• Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) gives a practical means of extracting dynamic information from data, in the form of spatial modes and their associated frequencies and growth/decay rates. DMD can be considered as a numerical approximation to the Koopman operator, an infinite-dimensional linear operator defined for (nonlinear) dynamical systems. This work proposes a new criterion to estimate the accuracy of DMD on a mode-by-mode basis, by estimating how closely each individual DMD eigenfunction approximates the corresponding Koopman eigenfunction. This approach does not require any prior knowledge of the system dynamics or the true Koopman spectral decomposition. The method may be applied to extensions of DMD (i.e., extended/kernel DMD), which are applicable to a wider range of problems. The accuracy criterion is first validated against the true error with a synthetic system for which the true Koopman spectral decomposition is known. We next demonstrate how this proposed accuracy criterion can be used to assess the performance of various choices of kernel when using the kernel method for extended DMD. Finally, we show that our proposed method successfully identifies modes of high accuracy when applying DMD to data from experiments in fluids, in particular particle image velocimetry of a cylinder wake and a canonical separated boundary layer.
  • Simple aerodynamic configurations under even modest conditions can exhibit complex flows with a wide range of temporal and spatial features. It has become common practice in the analysis of these flows to look for and extract physically important features, or modes, as a first step in the analysis. This step typically starts with a modal decomposition of an experimental or numerical dataset of the flow field, or of an operator relevant to the system. We describe herein some of the dominant techniques for accomplishing these modal decompositions and analyses that have seen a surge of activity in recent decades. For a non-expert, keeping track of recent developments can be daunting, and the intent of this document is to provide an introduction to modal analysis that is accessible to the larger fluid dynamics community. In particular, we present a brief overview of several of the well-established techniques and clearly lay the framework of these methods using familiar linear algebra. The modal analysis techniques covered in this paper include the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), balanced proper orthogonal decomposition (Balanced POD), dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), Koopman analysis, global linear stability analysis, and resolvent analysis.
  • Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) provides a practical means of extracting insightful dynamical information from fluids datasets. Like any data processing technique, DMD's usefulness is limited by its ability to extract real and accurate dynamical features from noise-corrupted data. Here we show analytically that DMD is biased to sensor noise, and quantify how this bias depends on the size and noise level of the data. We present three modifications to DMD that can be used to remove this bias: (i) a direct correction of the identified bias using known noise properties, (ii) combining the results of performing DMD forwards and backwards in time, and (iii) a total least-squares-inspired algorithm. We discuss the relative merits of each algorithm, and demonstrate the performance of these modifications on a range of synthetic, numerical, and experimental datasets. We further compare our modified DMD algorithms with other variants proposed in recent literature.
  • Unsteady aerodynamic models are necessary to accurately simulate forces and develop feedback controllers for wings in agile motion; however, these models are often high dimensional or incompatible with modern control techniques. Recently, reduced-order unsteady aerodynamic models have been developed for a pitching and plunging airfoil by linearizing the discretized Navier-Stokes equation with lift-force output. In this work, we extend these reduced-order models to include multiple inputs (pitch, plunge, and surge) and explicit parameterization by the pitch-axis location, inspired by Theodorsen's model. Next, we investigate the na\"{\i}ve application of system identification techniques to input--output data and the resulting pitfalls, such as unstable or inaccurate models. Finally, robust feedback controllers are constructed based on these low-dimensional state-space models for simulations of a rigid flat plate at Reynolds number 100. Various controllers are implemented for models linearized at base angles of attack $\alpha_0=0^\circ, \alpha_0=10^\circ$, and $\alpha_0=20^\circ$. The resulting control laws are able to track an aggressive reference lift trajectory while attenuating sensor noise and compensating for strong nonlinearities.