• We perform for the first time a detailed search for active-sterile oscillations involving a light sterile neutrino, over a large $\Delta m^2_{41}$ range of $10^{-5}$ eV$^2$ to $10^2$ eV$^2$, using 10 years of atmospheric neutrino data expected from the proposed 50 kt magnetized ICAL detector at the INO. This detector can observe the atmospheric $\nu_{\mu}$ and $\bar\nu_{\mu}$ separately over a wide range of energies and baselines, making it sensitive to the magnitude and sign of $\Delta m^2_{41}$ over a large range. If there is no light sterile neutrino, ICAL can place competitive upper limit on $|U_{\mu 4}|^2 \lesssim 0.02$ at 90\% C.L. for $\Delta m^2_{41}$ in the range $(0.5 - 5) \times 10^{-3}$ eV$^2$. For the same $|\Delta m^2_{41}|$ range, ICAL would be able to determine its sign, exploiting the Earth's matter effect in $\mu^{-}$ and $\mu^{+}$ events separately if there is indeed a light sterile neutrino in Nature. This would help identify the neutrino mass ordering in the four-neutrino mixing scenario.
  • We investigate the performance of T2HK in the presence of a light eV scale sterile neutrino. We study in detail its influence in resolving fundamental issues like mass hierarchy, CP-violation (CPV) induced by the standard CP-phase $\delta_{13}$ and new CP-phase $\delta_{14}$, and the octant ambiguity of $\theta_{23}$. We show for the first time in detail that due to the impressive energy reconstruction capabilities of T2HK, the available spectral information plays an important role to enhance the mass hierarchy discovery reach of this experiment in 3$\nu$ framework and also to keep it almost intact even in $4\nu$ scheme. This feature is also of the utmost importance in establishing the CPV due to $\delta_{14}$. As far as the sensitivity to CPV due to $\delta_{13}$ is concerned, it does not change much going from $3\nu$ to 4$\nu$ case. We also examine the reconstruction capability of the two phases $\delta_{13}$ and $\delta_{14}$, and find that the typical 1$\sigma$ uncertainty on $\delta_{13}$ ($\delta_{14}$) in T2HK is $\sim15^0$ ($30^0$). While determining the octant of $\theta_{23}$, we face a complete loss of sensitivity for unfavorable combinations of unknown $\delta_{13}$ and $\delta_{14}$.
  • We consider schemes of neutrino mixing arising within the discrete symmetry approach to the well-known flavour problem. We concentrate on $3\nu$ mixing schemes in which the cosine of the Dirac CP violation phase $\delta_\mathrm{CP}$ satisfies a sum rule by which it is expressed in terms of three neutrino mixing angles $\theta_{12}$, $\theta_{23}$, and $\theta_{13}$, and a fixed real angle $\theta^\nu_{12}$, whose value depends on the employed discrete symmetry and its breaking. We consider five underlying symmetry forms of the neutrino mixing matrix: bimaximal (BM), tri-bimaximal (TBM), golden ratio A (GRA) and B (GRB), and hexagonal (HG). For each symmetry form, the sum rule yields specific prediction for $\cos\delta_\mathrm{CP}$ for fixed $\theta_{12}$, $\theta_{23}$, and $\theta_{13}$. In the context of the proposed DUNE and T2HK facilities, we study (i) the compatibility of these predictions with present neutrino oscillation data, and (ii) the potential of these experiments to discriminate between various symmetry forms.
  • The Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) is a popular particle physics candidate for the dark matter (DM). It can annihilate and/or decay to neutrino and antineutrino pair. The proposed 50 kt Magnetized Iron CALorimeter (MagICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) can observe these pairs over the conventional atmospheric neutrino and antineutrino fluxes. If we do not see any excess of events in ten years, then INO-Magical can place competitive limits on self-annihilation cross-section ($\langle\sigma v\rangle$) and decay lifetime ($\tau$) of dark matter at 90\% C.L.: $\langle\sigma v\rangle\leq 1.87\,\times\,10^{-24}$ cm$^3$ s$^{-1}$ and $\tau\geq 4.8\,\times\,10^{24}$ s for $m_\chi$ = 10 GeV assuming the NFW as DM density profile.
  • A detailed study of a fermionic quintuplet dark matter in a left-right symmetric scenario is performed in this article. The minimal quintuplet dark matter model is highly constrained from the WMAP dark matter relic density (RD) data. To elevate this constraint, an extra singlet scalar is introduced. It introduces a host of new annihilation and co-annihilation channels for the dark matter, allowing even sub-TeV masses. The phenomenology of this singlet scalar is studied in detail in the context of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiment. The production and decay of this singlet scalar at the LHC give rise to interesting resonant di-Higgs or diphoton final states. We also constrain the RD allowed parameter space of this model in light of the ATLAS bounds on the resonant di-Higgs and diphoton cross-sections.
  • Flavor-dependent long-range leptonic forces mediated by the ultra-light and neutral bosons associated with gauged $L_e-L_\mu$ or $L_e-L_\tau$ symmetry constitute a minimal extension of the Standard Model. In presence of these new anomaly free abelian symmetries, the SM remains invariant and renormalizable, and can lead to interesting phenomenological consequences. For an example, the electrons inside the Sun can generate a flavor-dependent long-range potential at the Earth surface, which can enhance $\nu_\mu$ and $\bar\nu_\mu$ survival probabilities over a wide range of energies and baselines in atmospheric neutrino experiments. In this paper, we explore in detail the possible impacts of these long-range flavor-diagonal neutral current interactions due to $L_e-L_\mu$ and $L_e-L_\tau$ symmetries (one at-a-time) in the context of proposed 50 kt magnetized ICAL detector at INO. Combining the information on muon momentum and hadron energy on an event-by-event basis, ICAL can place stringent constraints on the effective gauge coupling $\alpha_{e\mu/e\tau}<1.2\times 10^{-53}$ ($1.75\times 10^{-53}$) at 90$\%$ (3$\sigma$) C.L. with 500 kt$\cdot$yr exposure. The 90$\%$ C.L. limit on $\alpha_{e\mu}$ ($\alpha_{e\tau}$) from ICAL is $\sim 46$ (53) times better than the existing bound from the Super-Kamiokande experiment.
  • The signatures for the existence of dark matter are revealed only through its gravitational interaction. Theoretical arguments support that the Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) can be a class of dark matter and it can annihilate and/or decay to Standard Model particles, among which neutrino is a favorable candidate. We show that the proposed 50 kt Magnetized Iron CALorimeter (MagICAL) detector under the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) project can play an important role in the indirect searches of Galactic diffuse dark matter in the neutrino and antineutrino mode separately. We present the sensitivity of 500 kt$\cdot$yr MagICAL detector to set limits on the velocity-averaged self-annihilation cross-section ($\langle\sigma v\rangle$) and decay lifetime ($\tau$) of dark matter having mass in the range of 2 GeV $\leq m_\chi \leq $ 90 GeV and 4 GeV $\leq m_\chi \leq $ 180 GeV respectively, assuming no excess over the conventional atmospheric neutrino and antineutrino fluxes at the INO site. Our limits for low mass dark matter constrain the parameter space which has not been explored before. We show that MagICAL will be able to set competitive constraints, $\langle\sigma v\rangle\leq 1.87\,\times\,10^{-24}$ cm$^3$ s$^{-1}$ for $\chi\chi\rightarrow\nu\bar\nu$ and $\tau\geq 4.8\,\times\,10^{24}$ s for $\chi\rightarrow\nu\bar\nu$ at 90$\%$ C.L. (1 d.o.f.) for $m_\chi$ = 10 GeV assuming the NFW as dark matter density profile.
  • Neutrino mass hierarchy, CP-violation, and octant of $\theta_{23}$ are the fundamental unknowns in neutrino oscillations. In order to address all these three unknowns, we study the physics reach of a setup, where we replace the antineutrino run of T2HK with antineutrinos from muon decay at rest ($\mu$-DAR). This approach has the advantages of having higher statistics in both neutrino and antineutrino modes, and lower beam-on backgrounds for antineutrino run with reduced systematics. We find that a hybrid setup consisting of T2HK ($\nu$) and $\mu$-DAR ($\bar\nu$) in conjunction with full exposure from T2K and NO$\nu$A can resolve the issue of mass hierarchy at greater than 3$\sigma$ C.L. irrespective of the choices of hierarchy, $\delta_{\mathrm{CP}}$, and $\theta_{23}$. This hybrid setup can also establish the CP-violation at 5$\sigma$ C.L. for $\sim$ 55% choices of $\delta_{\mathrm{CP}}$, whereas the same for conventional T2HK ($\nu + \bar\nu$) setup along with T2K and NO$\nu$A is around 30%. As far as the octant of $\theta_{23}$ is concerned, this hybrid setup can exclude the wrong octant at 5$\sigma$ C.L. if $\theta_{23}$ is at least $3^{\circ}$ away from maximal mixing for any $\delta_{\mathrm{CP}}$.
  • The ICAL Collaboration: Shakeel Ahmed, M. Sajjad Athar, Rashid Hasan, Mohammad Salim, S. K. Singh, S. S. R. Inbanathan (The American College), Venktesh Singh, V. S. Subrahmanyam, Shiba Prasad Behera, Vinay B. Chandratre, Nitali Dash, Vivek M. Datar, V. K. S. Kashyap, Ajit K. Mohanty, Lalit M. Pant, Animesh Chatterjee, Sandhya Choubey, Raj Gandhi, Anushree Ghosh, Deepak Tiwari (HRI, Allahabad), Ali Ajmi, S. Uma Sankar, Prafulla Behera, Aleena Chacko, Sadiq Jafer, James Libby, K. Raveendrababu, K. R. Rebin, D. Indumathi, K. Meghna, S. M. Lakshmi, M. V. N. Murthy, Sumanta Pal, G. Rajasekaran, Nita Sinha, Sanjib Kumar Agarwalla, Amina Khatun, Poonam Mehta, Vipin Bhatnagar, R. Kanishka, A. Kumar, J. S. Shahi, J. B. Singh, Monojit Ghosh, Pomita Ghoshal, Srubabati Goswami, Chandan Gupta, Sushant Raut, Sudeb Bhattacharya, Suvendu Bose, Ambar Ghosal, Abhik Jash, Kamalesh Kar, Debasish Majumdar, Nayana Majumdar, Supratik Mukhopadhyay, Satyajit Saha (Saha Inst. Nucl. Phys., Kolkata), B. S. Acharya, Sudeshna Banerjee, Kolahal Bhattacharya, Sudeshna Dasgupta, Moon Moon Devi, Amol Dighe, Gobinda Majumder, Naba K. Mondal, Asmita Redij, Deepak Samuel, B. Satyanarayana, Tarak Thakore, C. D. Ravikumar, A. M. Vinodkumar, Gautam Gangopadhyay, Amitava Raychaudhuri, Brajesh C. Choudhary, Ankit Gaur, Daljeet Kaur, Ashok Kumar, Sanjeev Kumar, Md. Naimuddin, Waseem Bari, Manzoor A. Malik, S. Krishnaveni, H. B. Ravikumar, C. Ranganathaiah, Saikat Biswas, Subhasis Chattopadhyay, Rajesh Ganai, Tapasi Ghosh, Y. P. Viyogi
    May 9, 2017 hep-ph, hep-ex, physics.ins-det
    The upcoming 50 kt magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is designed to study the atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos separately over a wide range of energies and path lengths. The primary focus of this experiment is to explore the Earth matter effects by observing the energy and zenith angle dependence of the atmospheric neutrinos in the multi-GeV range. This study will be crucial to address some of the outstanding issues in neutrino oscillation physics, including the fundamental issue of neutrino mass hierarchy. In this document, we present the physics potential of the detector as obtained from realistic detector simulations. We describe the simulation framework, the neutrino interactions in the detector, and the expected response of the detector to particles traversing it. The ICAL detector can determine the energy and direction of the muons to a high precision, and in addition, its sensitivity to multi-GeV hadrons increases its physics reach substantially. Its charge identification capability, and hence its ability to distinguish neutrinos from antineutrinos, makes it an efficient detector for determining the neutrino mass hierarchy. In this report, we outline the analyses carried out for the determination of neutrino mass hierarchy and precision measurements of atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters at ICAL, and give the expected physics reach of the detector with 10 years of runtime. We also explore the potential of ICAL for probing new physics scenarios like CPT violation and the presence of magnetic monopoles.
  • Current 3$\nu$ global fits predict two degenerate solutions for $\theta_{23}$: one lies in lower octant ($\theta_{23} <\pi/4$), and the other belongs to higher octant ($\theta_{23} >\pi/4$). Here, we study how the measurement of $\theta_{23}$ octant would be affected in the upcoming Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) if there exist a light eV-scale sterile neutrino. We show that in 3+1 scheme, a new interference term in $\nu_\mu \to \nu_e$ oscillation probability can spoil the chances of measuring $\theta_{23}$ octant completely.
  • Present global fits of world neutrino data hint towards non-maximal $\theta_{23}$ with two nearly degenerate solutions, one in the lower octant ($\theta_{23} <\pi/4$), and the other in the higher octant ($\theta_{23} >\pi/4$). This octant ambiguity of $\theta_{23}$ is one of the fundamental issues in the neutrino sector, and its resolution is a crucial goal of next-generation long-baseline (LBL) experiments. In this letter, we address for the first time, the impact of a light eV-scale sterile neutrino towards such a measurement, taking the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) as a case study. In the so-called 3+1 scheme involving three active and one sterile neutrino, the $\nu_\mu \to \nu_e$ transition probability probed in the LBL experiments acquires a new interference term via active-sterile oscillations. We find that this novel interference term can mimic a swap of the $\theta_{23}$ octant, even if one uses the information from both neutrino and antineutrino channels. As a consequence, the sensitivity to the octant of $\theta_{23}$ can be completely lost and this may have serious implications in our understanding of neutrinos from both the experimental and theoretical perspectives.
  • We investigate the implications of one light eV scale sterile neutrino on the physics potential of the proposed long-baseline experiment DUNE. If the future short-baseline experiments confirm the existence of sterile neutrinos, then it can affect the mass hierarchy (MH) and CP-violation (CPV) searches at DUNE. The MH sensitivity still remains above 5$\sigma$ if the three new mixing angles ($\theta_{14}, \theta_{24}, \theta_{34}$) are all close to $\theta_{13}$. In contrast, it can decrease to 4$\sigma$ if the least constrained mixing angle $\theta_{34}$ is close to its upper limit $\sim 30^0$. We also assess the sensitivity to the CPV induced both by the standard CP-phase $\delta_{13} \equiv \delta$, and the new CP-phases $\delta_{14}$ and $\delta_{34}$. In the 3+1 scheme, the discovery potential of CPV induced by $\delta_{13}$ gets deteriorated compared to the 3$\nu$ case. In particular, the maximal sensitivity (reached around $\delta_{13}$ $\sim$ $\pm$ $90^0$) decreases from $5\sigma$ to $4\sigma$ if all the three new mixing angles are close to $\theta_{13}$. It can further diminish to almost $3\sigma$ if $\theta_{34}$ is large ($\sim 30^0$). The sensitivity to the CPV due to $\delta_{14}$ can reach 3$\sigma$ for an appreciable fraction of its true values. Interestingly, $\theta_{34}$ and its associated phase $\delta_{34}$ can influence both the $\nu_e$ appearance and $\nu_\mu$ disappearance channels via matter effects, which in DUNE are pronounced. Hence, DUNE can also probe CPV induced by $\delta_{34}$ provided $\theta_{34}$ is large. We also reconstruct the two phases $\delta_{13}$ and $\delta_{14}$. The typical 1$\sigma$ uncertainty on $\delta_{13}$ ($\delta_{14}$) is $\sim20^0$ ($30^0$) if $\theta_{34} =0$. The reconstruction of $\delta_{14}$ (but not that of $\delta_{13}$) degrades if $\theta_{34}$ is large.
  • We expound in detail the degeneracy between the octant of $\theta_{23}$ and flavor-changing neutral-current non-standard interactions (NSI's) in neutrino propagation, considering the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) as a case study. In the presence of such NSI parameters involving the $e-\mu$ ($\varepsilon_{e\mu}$) and $e-\tau$ ($\varepsilon_{e\tau}$) flavors, the $\nu_\mu \to \nu_e$ and $\bar\nu_\mu \to \bar\nu_e$ appearance probabilities in long-baseline experiments acquire an additional interference term, which depends on one new dynamical CP-phase $\phi_{e\mu/e\tau}$. This term sums up with the well-known interference term related to the standard CP-phase $\delta$ creating a source of confusion in the determination of the octant of $\theta_{23}$. We show that for values of the NSI coupling (taken one at-a-time) as small as $few\,\%$ (relative to the Fermi coupling constant $G_{\mathrm F}$), and for unfavorable combinations of the two CP-phases $\delta$ and $\phi_{e\mu/e\tau}$, the discovery potential of the octant of $\theta_{23}$ gets completely lost.
  • We construct a model containing a viable dark matter candidate, in the framework of left-right symmetry, which can explain both width and cross-section of the observed 750 GeV diphoton excess at the LHC. We introduce a fermion quintuplet whose neutral component can be a possible dark matter candidate, whereas the charged components enhance the loop induced coupling of a 750 GeV singlet scalar with a pair of photons. We study the photo-production of the singlet scalar and its various decay modes, successfully addressing both the ATLAS and the CMS diphoton excess.
  • We study the impact of one light sterile neutrino on the prospective data expected to come from the two presently running long-baseline experiments T2K and NOvA when they will accumulate their full planned exposure. Introducing for the first time, the bi-probability representation in the 4-flavor framework, commonly used in the 3-flavor scenario, we present a detailed discussion of the behavior of the numu to nue and numubar to nuebar transition probabilities in the 3+1 scheme. We also perform a detailed sensitivity study of these two experiments (both in the stand-alone and combined modes) to assess their discovery reach in the presence of a light sterile neutrino. For realistic benchmark values of the mass-mixing parameters (as inferred from the existing global short-baseline fits), we find that the performance of both these experiments in claiming the discovery of the CP-violation induced by the standard CP-phase delta13 equivalent to delta, and the neutrino mass hierarchy get substantially deteriorated. The exact loss of sensitivity depends on the value of the unknown CP-phase delta14. Finally, we estimate the discovery potential of total CP-violation (i.e., induced simultaneously by the two CP-phases delta13 and delta14), and the capability of the two experiments of reconstructing the true values of such CP-phases. The typical (1 sigma level) uncertainties on the reconstructed phases are approximately 40 degree for delta13 and 50 degree for delta14.
  • The Standard Model gauge group can be extended with minimal matter content by introducing anomaly free U(1) symmetry, such as $L_e-L_{\mu}$ or $L_e-L_{\tau}$. If the neutral gauge boson corresponding to this abelian symmetry is ultra-light, then it will give rise to flavor-dependent long-range leptonic force, which can have significant impact on neutrino oscillations. For an instance, the electrons inside the Sun can generate a flavor-dependent long-range potential at the Earth surface, which can suppress the $\nu_{\mu} \to \nu_e$ appearance probability in terrestrial experiments. The sign of this potential is opposite for anti-neutrinos, and affects the oscillations of (anti-)neutrinos in different fashion. This feature invokes fake CP-asymmetry like the SM matter effect and can severely affect the leptonic CP-violation searches in long-baseline experiments. In this paper, we study in detail the possible impacts of these long-range flavor-diagonal neutral current interactions due to $L_e-L_{\mu}$ symmetry, when (anti-)neutrinos travel from Fermilab to Homestake (1300 km) and CERN to Pyh\"asalmi (2290 km) in the context of future high-precision superbeam facilities, DUNE and LBNO respectively. If there is no signal of long-range force, DUNE (LBNO) can place stringent constraint on the effective gauge coupling $\alpha_{e\mu} < 1.9 \times 10^{-53}~(7.8 \times 10^{-54})$ at 90% C.L., which is almost 30 (70) times better than the existing bound from the Super-Kamiokande experiment. We also observe that if $\alpha_{e\mu} \geq 2 \times 10^{-52}$, the CP-violation discovery reach of these future facilities vanishes completely. The mass hierarchy measurement remains robust in DUNE (LBNO) if $\alpha_{e\mu} < 5 \times 10^{-52}~(10^{-52})$.
  • In this article we unravel the role of matter effect in neutrino oscillation in the presence of lepton-flavor-conserving, non-universal non-standard interactions (NSI's) of the neutrino. Employing the Jacobi method, we derive approximate analytical expressions for the effective mass-squared differences and mixing angles in matter. It is shown that, within the effective mixing matrix, the Standard Model (SM) W-exchange interaction only affects $\theta_{12}$ and $\theta_{13}$, while the flavor-diagonal NSI's only affect $\theta_{23}$. The CP-violating phase $\delta$ remains unaffected. Using our simple and compact analytical approximation, we study the impact of the flavor-diagonal NSI's on the neutrino oscillation probabilities for various appearance and disappearance channels. At higher energies and longer baselines, it is found that the impact of the NSI's can be significant in the numu to numu channel, which can probed in future atmospheric neutrino experiments, if the NSI's are of the order of their current upper bounds. Our analysis also enables us to explore the possible degeneracy between the octant of $\theta_{23}$ and the sign of the NSI parameter for a given choice of mass hierarchy in a simple manner.
  • In this article we consider the presence of neutrino non-standard interactions (NSI) in the production and detection processes of reactor antineutrinos at the Daya Bay experiment. We report for the first time, the new constraints on the flavor non-universal and flavor universal charged-current NSI parameters, estimated using the currently released 621 days of Daya Bay data. New limits are placed assuming that the new physics effects are just inverse of each other in the production and detection processes. With this special choice of the NSI parameters, we observe a shift in the oscillation amplitude without distorting the $L/E$ pattern of the oscillation probability. This shift in the depth of the oscillation dip can be caused by the NSI parameters as well as by $\theta_{13}$, making it quite difficult to disentangle the NSI effects from the standard oscillations. We explore the correlations between the NSI parameters and $\theta_{13}$ that may lead to significant deviations in the reported value of the reactor mixing angle with the help of iso-probability surface plots. Finally, we present the limits on electron, muon/tau, and flavor universal (FU) NSI couplings with and without considering the uncertainty in the normalization of the total event rates. Assuming a perfect knowledge of the event rates normalization, we find strong upper bounds $\sim$ 0.1\% for the electron and FU cases improving the present limits by one order of magnitude. However, for a conservative error of 5\% in the total normalization, these constraints are relaxed by almost one order of magnitude.
  • The proposed ICAL experiment at INO aims to identify the neutrino mass hierarchy from observations of atmospheric neutrinos, and help improve the precision on the atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters. While the design of ICAL is primarily optimized to measure muon momentum, it is also capable of measuring the hadron energy in each event. Although the hadron energy is measured with relatively lower resolution, it nevertheless contains crucial information on the event, which may be extracted when taken concomitant with the muon data. We demonstrate that by adding the hadron energy information to the muon energy and muon direction in each event, the sensitivity of ICAL to the neutrino parameters can be improved significantly. Using the realistic detector response for ICAL, we present its enhanced reach for determining the neutrino mass hierarchy, the atmospheric mass squared difference and the mixing angle theta23, including its octant. In particular, we show that the analysis that uses hadron energy information can distinguish the normal and inverted mass hierarchies with Deltachi^2 approx 9 with 10 years exposure at the 50 kt ICAL, which corresponds to about 40% improvement over the muon-only analysis.
  • A high-power neutrino superbeam experiment at the ESS facility has been proposed such that the source-detector distance falls at the second oscillation maximum, giving very good sensitivity towards establishing CP violation. In this work, we explore the comparative physics reach of the experiment in terms of leptonic CP-violation, precision on atmospheric parameters, non-maximal theta23, and its octant for a variety of choices for the baselines. We also vary the neutrino vs. the anti-neutrino running time for the beam, and study its impact on the physics goals of the experiment. We find that for the determination of CP violation, 540 km baseline with 7 years of neutrino and 3 years of anti-neutrino (7nu+3nubar) run-plan performs the best and one expects a 5sigma sensitivity to CP violation for 48% of true values of deltaCP. The projected reach for the 200 km baseline with 7nu+3nubar run-plan is somewhat worse with 5sigma sensitivity for 34% of true values of deltaCP. On the other hand, for the discovery of a non-maximal theta23 and its octant, the 200 km baseline option with 7nu+3nubar run-plan performs significantly better than the other baselines. A 5sigma determination of a non-maximal theta23 can be made if the true value of sin^2theta23 lesssim 0.45 or sin^2theta23 gtrsim 0.57. The octant of theta23 could be resolved at 5sigma if the true value of sin^2theta23 lesssim 0.43 or gtrsim 0.59, irrespective of deltaCP.
  • We examine the prospects for detecting supernova $\nu_e$ in JUNO, RENO-50, LENA, or other approved or proposed large liquid scintillator detectors. The main detection channels for supernova $\nu_e$ in a liquid scintillator are its elastic scattering with electrons and its charged-current interaction with the $^{12}$C nucleus. In existing scintillator detectors, the numbers of events from these interactions are too small to be very useful. However, at the 20-kton scale planned for the new detectors, these channels become powerful tools for probing the $\nu_e$ emission. We find that the $\nu_e$ spectrum can be well measured, to better than $\sim 40\%$ precision for the total energy and better than $\sim 25\%$ precision for the average energy. This is adequate to distinguish even close average energies, e.g., 11 MeV and 14 MeV, which will test the predictions of supernova models. In addition, it will help set constraints on neutrino mixing effects in supernovae by testing non-thermal spectra. Without such large liquid scintillator detectors (or Super-Kamiokande with added gadolinium, which has similar capabilities), supernova $\nu_e$ will be measured poorly, holding back progress on understanding supernovae, neutrinos, and possible new physics.
  • We argue that the neutrino oscillation probabilities in matter are best understood by allowing the mixing angles and mass-squared differences in the standard parametrization to `run' with the matter effect parameter $a=2\sqrt{2}G_F N_e E$, where $N_e$ is the electron density in matter and $E$ is the neutrino energy. We present simple analytical approximations to these `running' parameters. We show that for the moderately large value of $\theta_{13}$, as discovered by the reactor experiments, the running of the mixing angle $\theta_{23}$ and the CP violating phase $\delta$ can be neglected. It simplifies the analysis of the resulting expressions for the oscillation probabilities considerably. Approaches which attempt to directly provide approximate analytical expressions for the oscillation probabilities in matter suffer in accuracy due to their reliance on expansion in $\theta_{13}$, or in simplicity when higher order terms in $\theta_{13}$ are included. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method by comparing it to the exact numerical result, as well as the direct approximations of Cervera et al., Akhmedov et al., Asano and Minakata, and Freund. We also discuss the utility of our approach in figuring out the required baseline lengths and neutrino energies for the oscillation probabilities to exhibit certain desirable features.
  • The discovery of neutrino mixing and oscillations over the past decade provides firm evidence for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Recently, theta13 has been determined to be moderately large, quite close to its previous upper bound. This represents a significant milestone in establishing the three-flavor oscillation picture of neutrinos. It has opened up exciting prospects for current and future long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments towards addressing the remaining fundamental questions, in particular the type of the neutrino mass hierarchy and the possible presence of a CP-violating phase. Another recent and crucial development is the indication of non-maximal 2-3 mixing angle, causing the octant ambiguity of theta23. In this paper, I will review the phenomenology of long-baseline neutrino oscillations with a special emphasis on sub-leading three-flavor effects, which will play a crucial role in resolving these unknowns. First, I will give a brief description of neutrino oscillation phenomenon. Then, I will discuss our present global understanding of the neutrino mass-mixing parameters and will identify the major unknowns in this sector. After that, I will present the physics reach of current generation long-baseline experiments. Finally, I will conclude with a discussion on the physics capabilities of accelerator-driven possible future long-baseline precision oscillation facilities.
  • Recent measurement of a moderately large value of theta13 signifies an important breakthrough in establishing the standard three flavor oscillation picture of neutrinos. It has provided an opportunity to explore the sub-dominant three flavor effects in present and future long-baseline experiments. In this paper, we perform a comparative study of the physics reach of two future superbeam facilities, LBNE and LBNO in their first phases of run, to resolve the issues of neutrino mass hierarchy, octant of theta23, and leptonic CP violation. We also find that the sensitivity of these future facilities can be improved significantly by adding the projected data from T2K and NOvA. Stand-alone LBNO setup with a 10 kt detector has a mass hierarchy discovery reach of more than 7 sigma, for the lowest allowed value of sin^2theta23(true) = 0.34. This result is valid for any choice of true deltaCP and hierarchy. LBNE10, in combination with T2K and NOvA, can achieve 3 sigma hierarchy discrimination for any choice of deltaCP, sin^2theta23, and hierarchy. The same combination can provide a 3 sigma octant resolution for sin^2theta23(true) leq 0.44 or for sin^2theta23(true) geq 0.58 for all values of deltaCP(true). LBNO can give similar results with 10 kt detector mass. In their first phases, both LBNE10 and LBNO with 20 kt detector can establish leptonic CP violation for around 50% values of true deltaCP at 2 sigma confidence level. In case of LBNE10, CP coverage at 3 sigma can be enhanced from 3% to 43% by combining T2K and NOvA data, assuming sin^2theta23(true) = 0.5. For LBNO setup, CP violation discovery at 3 sigma is possible for 46% values of true deltaCP if we add the data from T2K and NOvA.
  • A precise measurement of the atmospheric mass-squared splitting |\Delta m^2_{\mu\mu}| is crucial to establish the three-flavor paradigm and to constrain the neutrino mass models. In addition, a precise value of |\Delta m^2_{\mu\mu}| will significantly enhance the hierarchy reach of future medium-baseline reactor experiments like JUNO and RENO-50. In this work, we explore the precision in |\Delta m^2_{\mu\mu}| that will be available after the full runs of T2K and NOvA. We find that the combined data will be able to improve the precision in |\Delta m^2_{\mu\mu}| to sub-percent level for maximal 2-3 mixing. Depending on the true value of \sin^2\theta_{23} in the currently-allowed 3 sigma range, the precision in |\Delta m^2_{\mu\mu}| will vary from 0.87% to 1.24%. We further demonstrate that this is a robust measurement as it remains almost unaffected by the present uncertainties in \theta_{13}, \delta_{CP}, the choice of mass hierarchy, and the systematic errors.