• We present results from a medium-resolution (R ~ 2, 000) spectroscopic follow-up campaign of 1,694 bright (V < 13.5), very metal-poor star candidates from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). Initial selection of the low-metallicity targets was based on the stellar parameters published in RAVE Data Releases 4 and 5. Follow-up was accomplished with the Gemini-N and Gemini-S, the ESO/NTT, the KPNO/Mayall, and the SOAR telescopes. The wavelength coverage for most of the observed spectra allows for the determination of carbon and {\alpha}-element abundances, which are crucial for con- sidering the nature and frequency of the carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars in this sample. We find that 88% of the observed stars have [Fe/H] <= -1.0, 61% have [Fe/H] <= -2.0, and 3% have [Fe/H] <= -3.0 (with four stars at [Fe/H] <= -3.5). There are 306 CEMP star candidates in this sample, and we identify 169 CEMP Group I, 131 CEMP Group II, and 6 CEMP Group III stars from the A(C) vs. [Fe/H] diagram. Inspection of the [alpha/C] abundance ratios reveals that five of the CEMP Group II stars can be classified as "mono-enriched second-generation" stars. Gaia DR1 matches were found for 734 stars, and we show that transverse velocities can be used as a confirmatory selection criteria for low-metallicity candidates. Selected stars from our validated list are being followed-up with high-resolution spectroscopy, to reveal their full chemical abundance patterns for further studies.
  • We report the discovery of RAVE J203843.2-002333, a bright (V = 12.73), very metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -2.91), r-process-enhanced ([Eu/Fe] = +1.64 and [Ba/Eu] = -0.81) star selected from the RAVE survey. This star was identified as a metal-poor candidate based on its medium-resolution (R ~ 1,600) spectrum obtained with the KPNO/Mayall Telescope, and followed-up with high-resolution (R ~ 66,000) spectroscopy with the Magellan/Clay Telescope, allowing for the determination of elemental abundances for 24 neutron-capture elements, including thorium and uranium. RAVE J2038-0023 is only the fourth metal-poor star with a clearly measured U abundance. The derived chemical-abundance pattern exhibits good agreement with those of other known highly r-process-enhanced stars, and evidence in hand suggests that it is not an actinide-boost star. Age estimates were calculated using Th/X and U/X abundance ratios, yielding a mean age of 13.0 +/- 1.1 Gyr.
  • N103B is a Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR) projected in the outskirt of the superbubble around the rich cluster NGC 1850 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We have obtained H$\alpha$ and continuum images of N103B with the $\textit{Hubble Space Telescope}$ ($\textit{HST}$) and high-dispersion spectra with 4m and 1.5m telescopes at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. The $\textit{HST}$ H$\alpha$ image exhibits a complex system of nebular knots inside an incomplete filamentary elliptical shell that opens to the east where X-ray and radio emission extends further out. Electron densities of the nebular knots, determined from the [S II] doublet, reach 5300 cm$^{-3}$, indicating an origin of circumstellar medium, rather than interstellar medium. The high-dispersion spectra reveal three kinematic components in N103B: (1) a narrow component with [N II]6583/H$\alpha$ $\sim$ 0.14 from the ionized interstellar gas associated with the superbubble of NGC 1850 in the background, (2) a broader H$\alpha$ component with no [N II] counterpart from the SNR's collisionless shocks into a mostly neutral ambient medium, and (3) a broad component, $\Delta V$ $\sim$ 500 km s$^{-1}$, in both H$\alpha$ and [N II] lines from shocked material in the nebular knots. The Balmer-dominated filaments can be fitted by an ellipse, and we adopt its center as the site of SN explosion. We find that the star closest to this explosion center has colors and luminosity consistent with a 1 $M_\odot$ surviving subgiant companion as modelled by Podsiadlowski. Follow-up spectroscopic observations are needed to confirm this star as the SN's surviving companion.
  • Aims. We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the evolved supernova remnants MCSNR J0506-7025 and MCSNR J0527-7104 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Methods. We used data from XMM-Newton, the Australian Telescope Compact Array, and the Magellanic Cloud Emission Line Survey to study their broadband emission and used Spitzer and HI data to gain a picture of their environments. We performed a multi-wavelength morphological study and detailed radio and X-ray spectral analyses to determine their physical characteristics. Results. Both remnants were found to have bright X-ray cores, dominated by Fe L-shell emission, consistent with reverse shock heated ejecta with determined Fe masses in agreement with Type Ia explosion yields. A soft X-ray shell, consistent with swept-up interstellar medium, was observed in MCSNR J0506-7025, suggestive of a remnant in the Sedov phase. Using the spectral fit results and the Sedov self-similar solution, we estimated the age of MCSNR J0506-7025 to be ~16-28 kyr, with an initial explosion energy of (0.07-0.84)x10^51 erg. A soft shell was absent in MCSNR J0527-7104, with only ejecta emission visible in an extremely elongated morphology extending beyond the optical shell. We suggest that the blast wave has broken out into a low density cavity, allowing the shock heated ejecta to escape. We found that the radio spectral index of MCSNR J0506-7025 is consistent with the standard ~0.5 for SNRs. Radio polarisation at 6 cm indicates a higher degree of polarisation along the western front and at the eastern knot, with a mean fractional polarisation across the remnant of P~(20 \pm 6)%. Conclusions. The detection of Fe-rich ejecta in the remnants suggests that both resulted from Type Ia explosions. The newly identified Fe-rich cores in MCSNR J0506-7025 and MCSNR J0527-7104 makes them members of the expanding class of evolved Fe-rich remnants in the Magellanic Clouds.
  • The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) hosts a rich and varied population of supernova remnants (SNRs). Optical, X-ray, and radio observations are required to identify these SNRs, as well as to ascertain the various processes responsible for the large array of physical characteristics observed. In this paper we attempted to confirm the candidate SNR [HP99] 1234, identified in X-rays with ROSAT, as a true SNR by supplementing these X-ray data with optical and radio observations. Optical data from the Magellanic Cloud Emission Line Survey (MCELS) and new radio data from the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope (MOST), in addition to the ROSAT X-ray data, were used to perform a morphological analysis of this candidate SNR. An approximately ellipsoidal shell of enhanced [SII], typical of an SNR ([SII]/Halpha > 0.4), was detected in the optical. This enhancement is coincident with faint radio emission at 36 cm. Using the available data we estimated the size of the remnant to be ~5.1' x 4.0' (~75 pc x 59 pc). However, the measurement along the major-axis was somewhat uncertain due to a lack of optical and radio emission at its extremities and the poor resolution of the X-ray data. Assuming this SNR is in the Sedov phase and adopting the ambient mass density of 1.2x10^-25 g cm^-3 measured in a nearby HII region, an age estimate of ~25 kyr was calculated for a canonical initial explosion energy of 10^51 erg. However, this age estimate should be treated cautiously due to uncertainties on the adopted parameters. Analysis of the local stellar population suggested a type Ia event as a precursor to this SNR, however, a core-collapse mechanism could not be ruled out due to the possibility of the progenitor being a runaway massive star. With the detection of X-ray, radio and optical line emission with enhanced [SII], this object was confirmed as an SNR and we assign the identifier MCSNR J0527-7104.
  • Recent high spatial and spectral resolution investigations of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) have found significant evidence for small-scale variations in the interstellar gas on scales less than or equal to 1 pc. To better understand the nature of small-scale variations in the ISM, we have used the KPNO WIYN Hydra multi-object spectrograph, which has a mapping advantage over the single-axis, single-scale limitations of studies using high proper motion stars and binary stars, to obtain moderate resolution (~12 km/s) interstellar Na I D absorption spectra of 172 stars toward the double open cluster h and Chi Persei. All of the sightlines toward the 150 stars with spectra that reveal absorption from the Perseus spiral arm show different interstellar Na I D absorption profiles in the Perseus arm gas. Additionally, we have utilized the KPNO Coude Feed spectrograph to obtain high-resolution (~3 km/s) interstellar Na I D absorption spectra of 24 of the brighter stars toward h and Chi Per. These spectra reveal an even greater complexity in the interstellar Na I D absorption in the Perseus arm gas and show individual components changing in number, velocity, and strength from sightline to sightline. If each of these individual velocity components represents an isolated cloud, then it would appear that the ISM of the Perseus arm gas consists of many small clouds. Although the absorption profiles vary even on the smallest scales probed by these high-resolution data (~30";~0.35pc), our analysis reveals that some interstellar Na I D absorption components from sightline to sightline are related, implying that the ISM toward h and Chi Per is probably comprised of sheets of gas in which we detect variations due to differences in the local physical conditions of the gas.
  • We present ROSAT observations and analysis of thirteen superbubbles in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Eleven of these observations have not been previously reported. We have studied the X-ray morphology of the superbubbles, and have extracted and analyzed their X-ray spectra. Diffuse X-ray emission is detected from each of these superbubbles, and X-ray emission is brighter than is theoretically expected for a wind-blown bubble, suggesting that the X-ray emission from the superbubbles has been enhanced by interactions between the superbubble shell and interior SNRs. We have also found significant positive correlations between the X-ray luminosity of a superbubble and its H-alpha luminosity, expansion velocity, and OB star count. Further, we have found that a large fraction of the superbubbles in the sample show evidence of ``breakout'' regions, where hot X-ray emitting gas extends beyond the H-alpha shell.
  • We have observed H-alpha and [OIII] emission from eight of the most well defined Wolf-Rayet ring nebulae in the Galaxy. We find that in many cases the outermost edge of the [OIII] emission leads the H-alpha emission. We suggest that these offsets, when present, are due to the shock from the Wolf-Rayet bubble expanding into the circumstellar envelope. Thus, the details of the WR bubble morphology at H-alpha and [OIII] can then be used to better understand the physical condition and evolutionary stage of the nebulae around Wolf-Rayet stars, as well as place constraints on the nature of the stellar progenitor and its mass loss history.
  • Bright X-ray emission has been detected in superbubbles in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and it is suggested that supernova remnants (SNRs) near the inner shell walls are responsible for this X-ray emission. To identify SNR shocks in superbubble interiors, we have obtained HST WFPC2 emission-line images of the X-ray-bright superbubbles DEM L 152 and DEM L 192 and the X-ray-dim superbubble DEM L 106. We use these images to examine the shell morphology and [S II]/H-alpha ratio variations in detail. Of these three superbubbles, DEM L 152 has the highest X-ray surface brightness, the most filamentary nebular morphology, the largest expansion velocity, and the highest [S II]/H-alpha ratio. Its [S II]/H-alpha ratio increases outwards and peaks in sharp filaments along the periphery. DEM L 192 has a moderate X-ray surface brightness, a complex but not filamentary morphology, a moderate expansion velocity, and a low [S II]/H-alpha ratio. DEM L 106 is not detected in X-rays. Its shell structure is amorphous and has embedded dusty features; its expansion velocity is low. None of the three superbubbles show morphological features in the shell interior that can be identified as directly associated with SNR shocks, indicating that the SNR shocks have not encountered very dense material. We find that the [S II]/H-alpha ratios of X-ray-bright superbubbles are strongly dependent on the UV radiation field of the encompassed OB associations. Therefore, a tight correlation between [S II]/H-alpha ratio and X-ray surface brightness in superbubbles should not exist. We also find that the filamentary morphologies of superbubbles are associated with large expansion velocities and bright X-ray emission.
  • The large H II complex N11 in the Large Magellanic Cloud contains OB associations at several different stages in their life histories. We have obtained ROSAT PSPC and HRI X-ray observations, Curtis Schmidt CCD images, echelle spectra in H-alpha and [N II] lines, and IUE interstellar absorption line observations of this region. The central bubble of N11 has an X-ray luminosity a factor of only 3-7 brighter than predicted for an energy-conserving superbubble, making this the first detection of X-ray emission from a superbubble without a strong X-ray excess. The region N11B contains an extremely young OB association analogous to the central association of the Carina nebula, apparently still embedded in its natal molecular cloud. We find that N11B emits diffuse X-ray emission, probably powered by stellar winds. Finally, we compare the tight cluster HD32228 in N11 to R136 in 30 Dor. The latter is a strong X-ray source, while the former is not detected, showing that strong X-ray emission from compact objects is not a universal property of such tight clusters.
  • We have used optical echelle spectra along with ROSAT and ASCA X-ray spectra to test the hypothesis that the southern portion of the N44 X-ray bright region is the result of a blowout structure. Three pieces of evidence now support this conclusion. First, the filamentary optical morphology corresponding with the location of the X-ray bright South Bar suggests the blowout description (Chu et al 1993). Second, optical echelle spectra show evidence of high velocity (~90 km/sec) gas in the region of the blowout. Third, X-ray spectral fits show a lower temperature for the South Bar than the main superbubble region of Shell 1. Such a blowout can affect the evolution of the superbubble and explain some of the discrepancy discussed by Oey & Massey (1995) between the observed shell diameter and the diameter predicted on the basis of the stellar content and Weaver et al.'s (1977) pressure-driven bubble model.