• We present details of the construction and characterization of the coaddition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 \ugriz\ imaging data. This survey consists of 275 deg$^2$ of repeated scanning by the SDSS camera of $2.5\arcdeg$ of $\delta$ over $-50\arcdeg \le \alpha \le 60\arcdeg$ centered on the Celestial Equator. Each piece of sky has $\sim 20$ runs contributing and thus reaches $\sim2$ magnitudes fainter than the SDSS single pass data, i.e. to $r\sim 23.5$ for galaxies. We discuss the image processing of the coaddition, the modeling of the PSF, the calibration, and the production of standard SDSS catalogs. The data have $r$-band median seeing of 1.1\arcsec, and are calibrated to $\le 1%$. Star color-color, number counts, and psf size vs modelled size plots show the modelling of the PSF is good enough for precision 5-band photometry. Structure in the psf-model vs magnitude plot show minor psf mis-modelling that leads to a region where stars are being mis-classified as galaxies, and this is verified using VVDS spectroscopy. As this is a wide area deep survey there are a variety of uses for the data, including galactic structure, photometric redshift computation, cluster finding and cross wavelength measurements, weak lensing cluster mass calibrations, and cosmic shear measurements.
  • We present a new and simple technique for selecting extensive, complete and pure quasar samples, based on their intrinsic variability. We parametrize the single-band variability by a power-law model for the light-curve structure function, with amplitude A and power-law index gamma. We show that quasars can be efficiently separated from other non-variable and variable sources by the location of the individual sources in the A-gamma plane. We use ~60 epochs of imaging data, taken over ~5 years, from the SDSS stripe 82 (S82) survey, where extensive spectroscopy provides a reference sample of quasars, to demonstrate the power of variability as a quasar classifier in multi-epoch surveys. For UV-excess selected objects, variability performs just as well as the standard SDSS color selection, identifying quasars with a completeness of 90% and a purity of 95%. In the redshift range 2.5<z<3, where color selection is known to be problematic, variability can select quasars with a completeness of 90% and a purity of 96%. This is a factor of 5-10 times more pure than existing color-selection of quasars in this redshift range. Selecting objects from a broad griz color box without u-band information, variability selection in S82 can afford completeness and purity of 92%, despite a factor of 30 more contaminants than quasars in the color-selected feeder sample. This confirms that the fraction of quasars hidden in the 'stellar locus' of color-space is small. To test variability selection in the context of Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) we created mock PS1 data by down-sampling the S82 data to just 6 epochs over 3 years. Even with this much sparser time sampling, variability is an encouragingly efficient classifier. For instance, a 92% pure and 44% complete quasar candidate sample is attainable from the above $griz$-selected catalog.
  • We present the fifth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog, which is based upon the SDSS Seventh Data Release. The catalog, which contains 105,783 spectroscopically confirmed quasars, represents the conclusion of the SDSS-I and SDSS-II quasar survey. The catalog consists of the SDSS objects that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7) have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i > 15.0 and have highly reliable redshifts. The catalog covers an area of 9380 deg^2. The quasar redshifts range from 0.065 to 5.46, with a median value of 1.49; the catalog includes 1248 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 56 are at redshifts greater than five. The catalog contains 9210 quasars with i < 18; slightly over half of the entries have i< 19. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.1" rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 Ang. at a spectral resolution R = 2000 the spectra can be retrieved from the SDSS public database using the information provided in the catalog. Over 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS. We also include a supplemental list of an additional 207 quasars with SDSS spectra whose archive photometric information is incomplete.
  • We present a comprehensive multiband spectral and polarimetric study of the jet of 3C 264 (NGC 3862). Included in this study are three HST optical and ultraviolet polarimetry data sets, along with new and archival VLA radio imaging and polarimetry, a re-analysis of numerous HST broadband data sets from the near infrared to the far ultraviolet, and a Chandra ACIS-S observation. We investigate similarities and differences between optical and radio polarimetry, in both degree of polarization and projected magnetic field direction. We also examine the broadband spectral energy distribution of both the nucleus and jet of 3C 264, from the radio through the X-rays. From this we place constraints on the physics of the 3C 264 system, the jet and its dynamics. We find significant curvature of the spectrum from the near-IR to ultraviolet, and synchrotron breaks steeper than 0.5, a situation also encountered in the jet of M87. This likely indicates velocity and/or magnetic field gradients and more efficient particle acceleration localized in the faster/higher magnetic field parts of the flow. The magnetic field structure of the 3C 264 jet is remarkably smooth; however, we do find complex magnetic field structure that is correlated with changes in the optical spectrum. We find that the X-ray emission is due to the synchrotron process; we model the jet spectrum and discuss mechanisms for accelerating particles to the needed energies, together with implications for the orientation of the jet under a possible spine-sheath model.
  • We present an improved analysis of halo substructure traced by RR Lyrae stars in the SDSS stripe 82 region. With the addition of SDSS-II data, a revised selection method based on new ugriz light curve templates results in a sample of 483 RR Lyrae stars that is essentially free of contamination. The main result from our first study persists: the spatial distribution of halo stars at galactocentric distances 5--100 kpc is highly inhomogeneous. At least 20% of halo stars within 30 kpc from the Galactic center can be statistically associated with substructure. We present strong direct evidence, based on both RR Lyrae stars and main sequence stars, that the halo stellar number density profile significantly steepens beyond a Galactocentric distance of ~30 kpc, and a larger fraction of the stars are associated with substructure. By using a novel method that simultaneously combines data for RR Lyrae and main sequence stars, and using photometric metallicity estimates for main sequence stars derived from deep co-added u-band data, we measure the metallicity of the Sagittarius dSph tidal stream (trailing arm) towards R.A.2h-3h and Dec~0 deg to be 0.3 dex higher ([Fe/H]=-1.2) than that of surrounding halo field stars. Together with a similar result for another major halo substructure, the Monoceros stream, these results support theoretical predictions that an early forming, smooth inner halo, is metal poor compared to high surface brightness material that have been accreted onto a later-forming outer halo. The mean metallicity of stars in the outer halo that are not associated with detectable clumps may still be more metal-poor than the bulk of inner-halo stars, as has been argued from other data sets.
  • We present the discovery of six new quasars at z~6 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) southern survey, a deep imaging survey obtained by repeatedly scanning a stripe along the celestial equator. The six quasars are about two magnitudes fainter than the luminous z~6 quasars found in the SDSS main survey and one magnitude fainter than the quasars reported in Paper I (Jiang et al. 2008). Four of them comprise a complete flux-limited sample at 21<z_AB<21.8 over an effective area of 195 deg^2. The other two quasars are fainter than z_AB=22 and are not part of the complete sample. The quasar luminosity function at z~6 is well described as a single power law \Phi(L_{1450}) \propto L_{1450}^{\beta} over the luminosity range -28<M_{1450}<-25. The best-fitting slope \beta varies from -2.6 to -3.1, depending on the quasar samples used, with a statistical error of 0.3-0.4. About 40% of the quasars discovered in the SDSS southern survey have very narrow Lya emission lines, which may indicate small black hole masses and high Eddington luminosity ratios, and therefore short black hole growth time scales for these faint quasars at early epochs.
  • The near future of astrophysics involves many large solid-angle, multi-epoch, multi-band imaging surveys. These surveys will, at their faint limits, have data on large numbers of sources that are too faint to be detected at any individual epoch. Here we show that it is possible to measure in multi-epoch data not only the fluxes and positions, but also the parallaxes and proper motions of sources that are too faint to be detected at any individual epoch. The method involves fitting a model of a moving point source simultaneously to all imaging, taking account of the noise and point-spread function in each image. By this method it is possible to measure the proper motion of a point source with an uncertainty close to the minimum possible uncertainty given the information in the data, which is limited by the point-spread function, the distribution of observation times (epochs), and the total signal-to-noise in the combined data. We demonstrate our technique on multi-epoch Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging of the SDSS Southern Stripe. We show that we can distinguish very red brown dwarfs by their proper motions from very high-redshift quasars more than $1.6\mag$ fainter than with traditional technique on these SDSS data, and with better better fidelity than by multi-band imaging alone. We re-discover all 10 known brown dwarfs in our sample and present 9 new candidate brown dwarfs, identified on the basis of high proper motion.
  • Low-frequency radio astronomy is limited by severe ionospheric distortions below 50 MHz and complete reflection of radio waves below 10-30 MHz. Shielding of man-made interference from long-range radio broadcasts, strong natural radio emission from the Earth's aurora, and the need for setting up a large distributed antenna array make the lunar far side a supreme location for a low-frequency radio array. A number of new scientific drivers for such an array, such as the study of the dark ages and epoch of reionization, exoplanets, and ultra-high energy cosmic rays, have emerged and need to be studied in greater detail. Here we review the scientific potential and requirements of these and other new scientific drivers and discuss the constraints for various lunar surface arrays. In particular we describe observability constraints imposed by the interstellar and interplanetary medium, calculate the achievable resolution, sensitivity, and confusion limit of a dipole array using general scaling laws, and apply them to various scientific questions. Whichever science is deemed most important, pathfinder arrays are needed to test the feasibility of these experiments in the not too distant future. Lunar low-frequency arrays are thus a timely option to consider, offering the potential for significant new insights into a wide range of today's crucial scientific topics. This would open up one of the last unexplored frequency domains in the electromagnetic spectrum.
  • The QSO luminosity function at z>5 provides strong constraints on models of joint evolution of QSO and their hosts. However, these observations are challenging because the low space densities of these objects necessitate surveying of large areas, in order to obtain statistically meaningful samples, while at the same time cosmological redshifting and dimming means that rather deep Near Infrared (NIR) imaging must be carried out. Several upcoming and proposed facilities with wide-field NIR imaging capabilities will open up this new region of parameter space. In this paper we present predictions for the expected number counts of z>5 QSOs, based on simple empirical and semi-empirical models of QSO evolution, as a function of redshift, depth and surveyed area. We compute the evolution of observed-frame QSO magnitudes and colors in a representative photometric system covering the wavelength range 550nm<lambda<1800nm, and combine this information with different estimates for the evolution of the QSO luminosity function. We conclude that planned ground-based surveys such as Pan-STARRS and VISTA should be able to detect a large number of luminous QSOs up to z<7.5, but that space-based missions such as EUCLID (formerly SPACE/DUNE) or SNAP are probably required in order to obtain substantial samples at higher redshift. We also use our models to predict the expected number counts for future X-ray space missions (such as XEUS and Constellation-X), and show that because of their small field-of-view, these telescopes are unlikely to discover significant numbers of AGN at very high redshift. However, X-ray follow-up of objects detected at longer wavelength will be an important means of confirming their identity as AGN and constraining obscuration.
  • Thanks to the availability of high-resolution high-sensitivity telescopes such as the Very Large Array, the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory, there is now a wealth of observational data on relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei (AGN) as well as galactic sources such as Black-Hole X-ray Binaries. Since the jet speeds cannot be constrained well from observations, but are generally believed to be relativistic, physical quantities inferred from observables are commonly expressed in terms of the unknown beaming parameters: the bulk Lorentz factor and the line-of-sight angle, usually in their combination as relativistic Doppler factor. This paper aims to resolve the discrepancies existing in the literature about such "de-beaming" of derived quantities, in particular regarding the minimum-energy magnetic field estimate. The discrepancies arise because the distinction is not normally made between the case of a fixed source observed with different beaming parameters and the case where the source projection on the sky is held fixed. The former is usually considered, but it is the latter that corresponds to interpreting actual jet observations. Furthermore, attention is drawn to the fact that apparent superluminal motion has a spatial corollary, here called "retardation magnification", which implies that most parts of a relativistic jet that are actually present in the observer's frame (a "world map" in relativity terminology) are in fact hidden on the observer's image (the "world picture" in general, or "supersnapshot" in the special case of astronomy).
  • We present the discovery of five quasars at z~6 selected from 260 deg^2 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) southern survey, a deep imaging survey obtained by repeatedly scanning a stripe along the Celestial Equator. The five quasars with 20<z_{AB}<21 are 1-2 magnitudes fainter than the luminous z~6 quasars discovered in the SDSS main survey. One of them was independently discovered by the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey. These quasars, combined with another z~6 quasar known in this region, make a complete flux- limited quasar sample at z_{AB}<21. The sample spans the redshift range 5.85<z<6.12 and the luminosity range -26.5<M_{1450}<-25.4 (H_0=70 km s^{-1} Mpc^{-1}, Omega_{m}=0.3, and Omega_{Lambda}=0.7). We use the 1/V_{a} method to determine that the comoving quasar spatial density at <z>=6.0 and <M_{1450}>=-25.8 is (5.0+/-2.1) x 10^{-9} Mpc^{-3} mag^{-1}. We model the bright-end quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z~6 as a power law Phi(L_{1450}) \propto L_{1450}^{beta}. The slope beta calculated from a combination of our sample and the luminous SDSS quasar sample is -3.1+/-0.4, significantly steeper than the slope of the QLF at z~4. Based on the derived QLF, we find that the quasar/AGN population cannot provide enough photons to ionize the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z~6 unless the IGM is very homogeneous and the luminosity (L*_{1450}) at which the QLF power law breaks is very low.
  • We have found empirically that the radio loudness of AGN can be understood as function of both the X-ray and optical luminosity. This way of considering the radio loudness was inspired by the hardness-intensity diagrams for X-ray binaries, in which objects follow a definite track with changes to their radio properties occurring in certain regions. We generalize the hardness-intensity diagram to a "disk-fraction luminosity diagram", which can be used to classify the accretion states both of X-ray binaries and of AGN. Using a sample of nearly 5000 SDSS quasars with ROSAT matches, we show that an AGN is more likely to have a high radio:optical flux ratio when it has a high total luminosity or a large contribution from X-rays. Thus, it is necessary to take into account both the optical and the X-ray properties of quasars in order to understand their radio loudness. The success of categorizing quasars in the same way as X-ray binaries is further evidence for the unification of accretion onto stellar-mass and supermassive compact objects.
  • We present far-ultraviolet (UV) observations at 150 nm of the jet of the quasar 3C 273 obtained with the Advanced Camera for Survey's Solar Blind Channel (ACS/SBC) on board the Hubble Space Telescope. While the jet morphology is very similar to that in the optical and near-ultraviolet, the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the jet's sub-regions show an upturn in nu f_nu at 150 nm compared to 300 nm everywhere in the jet. Moreover, the 150 nm flux is compatible with extrapolating the X-ray power-law down to the ultra-violet region. This constitutes strong support for a common origin of the jet's far-UV and X-ray emission. It implies that even a substantial fraction of the *visible light* in the X-ray brightest parts of the jet arises from the same spectral component as the X-rays, as had been suggested earlier based on Spitzer Space Telescope observations. We argue that the identification of this UV/X-ray component opens up the possibility to establish the synchrotron origin of the X-ray emission by optical polarimetry.
  • We present the fourth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog contains 77,429 objects; this is an increase of over 30,000 entries since the previous edition. The catalog consists of the objects in the SDSS Fifth Data Release that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7) have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s, or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i=15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 5740 sq. deg. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.48; the catalog includes 891 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 36 are at redshifts greater than five. Approximately half of the catalog quasars have i < 19; nearly all have i < 21. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2 arcsec. rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains basic radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800--9200A at a spectral resolution of ~2000. The spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. The average SDSS colors of quasars as a function of redshift, derived from the catalog entries, are presented in tabular form. Approximately 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS.
  • We quantify the variability of faint unresolved optical sources using a catalog based on multiple SDSS imaging observations. The catalog covers SDSS Stripe 82, and contains 58 million photometric observations in the SDSS ugriz system for 1.4 million unresolved sources. In each photometric bandpass we compute various low-order lightcurve statistics and use them to select and study variable sources. We find that 2% of unresolved optical sources brighter than g=20.5 appear variable at the 0.05 mag level (rms) simultaneously in the g and r bands. The majority (2/3) of these variable sources are low-redshift (<2) quasars, although they represent only 2% of all sources in the adopted flux-limited sample. We find that at least 90% of quasars are variable at the 0.03 mag level (rms) and confirm that variability is as good a method for finding low-redshift quasars as is the UV excess color selection (at high Galactic latitudes). We analyze the distribution of lightcurve skewness for quasars and find that is centered on zero. We find that about 1/4 of the variable stars are RR Lyrae stars, and that only 0.5% of stars from the main stellar locus are variable at the 0.05 mag level. The distribution of lightcurve skewness in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram on the main stellar locus is found to be bimodal (with one mode consistent with Algol-like behavior). Using over six hundred RR Lyrae stars, we demonstrate rich halo substructure out to distances of 100 kpc. We extrapolate these results to expected performance by the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and estimate that it will obtain well-sampled 2% accurate, multi-color lightcurves for ~2 million low-redshift quasars, and will discover at least 50 million variable stars.
  • We present an analysis of the mid-infrared (MIR) and optical properties of type 1 (broad-line) quasars detected by the Spitzer Space Telescope. The MIR color-redshift relation is characterized to z=3, with predictions to z=7. We demonstrate how combining MIR and optical colors can yield even more efficient selection of active galactic nuclei (AGN) than MIR or optical colors alone. Composite spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are constructed for 259 quasars with both Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Spitzer photometry, supplemented by near-IR, GALEX, VLA and ROSAT data where available. We discuss how the spectral diversity of quasars influences the determination of bolometric luminosities and accretion rates; assuming the mean SED can lead to errors as large as a factor of 2 for individual quasars. Finally, we show that careful consideration of the shape of the mean quasar SED and its redshift dependence leads to a lower estimate of the fraction of reddened/obscured AGNs missed by optical surveys as compared to estimates derived from a single mean MIR to optical flux ratio.
  • We present an overview of new HST imaging polarimetry of six nearby radio galaxies with optical jets. These observations triple the number of extragalactic jets with subarcsecond-resolution optical polarimetry. We discuss the polarization characteristics and optical morphology of each jet. We find evidence of high optical polarization, averaging 20%, but reaching upwards of $\sim 50%$ in some objects, confirming that the optical emission is synchrotron, and that the components of the magnetic fields perpendicular to the line of sight are well ordered. We find a wide range of polarization morphologies, with each jet having a somewhat different relationship between total intensity and polarized flux and the polarization position angle. We find two trends in all of these jets. First, jet ``edges'' are very often associated with high fractional optical polarizations, as also found in earlier radio observations of these and other radio jets. In these regions, the magnetic field vectors appear to track the jet direction, even at bends, where we see particularly high fractional polarizations. This indicates a strong link between the local magnetic field and jet dynamics. Second, optical flux maximum regions are usually well separated from maxima in fractional polarization and often are associated with polarization minima. This trend is not found in radio data and was found in our optical polarimetry of M87 with HST. However, unlike in M87, we do not find a general trend for near-90$^\circ$ rotations in the optical polarization vectors near flux maxima. We discuss possibilities for interpreting these trends, as well as implications for jet dynamics, magnetic field structure and particle acceleration.
  • We determine the number counts and z=0-5 luminosity function for a well-defined, homogeneous sample of quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We conservatively define the most uniform statistical sample possible, consisting of 15,343 quasars within an effective area of 1622 deg^2 that was derived from a parent sample of 46,420 spectroscopically confirmed broad-line quasars in the 5282 deg^2 of imaging data from SDSS Data Release Three. The sample extends from i=15 to i=19.1 at z<3 and to i=20.2 for z>3. The number counts and luminosity function agree well with the results of the 2dF QSO Survey, but the SDSS data probe to much higher redshifts than does the 2dF sample. The number density of luminous quasars peaks between redshifts 2 and 3, although uncertainties in the selection function in this range do not allow us to determine the peak redshift more precisely. Our best fit model has a flatter bright end slope at high redshift than at low redshift. For z<2.4 the data are best fit by a redshift-independent slope of beta = -3.1 (Phi(L) propto L^beta). Above z=2.4 the slope flattens with redshift to beta=-2.37 at z=5. This slope change, which is significant at a >5-sigma level, must be accounted for in models of the evolution of accretion onto supermassive black holes.
  • Using an eigenspectrum decomposition technique, we separate the host galaxy from the broad line active galactic nucleus (AGN) in a set of 4666 spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), from redshifts near zero up to about 0.75. The decomposition technique uses separate sets of galaxy and quasar eigenspectra to efficiently and reliably separate the AGN and host spectroscopic components. The technique accurately reproduces the host galaxy spectrum, its contributing fraction, and its classification. We show how the accuracy of the decomposition depends upon S/N, host galaxy fraction, and the galaxy class. Based on the eigencoefficients, the sample of SDSS broad-line AGN host galaxies spans a wide range of spectral types, but the distribution differs significantly from inactive galaxies. In particular, post-starburst activity appears to be much more common among AGN host galaxies. The luminosities of the hosts are much higher than expected for normal early-type galaxies, and their colors become increasingly bluer than early-type galaxies with increasing host luminosity. Most of the AGNs with detected hosts are emitting at between 1% and 10% of their estimated Eddington luminosities, but the sensitivity of the technique usually does not extend to the Eddington limit. There are mild correlations among the AGN and host galaxy eigencoefficients, possibly indicating a link between recent star formation and the onset of AGN activity. The catalog of spectral reconstruction parameters is available as an electronic table.
  • We investigate the extent to which the Palomar-Green (PG) Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) is complete and representative of the general quasar population by comparing with imaging and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A comparison of SDSS and PG photometry of both stars and quasars reveals the need to apply a color and magnitude recalibration to the PG data. Using the SDSS photometric catalog, we define the PG's parent sample of objects that are not main-sequence stars and simulate the selection of objects from this parent sample using the PG photometric criteria and errors. This simulation shows that the effective U-B cut in the PG survey is U-B < -0.71 (rather than the intended U-B < -0.44), implying a color-related incompleteness. As the color distribution of bright quasars peaks near U-B=-0.7 and the 2-sigma error in U-B is comparable to the full width of the color distribution of quasars, the color incompleteness of the BQS is approximately 50% and essentially random with respect to U-B color for z<0.5. There is, however, a bias against bright quasars at 0.5 < z < 1, which is induced by the color-redshift relation of quasars (although quasars at z>0.5 are inherently rare in bright surveys in any case). We find no evidence for any other systematic incompleteness when comparing the distributions in color, redshift, and FIRST radio properties of the BQS and a BQS-like subsample of the SDSS quasar sample. However, the application of a bright magnitude limit biases the BQS toward the inclusion of objects which are blue in g-i, in particular compared to the full range of g-i colors found among the i-band limited SDSS quasars, and even at i-band magnitudes comparable to those of the BQS objects.
  • By analogy to the different accretion states observed in black-hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs), it appears plausible that accretion disks in active galactic nuclei (AGN) undergo a state transition between a radiatively efficient and inefficient accretion flow. If the radiative efficiency changes at some critical accretion rate, there will be a change in the distribution of black hole masses and bolometric luminosities at the corresponding transition luminosity. To test this prediction, I consider the joint distribution of AGN black hole masses and bolometric luminosities for a sample taken from the literature. The small number of objects with low Eddington-scaled accretion rates mdot < 0.01 and black hole masses Mbh < 10^9 Msun constitutes tentative evidence for the existence of such a transition in AGN. Selection effects, in particular those associated with flux-limited samples, systematically exclude objects in particular regions of the black hole mass-luminosity plane. Therefore, they require particular attention in the analysis of distributions of black hole mass, bolometric luminosity, and derived quantities like the accretion rate. I suggest further observational tests of the BHXB-AGN unification scheme which are based on the jet domination of the energy output of BHXBs in the hard state, and on the possible equivalence of BHXB in the very high (or "steep power-law") state showing ejections and efficiently accreting quasars and radio galaxies with powerful radio jets.
  • We explore the form of extragalactic reddening toward quasars using a sample of 9566 quasars with redshifts 0<z<2.2, and accurate optical colors from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We confirm that dust reddening is the primary explanation for the red ``tail'' of the color distribution of SDSS quasars. Our fitting to 5-band photometry normalized by the modal quasar color as a function of redshift shows that this ``tail'' is well described by SMC-like reddening but not by LMC-like, Galactic, or Gaskell et al. (2004) reddening. Extension to longer wavelengths using a subset of 1886 SDSS-2MASS matches confirms these results at high significance. We carry out Monte-Carlo simulations that match the observed distribution of quasar spectral energy distributions using a Lorentzian dust reddening distribution; 2% of quasars selected by the main SDSS targeting algorithm (i.e., which are not extincted out of the sample) have E_{B-V} > 0.1; less than 1% have E_{B-V} > 0.2, where the extinction is relative to quasars with modal colors. Reddening is uncorrelated with the presence of intervening narrow-line absorption systems, but reddened quasars are much more likely to show narrow absorption at the redshift of the quasar than are unreddened quasars. Thus the reddening towards quasars is dominated by SMC-like dust at the quasar redshift.
  • We present the second edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of 16713 objects in the SDSS First Data Release (DR1) that have luminosities larger than M_i=-22 (H_0=70 km/s, Omega_M=0.3, Omega_Lambda=0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered is ~1360 deg^2 and the redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.43. Each object has positions accurate to better than 0.2" rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method, in addition to radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large area surveys. Calibrated digital spectra covering 3800-9200 Angstroms at a spectral resolution 1800-2100, are available. This publication supersedes the first SDSS Quasar Catalog, which was based on material from the SDSS Early Data Release. A summary of corrections to current quasar databases is provided. The majority of the objects were found in SDSS commissioning data using a multicolor selection technique. Since the quasar selection algorithm was undergoing testing during the entire DR1 observational period, care must be taken when assembling samples for use in statistical studies. A total of 15786 objects (94%) in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS; 12,173 of which are reported here for the first time, including five quasars brighter than i=16.0 and 17 quasars with redshifts larger than 4.5.