• The new generation of X-ray polarisation detectors, gas pixel detectors, which will be employed by the future space missions IXPE and eXTP, allows for spatially resolved X-ray polarisation studies. This will be of particular interest for X-ray synchrotron emission from extended sources like young supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae. Here we report on employing a polarisation statistic that can be used to makes maps in the Stokes I, Q, and U parameters, a method that we expand by correcting for the energy-dependent instrumental modulation factor, using optimal weighting of the signal. In order to explore the types of Stokes maps that can be obtained, we present a Monte Carlo simulation program called xpolim, with which different polarisation weighting schemes are explored. We illustrate its use with simulations of polarisation maps of young supernova remnants, after having described the general science case for polarisation studies of supernova remnants, and its connection to magnetic-field turbulence. We use xpolim simulations to show that in general deep, ~2 Ms observations are needed to recover polarisation signals, in particular for Cas A, for which in the polarisation fraction may be as low as 5%.
  • In hierarchical models of galaxy formation, stellar tidal streams are expected around most, if not all, galaxies. Although these features may provide useful diagnostics of the $\Lambda$CDM model, their observational properties remain poorly constrained because they are challenging to detect and interpret and have been studied in detail for only a sparse sampling of galaxy population. More quantitative, systematic approaches are required. We advocate statistical analysis of the counts and properties of such features in archival wide-field imaging surveys for a direct comparison against results from numerical simulations. Thus, in this paper we aim to study systematically the frequency of occurrence and other observational properties of tidal features around nearby galaxies. The sample we construct will act as a foundational dataset for statistical comparison with cosmological models of galaxy formation. Our approach is based on a visual classification of diffuse features around a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies, using a post-processing of Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging optimized for the detection of stellar structure with low surface brightness. At a limiting surface brightness of $28\ \mathrm{mag~arcsec^{-2}}$, 14% of the galaxies in our sample exhibit evidence of diffuse features likely to have arisen from minor merging events. Our technique recovers all previously known streams in our sample and yields a number of new candidates. Consistent with previous studies, coherent arc-like features and shells are the most common type of tidal structures found in this study. We conclude that although some detections are ambiguous and could be corroborated or refuted with deeper imaging, our technique provides a reliable foundation for the statistical analysis of diffuse circumgalactic features in wide-area imaging surveys, and for the identification of targets for follow-up studies.
  • How did the Sun affect the air pollution on the Earth? There are few papers about this question. This work investigates the relationship between the air pollution and solar activity by using the geophysical and environmental data during the period of 2000-2016. It is quite certain that the solar activity may impact on the air pollution, but the relationship is very weak and indirect. The Pearson correlation, Spearman rank correlation, Kendalls rank correlation, and conditional probability were adopted to analyze the air pollution index (API), air quality index (AQI), sunspot number (SSN), radio flux at wavelength of 10.7 cm (F10.7), and total solar irradiance (TSI). The analysis implies that the correlation coefficient between API and SSN is weak ($-0.17<r<0.32$) with complex variation. The main results are: (1) For cities with higher air pollution, the probability of high API will be increased along with SSN, then reach to a maximum, and then decreased; (2) For cities with lower air pollution, the API has lower correlation with SSN; (3) The relationship between API and F10.7, or API and TSI are also similar as API and SSN. The solar activities take direct effect on TSI and the energetic particle flux, and indirect and long-term effect on lower atmosphere and weather near the Earth. All of these factors contribute to the air pollution on the Earth.
  • We present the first systematic study of the density structure of clouds found in a complete sample covering all major molecular clouds in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ; inner $\sim{}200~\rm{}pc$) of the Milky Way. This is made possible by using data from the Galactic Center Molecular Cloud Survey (GCMS), the first study resolving all major molecular clouds in the CMZ at interferometer angular resolution. We find that many CMZ molecular clouds have unusually shallow density gradients compared to regions elsewhere in the Milky Way. This is possibly a consequence of weak gravitational binding of the clouds. The resulting relative absence of dense gas on spatial scales $\sim{}0.1~\rm{}pc$ is probably one of the reasons why star formation (SF) in dense gas of the CMZ is suppressed by a factor $\sim{}10$, compared to solar neighborhood clouds. Another factor suppressing star formation are the high SF density thresholds that likely result from the observed gas kinematics. Further, it is possible but not certain that the star formation activity and the cloud density structure evolve systematically as clouds orbit the CMZ.
  • The Central Molecular Zone (CMZ; inner $\sim{}200~\rm{}pc$) of the Milky Way is a star formation (SF) environment with very extreme physical properties. Exploration of SF in this region is important because (i) this region allows us to test models of star formation under exceptional conditions, and (ii) the CMZ clouds might be suitable to serve as templates to understand the physics of starburst galaxies in the nearby and the distant universe. For this reason we launched the Galactic Center Molecular Cloud Survey (GCMS), the first systematic study that resolves all major CMZ clouds at interferometer angular resolution (i.e., a few arc seconds). Here we present initial results based on observations with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX). Our study is complemented by dust emission data from the Herschel Space Telescope and a comprehensive literature survey of CMZ star formation activity. Our research reveals (i) an unusually steep linewidth-size relation, $\sigma(v)\propto{}r_{\rm{}eff}^{0.66\pm{}0.18}$, down to velocity dispersions $\sim{}0.6~\rm{}km\,s^{-1}$ at 0.1 pc scale. This scaling law potentially results from the decay of gas motions to transonic velocities in strong shocks. The data also show that, relative to dense gas in the solar neighborhood, (ii) star formation is suppressed by factors $\gtrsim{}10$ in individual CMZ clouds. This observation encourages exploration of processes that can suppress SF inside dense clouds for a significant period of time.
  • Context: Anticyclonic vortices are considered as a favourable places for trapping dust and forming planetary embryos. On the other hand, they are massive blobs that can interact gravitationally with the planets in the disc. Aims: We aim to study how a vortex interacts gravitationally with a planet which migrates toward it or a planet which is created inside the vortex. Methods: We performed hydrodynamical simulations of a viscous locally isothermal disc using GFARGO and FARGO-ADSG. We set a stationary Gaussian pressure bump in the disc in a way that RWI is triggered. After a large vortex is established, we implanted a low mass planet in the outer disc or inside the vortex and allowed it to migrate. We also examined the effect of vortex strength on the planet migration and checked the validity of the final result in the presence of self-gravity. Results: We noticed regardless of the planet's initial position, the planet is finally locked to the vortex or its migration is stopped in a farther orbital distance in case of a stronger vortex. For the model with the weaker vortex, we studied the effect of different parameters such as background viscosity, background surface density, mass of the planet and different planet positions. In these models, while the trapping time and locking angle of the planet vary for different parameters, the main result, which is the planet-vortex locking, remains valid. We discovered that even a planet with a mass less than 5 * 10^{-7} M_{\star} comes out from the vortex and is locked to it at the same orbital distance. For a stronger vortex, both in non-self-gravitated and self-gravitating models, the planet migration is stopped far away from the radial position of the vortex. This effect can make the vortices a suitable place for continual planet formation under the condition that they save their shape during the planetary growth.