• Coherence and entanglement are the two most crucial resources for various quantum information processing tasks. Here, we study the interplay of coherence and entanglement under the action of different three qubit quantum cloning operations. Considering certain well-known quantum cloning machines (input state independent and dependent), we provide examples of coherent and incoherent operations performed by them. We show that both the output entanglement and coherence could vanish under incoherent cloning operations. Coherent cloning operations on the other hand, could be used to construct a universal and optimal coherence machine. It is also shown that under coherent cloning operations the output two qubit entanglement could be maximal even if the input coherence is negligible. Also it is possible to generate a fixed amount of entanglement independent of the nature of the input state.
  • Employing the Pauli matrices, we have constructed a set of operators, which can be used to distinguish six inequivalent classes of entanglement under SLOCC (stochastic local operation and classical communication) for three-qubit pure states. These operators have very simple structure and can be obtained from the Mermin's operator with suitable choice of directions. Moreover these operators may be implemented in an experiment to distinguish the types of entanglement present in a state. We show that the measurement of only one operator is sufficient to distinguish GHZ class from rest of the classes. It is also shown that it is possible to detect and classify other classes by performing a small number of measurements. We also show how to construct such observables in any basis. We also consider a few mixed states to investigate the usefulness of our operators. Furthermore, we consider the teleportation scheme of Lee et al. (Phys. Rev. A 72, 024302 (2005)) and show that the partial tangles and hence teleportation fidelity can be measured. We have also shown that these partial tangles can also be used to classify genuinely entangled state, biseparable state and separable state.
  • We introduce a new concept called as the mutual uncertainty between two observables in a given quantum state which enjoys similar features like the mutual information for two random variables. Further, we define the conditional uncertainty as well as conditional variance and show that conditioning on more observable reduces the uncertainty. Given three observables, we prove a 'strong sub-additivity' relation for the conditional uncertainty under certain condition. As an application, we show that using the conditional variance one can detect bipartite higher dimensional entangled states. The efficacy of our detection method lies in the fact that it gives better detection criteria than most of the existing criteria based on geometry of the states. Interestingly, we find that for $N$-qubit product states, the mutual uncertainty is exactly equal to $N-\sqrt{N}$, and if it is other than this value, the state is entangled. We also show that using the mutual uncertainty between two observables, one can detect non-Gaussian steering where Reid's criteria fails to detect. Our results may open up a new direction of exploration in quantum theory and quantum information using the mutual uncertainty, conditional uncertainty and the strong sub-additivity for multiple observables.
  • Structural physical approximation (SPA) has been exploited to approximate non-physical operation such as partial transpose. It has already been studied in the context of detection of entanglement and found that if the minimum eigenvalue of SPA to partial transpose is less than $\frac{2}{9}$ then the two-qubit state is entangled. We find application of SPA to partial transpose in the estimation of optimal singlet fraction. We show that optimal singlet fraction can be expressed in terms of minimum eigenvalue of SPA to partial transpose. We also show that optimal singlet fraction can be realized using Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometry with only two detectors. Further we have shown that the generated hybrid entangled state between a qubit and a binary coherent state can be used as a resource state in quantum teleportation.
  • Representing graphs as quantum states is becoming an increasingly important approach to study entanglement of mixed states, alternate to the standard linear algebraic density matrix-based approach of study. In this paper, we propose a general weighted directed graph framework for investigating properties of a large class of quantum states which are defined by three types of Laplacian matrices associated with such graphs. We generalize the standard framework of defining density matrices from simple connected graphs to density matrices using both combinatorial and signless Laplacian matrices associated with weighted directed graphs with complex edge weights and with/without self-loops. We also introduce a new notion of Laplacian matrix, which we call signed Laplacian matrix associated with such graphs. We produce necessary and/or sufficient conditions for such graphs to correspond to pure and mixed quantum states. Using these criteria, we finally determine the graphs whose corresponding density matrices represent entangled pure states which are well known and important for quantum computation applications. We observe that all these entangled pure states share a common combinatorial structure.
  • We analyze the efficacy of multiqubit W-type states as resources for quantum information. For this, we identify and generalize four-qubit W-type states. Our results show that the states can be used as resources for deterministic quantum information processing. The utility of results, however, is limited by the availability of experimental setups to perform and distinguish multiqubit measurements. We, therefore, emphasize on another protocol where two users want to establish an optimal bipartite entanglement using the partially entangled W-type states. We found that for such practical purposes, four-qubit W states can be a better resource in comparison to three-qubit W-type states. For dense coding protocol, our states can be used deterministically to send two bits of classical message by locally manipulating a single qubit.
  • We study the efficacy of two-qubit mixed entangled states as resources for quantum teleportation. We first consider two maximally entangled mixed states, viz., the Werner state\cite{werner}, and a class of states introduced by Munro {\it et al.} \cite{munro}. We show that the Werner state when used as teleportation channel, gives rise to better average teleportation fidelity compared to the latter class of states for any finite value of mixedness. We then introduce a non-maximally entangled mixed state obtained as a convex combination of a two-qubit entangled mixed state and a two-qubit separable mixed state. It is shown that such a teleportation channel can outperform another non-maximally entangled channed, viz., the Werner derivative for a certain range of mixedness. Further, there exists a range of parameter values where the former state satisfies a Bell-CHSH type inequality and still performs better as a teleportation channel compared to the Werner derivative even though the latter violates the inequality.
  • We, in this paper, analyze the efficacy of an output as a resource from a universal quantum cloning machine in information processing tasks such as teleportation and dense coding. For this, we have considered the $3\otimes 3$ dimensional system (or qutrit system). The output states are found to be NPT states for certain ranges of machine parameters. Using the output state as an entangled resource, we have also studied the optimal fidelities of teleportation and capacities of dense coding protocols with respect to the machine parameters and have made a few interesting observations. Our work is mainly motivated from the fact that the cloning output can be used as a resource in quantum information processing and adds a valuable dimension to the applications of cloning machines.
  • Mermin's inequality is the generalization of the Bell-CHSH inequality for three qubit states. The violation of the Mermin inequality guarantees the fact that there exists quantum non-locality either between two or three qubits in a three qubit system. In the absence of an analytical result to this effect, in order to check for the violation of Mermin's inequality one has to perform a numerical optimization procedure for even three qubit pure states. Here we derive an analytical formula for the maximum value of the expectation of the Mermin operator in terms of eigenvalues of symmetric matrices, that gives the maximal violation of the Mermin inequality for all three qubit pure and mixed states.
  • We exhibit the intriguing phenomena of "Less is More" using a set of multipartite entangled states. We consider the quantum communication protocols for the {\em exact} teleportation, superdense coding, and quantum key distribution. We find that sometimes {\em less} entanglement is {\em more} useful. To understand this phenomena we obtain a condition that a resource state must satisfy to communicate a $n$-qubit pure state with $m$ terms. We find that the an appropriate partition of the resource state should have a von-Neumann entropy of ${\rm log}_{2} m$. Furthermore, it is shown that some states may be suitable for exact superdense coding, but not for exact teleportation.
  • It is known that maximally entangled Bell state and three-qubit W-type states are very useful in various quantum information processing task. Thus the problem of preparation of these type of states is very important in quantum information theory. But the factor which prohibit the generation of the above mentioned pure states shared between two and three distant partners is decoherence. When we send one qubit, from a two qubit state, through decoherence channel like amplitude damping channel, the purity of the qubit is lost and it ends up with a mixed state. Therefore it is very difficult to keep the pure maximally entangled state in a maximally entangled pure state or in an entangled state with high entanglement. In this work we have provided a method by which one can generate experimentally a maximally entangled Bell states shared between distant parties with a non-zero probability when a qubit, from a two qubit general state, passes through decoherence channel. Therefore, despite of the fact that qubit is interacting with the noisy channel, we are able to generate Bell state shared between two distant partners. Further, we have shown that it is possible to generate pure three-qubit W-type states shared between three distant partners using economical quantum cloning machine and weak-measurement based feed-forward control scheme, even though the second and third qubit is interacting with the noisy channel. Lastly, we have shown that the generated three-qubit W-type states can be used in teleporting one of the two non-orthogonal states.
  • The classification of the multipartite entanglement is an important problem in quantum information theory. We propose a class of two qubit mixed states $\sigma_{AB}= p|\chi_{1}\rangle\langle\chi_{1}|\otimes\rho_{1}+(1-p)|\chi_{2}\rangle\langle\chi_{2}|\otimes\rho_{2}$, where $|\chi_{1}\rangle=\alpha|0\rangle+\beta|1\rangle$, $|\chi_{2}\rangle=\beta|0\rangle+(-1)^{n}\alpha|1\rangle$. We have shown that the state $\sigma_{AB}$ represent a classical state when $n$ is odd while it represent a non-classical state when $n$ is even. The purification of the state $\sigma_{AB}$ is studied and found that the purification is possible if the spectral decomposition of the density matrices $\rho_{1}$ and $\rho_{2}$ represent pure states. We have established a relationship between three tangle, which measures the amount of entanglement in three qubit system and the quantity $\langle\chi_{1}|\chi_{2}\rangle$, which identifies whether the two qubit mixed state is classical or non-classical. The three qubit purified state is then classified as a separable or biseparable or W-type or GHZ-type state using the quantum correlation, measured by geometric discord, of its reduced two qubit density matrix.
  • We demonstrate the possibility of achieving the maximum possible singlet fraction using a entangled mixed two-qubit state as a resource. For this, we establish a tight upper bound on singlet fraction and show that the maximal singlet fraction obtained in \cite{Verstraete} does not attain the obtained upper bound on the singlet fraction. Interestingly, we found that the required upper bound can in fact be achieved using local filtering operations.
  • We study bipartite entangled states in arbitrary dimensions and obtain different bounds for the entanglement measures in terms of teleportation fidelity. We find that there is a simple relation between negativity and teleportation fidelity for pure states but for mixed states, an upper bound is obtained for negativity in terms of teleportation fidelity using convex-roof extension negativity (CREN). However, with this it is not clear how to distinguish betweeen states useful for teleportation and positive partial transpose (PPT) entangled states. Further, there exists a strong conjecture in the literature that all PPT entangled states, in 3 \times 3 systems, have Schmidt rank two. This motivates us to develop measures capable of identifying states useful for teleportation and dependent on the Schmidt number. We thus establish various relations between teleportation fidelity and entanglement measures depending upon Schmidt rank of the states. These relations and bounds help us to determine the amount of entanglement required for teleportation, which we call the ``Entanglement of Teleportation''. These bounds are used to determine the teleportation fidelity as well as the entanglement required for teleportation of states modeled by a two qutrit mixed system, as well as two qubit open quantum systems.
  • We demonstrate the possibility of controlling the success probability of a secret sharing protocol using a quantum cloning circuit. The cloning circuit is used to clone the qubits containing the encoded information and {\em en route} to the intended receipients. The success probability of the protocol depends on the cloning parameters used to clone the qubits. We also establish a relation between the concurrence of initially prepared state, entanglement of the mixed state received by the receivers after cloning scheme and the cloning parameters of cloning machine.
  • Quantum Algorithms have long captured the imagination of computer scientists and physicists primarily because of the speed up achieved by them over their classical counterparts using principles of quantum mechanics. Entanglement is believed to be the primary phenomena behind this speed up. However their precise role in quantum algorithms is yet unclear. In this article, we explore the nature of entanglement in the Grover's search algorithm. This algorithm enables searching of elements from an unstructured database quadratically faster than the best known classical algorithm. Geometric measure of entanglement has been used to quantify and analyse entanglement across iterations of the algorithm. We reveal how the entanglement varies with increase in the number of qubits and also with the number of marked or solution states. Numerically, it is seen that the behaviour of the maximum value of entanglement is monotonous with the number of qubits. Also, for a given value of the number of qubits, a change in the marked states alters the amount of entanglement. The amount of entanglement in the final state of the algorithm has been shown to depend solely on the nature of the marked states. Explicit analytical expressions are given showing the variation of entanglement with the number of iterations and the global maximum value of entanglement attained across all iterations of the algorithm.
  • Administratively withdrawn.
  • Entanglement lies at the heart of quantum mechanics and has no classical analogue. It is central to the speed up achieved by quantum algorithms over their classical counterparts. The Grover's search algorithm is one such algorithm which enables us to achieve a quadratic speed up over any known classical algorithm that searches for an element in an unstructured database. Here, we analyse and quantify the effects of entanglement in the generalized version of this algorithm for two qubits. By 'generalized', it is meant that the use of any arbitrary single qubit unitary gate is permitted to create superposed states. Our analysis has been firstly on a noise free environment and secondly in the presence of noise. In the absence of noise, we establish a relation between the concurrence and the amplitude of the final state thereby showing the explicit effects of entanglement on the same. Moreover, the effects of noisy channels, namely amplitude and phase damping channels are studied. We investigate the amount of quantum correlation in the states obtained after the phase inversion stage of the algorithm followed by interaction of those states with the noisy environment. The quantum correlations are quantified by geometric discord. It has been revealed that the states generated after the effect of amplitude damping on the phase inverted states of the quantum search algorithm possess non-zero quantum correlation even when entanglement is absent. However, this is absent in the phase damping scenario.
  • We propose a generalized form of optimal teleportation witness to demonstrate their importance in experimental detection of the larger set of entangled states useful for teleportation in higher dimensional systems. The interesting properties of our witness reveal that teleportation witness can be used to characterize mixed state entanglement using Schmidt numbers. Our results show that while every teleportation witness is also a entanglement witness, the converse is not true. Also, we show that a hermitian operator is a teleportation witness iff it is a decomposable entanglement witness. In addition, we analyze the practical significance of our study by decomposing our teleportation witness in terms of Pauli and Gell-Mann matrices, which are experimentally measurable quantities.
  • Teleportation witnesses are hermitian operators which can identify useful entanglement for quantum teleportation. Here we provide a systematic method to construct teleportation witnesses from entanglement witnesses corresponding to general qudit systems. The witnesses so constructed are shown to be optimal for qubit and qutrit systems, and therefore detect the largest set of states useful for teleportation within a given class. We demonstrate the action of the witness pertaining to different classes of states in qubits and qutrits. Decomposition of the witness in terms of spin operators facilitiates experimental identification of useful resources for teleportation.
  • Quantum discord is a prominent measure of quantum correlations, playing an important role in expanding its horizon beyond entanglement. Here we provide an operational meaning of (geometric) discord, which quantifies the amount of non-classical correlation of an arbitrary quantum system in terms of its minimal distance from the set of classical states, in terms of teleportation fidelity for general two qubit and $d \otimes d$ dimensional isotropic and Werner states. A critical value of the discord is found beyond which the two qubit state must violate the Bell inequality. This is illustrated by an open system model of a dissipative two qubit. For the $d \otimes d$ dimensional states the lower bound of discord is shown to be obtainable from an experimentally measurable witness operator.
  • In a realistic situation, the secret sharing of classical or quantum information will involve the transmission of this information through noisy channels. We consider a three qubit pure state. This state becomes a mixed-state when the qubits are distributed over noisy channels. We focus on a specific noisy channel, the phase-damping channel. We propose a protocol for secret sharing of classical information with this and related noisy channels. This protocol can also be thought of as cooperative superdense coding. We also discuss other noisy channels to examine the possibility of secret sharing of classical information.
  • The ability of entangled states to act as resource for teleportation is linked to a property of the fully entangled fraction. We show that the set of states with their fully entangled fraction bounded by a threshold value required for performing teleportation is both convex and compact. This feature enables for the existence of hermitian witness operators the measurement of which could distinguish unknown states useful for performing teleportation. We present an example of such a witness operator illustrating it for different classes of states.
  • We investigate the issue of finding common entanglement witness for certain class of states and extend this study to the case of Schmidt number witnesses. We also introduce the notion of common decomposable and non-decomposable witness operators which is specially useful for constructing a common witness where one of the entangled states is with a positive partial transpose. Our approach is illustrated with the help of suitable examples of qutrit systems.
  • Quantum secret sharing is one of the most important and interesting quantum information processing task. In quantum secret sharing, information is split among several parties such that only one of them is able to recover the qubit exactly provided all the other parties agree to cooperate. To achieve this task, all the parties need to share entangled state. As far as my knowledge, all the previous quantum secret sharing protocol used either pure tripartite or pure bipartite entangled state. In this work we use for the first time bipartite two qubit mixed state (formed due to noisy environment) in quantum secret sharing scheme. We further show that one party cannot extract the information without the collaboration of other party. We also study the property of the shared mixed state used in the quantum secret sharing scheme.