• We consider a discrete-time Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) control problem in which Massey's directed information from the observed output of the plant to the control input is minimized while required control performance is attainable. This problem arises in several different contexts, including joint encoder and controller design for data-rate minimization in networked control systems. We show that the optimal control law is a Linear-Gaussian randomized policy. We also identify the state space realization of the optimal policy, which can be synthesized by an efficient algorithm based on semidefinite programming. Our structural result indicates that the filter-controller separation principle from the LQG control theory, and the sensor-filter separation principle from the zero-delay rate-distortion theory for Gauss-Markov sources hold simultaneously in the considered problem. A connection to the data-rate theorem for mean-square stability by Nair and Evans is also established.
  • We consider a class of non-linear dynamics on a graph that contains and generalizes various models from network systems and control and study convergence to uniform agreement states using gradient methods. In particular, under the assumption of detailed balance, we provide a method to formulate the governing ODE system in gradient descent form of sum-separable energy functions, which thus represent a class of Lyapunov functions; this class coincides with Csisz\'{a}r's information divergences. Our approach bases on a transformation of the original problem to a mass-preserving transport problem and it reflects a little-noticed general structure result for passive network synthesis obtained by B.D.O. Anderson and P.J. Moylan in 1975. The proposed gradient formulation extends known gradient results in dynamical systems obtained recently by M. Erbar and J. Maas in the context of porous medium equations. Furthermore, we exhibit a novel relationship between inhomogeneous Markov chains and passive non-linear circuits through gradient systems, and show that passivity of resistor elements is equivalent to strict convexity of sum-separable stored energy. Eventually, we discuss our results at the intersection of Markov chains and network systems under sinusoidal coupling.
  • Sequential rate-distortion (SRD) theory provides a framework for studying the fundamental trade-off between data-rate and data-quality in real-time communication systems. In this paper, we consider the SRD problem for multi-dimensional time-varying Gauss-Markov processes under mean-square distortion criteria. We first revisit the sensor-estimator separation principle, which asserts that considered SRD problem is equivalent to a joint sensor and estimator design problem in which data-rate of the sensor output is minimized while the estimator's performance satisfies the distortion criteria. We then show that the optimal joint design can be performed by semidefinite programming. A semidefinite representation of the corresponding SRD function is obtained. Implications of the obtained result in the context of zero-delay source coding theory and applications to networked control theory are also discussed.
  • In this theoretical study, we determine the maximum amount of work extractable in finite time by a demon performing continuous measurements on a quadratic Hamiltonian system subjected to thermal fluctuations, in terms of the information extracted from the system. This is in contrast to many recent studies that focus on demons' maximizing the extracted work over received information, and operate close to equilibrium. The maximum work demon is found to apply a high-gain continuous feedback using a Kalman-Bucy estimate of the system state. A simple and concrete electrical implementation of the feedback protocol is proposed, which allows for analytic expressions of the flows of energy and entropy inside the demon. This let us show that any implementation of the demon must necessarily include an external power source, which we prove both from classical thermodynamics arguments and from a version of Landauer's memory erasure argument extended to non-equilibrium linear systems.
  • Given the possibility of communication systems failing catastrophically, we investigate limits to communicating over channels that fail at random times. These channels are finite-state semi-Markov channels. We show that communication with arbitrarily small probability of error is not possible. Making use of results in finite blocklength channel coding, we determine sequences of blocklengths that optimize transmission volume communicated at fixed maximum message error probabilities. We provide a partial ordering of communication channels. A dynamic programming formulation is used to show the structural result that channel state feedback does not improve performance.