-66.
  • We have been monitoring the supernova remnant (SNR) 1987A with {\it Chandra} observations since 1999. Here we report on the latest change in the soft X-ray light curve of SNR 1987A. For the last $\sim$1.5 yr (since day $\sim$8000), the soft X-ray flux has significantly flattened, staying (within uncertainties) at $f_{\rm X}$ $\sim$ 5.7 $\times$ 10$^{-12}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ (corresponding to $L_{\rm X}$ $\sim$ 3.6 $\times$ 10$^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$) in the 0.5--2 keV band. This remarkable change in the recent soft X-ray light curve suggests that the forward shock is now interacting with a decreasing density structure, after interacting with an increasing density gradient over $\sim$10 yr prior to day $\sim$8000. Possibilities may include the case that the shock is now propagating beyond a density peak of the inner ring. We briefly discuss some possible implications on the nature of the progenitor and the future prospects of our {\it Chandra} monitoring observations.
  • We present a 1.42 square degree mosaic of diffuse X-ray emission in the Great Nebula in Carina from the Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer camera. After removing >14,000 X-ray point sources from the field, we smooth the remaining unresolved emission, tessellate it into segments of similar apparent surface brightness, and perform X-ray spectral fitting on those tessellates to infer the intrinsic properties of the X-ray-emitting plasma. By modeling faint resolved point sources, we estimate the contribution to the extended X-ray emission from unresolved point sources and show that the vast majority of Carina's unresolved X-ray emission is truly diffuse. Line-like correlated residuals in the X-ray spectral fits suggest that substantial X-ray emission is generated by charge exchange at the interfaces between Carina's hot, rarefied plasma and its many cold neutral pillars, ridges, and clumps.
  • We report our 110 ks Chandra observations of the supernova remnant (SNR) 0104-72.3 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The X-ray morphology shows two prominent lobes along the northwest-southeast direction and a soft faint arc in the east. Previous low resolution X-ray images attributed the unresolved emission from the southeastern lobe to a Be/X-ray star. Our high resolution Chandra data clearly shows that this emission is diffuse, shock-heated plasma, with negligible X-ray emission from the Be star. The eastern arc is positionally coincident with a filament seen in optical and infrared observations. Its X-ray spectrum is well fit by plasma of normal SMC abundances, suggesting that it is from shocked ambient gas. The X-ray spectra of the lobes show overabundant Fe, which is interpreted as emission from the reverse-shocked Fe-rich ejecta. The overall spectral characteristics of the lobes and the arc are similar to those of Type Ia SNRs, and we propose that SNR 0104-72.3 is the first case for a robust candidate Type Ia SNR in the SMC. On the other hand, the remnant appears to be interacting with dense clouds toward the east and to be associated with a nearby star-forming region. These features are unusual for a standard Type Ia SNR. Our results suggest an intriguing possibility that the progenitor of SNR 0104-72.3 might have been a white dwarf of a relatively young population.
  • We present an analysis of the Suzaku observations of the prototype wind-blown bubble NGC 6888 which is based both on use of standard spectral models and on a direct comparison of theoretical models with observations. The X-ray spectra of NGC 6888 are soft and most of the X-rays are in the (0.3 - 1.5 keV) energy range. But, hard X-rays (1.5 - 4.0 keV) are also detected (~10% of the observed flux). The corresponding spectral fits require a relatively cool plasma with kT < 0.5 keV but much hotter plasma with temperature kT > 2.0 keV is needed to match the observed hard X-ray emission. We find no appreciable temperature variations within the hot bubble in NGC 6888. The derived abundances (N, O, Ne) are consistent with those of the optical nebula. This indicates a common origin of the X-ray emitting gas and the outer cold shell: most of the X-ray plasma (having non-uniform spatial distribution: clumps) has flown into the hot bubble from the optical nebula. If the electron thermal conduction is efficient, this can naturally explain the relatively low plasma temperature of most of the X-ray emitting plasma. Alternatively, the hot bubble in NGC 6888 will be adiabatic and the cold clumps are heated up to X-ray temperatures likely by energy exchange between the heavy particles (hot ions diffusing into the cold clumps).
  • We have used the Spitzer satellite to monitor the mid-IR evolution of SN 1987A over a 5 year period spanning the epochs between days 6000 and 8000 since the explosion. The supernova (SN) has evolved into a supernova remnant (SNR) and its radiative output is dominated by the interaction of the SN blast wave with the pre-existing equatorial ring (ER). The mid-IR spectrum is dominated by emission from ~180 K silicate dust, collisionally-heated by the hot X-ray emitting gas with a temperature and density of ~5x10^6 K and 3x10^4 cm-3, respectively. The mass of the radiating dust is ~1.2x10^(-6) Msun on day 7554, and scales linearly with IR flux. The infrared to soft-X-ray flux ratio is roughly constant with a value of 2.5. Gas-grain collisions therefore dominate the cooling of the shocked gas. The constancy of of this ratio suggests that very little grain processing or gas cooling have occurred throughout this epoch. The shape of the dust spectrum remained unchanged during the observations while the total flux increased with a time dependence of t^(0.87), t being the time since the first encounter between the blast wave and the ER. These observations are consistent with the transitioning of the blast wave from free expansion to a Sedov phase as it propagates into the main body of the ER.
  • We present an extended analysis of deep Chandra HETG observations of the WR+OB binary system WR 147 that was resolved into a double X-ray source (Zhekov & Park, 2010, ApJ, 709, L119). Our analysis of the profiles of strong emission lines shows that their centroids are blue-shifted in the spectrum of the northern X-ray source. We find no suppressed forbidden line in the He-like triplets which indicates that the X-ray emitting region is not located near enough to the stars in the binary system to be significantly affected by their UV radiation. The most likely physical picture that emerges from the entire set of HETG data suggests that the northern X-ray source can be associated with the colliding stellar wind region in the wide WR+OB binary system, while the X-rays of its southern counterpart, the WN8 star, are result from stellar wind shocking onto a close companion (a hypothesized third star in the system).
  • We report on the results from H{\alpha} imaging observations of the eastern limb of Tycho's supernova remnant (SN1572) using the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope. We resolve the detailed structure of the fast, collisionless shock wave into a delicate structure of nearly edge-on filaments. We find a gradual increase of H{\alpha} intensity just ahead of the shock front, which we interpret as emission from the thin (~1") shock precursor. We find that a significant amount of the H{\alpha} emission comes from the precursor and that this could affect the amount of temperature equilibration derived from the observed flux ratio of the broad and narrow H{\alpha} components. The observed H{\alpha} emission profiles are fit using simple precursor models, and we discuss the relevant parameters. We suggest that the precursor is likely due to cosmic rays and discuss the efficiency of cosmic-ray acceleration at this position.
  • We continue to explore the validity of the reflected shock structure (RSS) picture in SNR 1987A that was proposed in our previous analyses of the X-ray emission from this object. We used an improved version of our RSS model in a global analysis of 14 CCD spectra from the monitoring program with Chandra. In the framework of the RSS picture, we are able to match both the expansion velocity curve deduced from the analysis of the X-ray images and light curve. Using a simplified analysis, we also show that the X-rays and the non-thermal radio emission may originate from the same shock structure (the blast wave). We believe that using the RSS model in the analysis of grating data from the Chandra monitoring program of SNR 1987A that cover a long enough time interval, will allow us to build a more realistic physical picture and model of SNR 1987A.