• Quantum entanglement is widely recognized as one of the key resources for the advantages of quantum information processing, including universal quantum computation, reduction of communication complexity or secret key distribution. However, computational models have been discovered, which consume very little or no entanglement and still can efficiently solve certain problems thought to be classically intractable. The existence of these models suggests that separable or weakly entangled states could be extremely useful tools for quantum information processing as they are much easier to prepare and control even in dissipative environments. It has been proposed that a requirement for useful quantum states is the generation of so-called quantum discord, a measure of non-classical correlations that includes entanglement as a subset. Although a link between quantum discord and few quantum information tasks has been studied, its role in computation speed-up is still open and its operational interpretation remains restricted to only few somewhat contrived situations. Here we show that quantum discord is the optimal resource for the remote quantum state preparation, a variant of the quantum teleportation protocol. Using photonic quantum systems, we explicitly show that the geometric measure of quantum discord is related to the fidelity of this task, which provides an operational meaning. Moreover, we demonstrate that separable states with non-zero quantum discord can outperform entangled states. Therefore, the role of quantum discord might provide fundamental insights for resource-efficient quantum information processing.
  • We present a high-fidelity quantum teleportation experiment over a high-loss free-space channel between two laboratories. We teleported six states of three mutually unbiased bases and obtained an average state fidelity of 0.82(1), well beyond the classical limit of 2/3. With the obtained data, we tomographically reconstructed the process matrices of quantum teleportation. The free-space channel attenuation of 31 dB corresponds to the estimated attenuation regime for a down-link from a low-earth-orbit satellite to a ground station. We also discussed various important technical issues for future experiments, including the dark counts of single-photon detectors, coincidence-window width etc. Our experiment tested the limit of performing quantum teleportation with state-of-the-art resources. It is an important step towards future satellite-based quantum teleportation and paves the way for establishing a worldwide quantum communication network.
  • Quantum teleportation [1] is a quintessential prerequisite of many quantum information processing protocols [2-4]. By using quantum teleportation, one can circumvent the no-cloning theorem [5] and faithfully transfer unknown quantum states to a party whose location is even unknown over arbitrary distances. Ever since the first experimental demonstrations of quantum teleportation of independent qubits [6] and of squeezed states [7], researchers have progressively extended the communication distance in teleportation, usually without active feed-forward of the classical Bell-state measurement result which is an essential ingredient in future applications such as communication between quantum computers. Here we report the first long-distance quantum teleportation experiment with active feed-forward in real time. The experiment employed two optical links, quantum and classical, over 143 km free space between the two Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife. To achieve this, the experiment had to employ novel techniques such as a frequency-uncorrelated polarization-entangled photon pair source, ultra-low-noise single-photon detectors, and entanglement-assisted clock synchronization. The average teleported state fidelity was well beyond the classical limit of 2/3. Furthermore, we confirmed the quality of the quantum teleportation procedure (without feed-forward) by complete quantum process tomography. Our experiment confirms the maturity and applicability of the involved technologies in real-world scenarios, and is a milestone towards future satellite-based quantum teleportation.