• We propose a simple setup of Rydberg atoms in a honeycomb lattice which gives rise to topologically protected edge states. The proposal is based on the combination of dipolar exchange interaction, which couples the internal angular momentum and the orbital degree of freedom of a Rydberg excitation, and a static magnetic field breaking time reversal symmetry. We demonstrate that for realistic experimental parameters, signatures of topologically protected edge states are present in small systems with as few as 10 atoms. Our analysis paves the way for the experimental realization of Rydberg systems characterized by a topological invariant, providing a promising setup for future application in quantum information.
  • We study a system of atoms that are laser-driven to $nD_{3/2}$ Rydberg states and assess how accurately they can be mapped onto spin-$1/2$ particles for the quantum simulation of anisotropic Ising magnets. Using non-perturbative calculations of the pair interaction potentials between two atoms in the presence of both electric and magnetic fields, we emphasize the importance of a careful selection of the experimental parameters in order to maintain the Rydberg blockade and avoid excitation of unwanted Rydberg states. We then benchmark these theoretical observations against experiments using two atoms. Finally, we show that in these conditions, the experimental dynamics observed after a quench is in good agreement with numerical simulations of spin-1/2 Ising models in systems with up to 49 spins, for which direct numerical simulations become intractable.
  • The strong interaction between individual Rydberg atoms provides a powerful tool exploited in an ever-growing range of applications in quantum information science, quantum simulation, and ultracold chemistry. One hallmark of the Rydberg interaction is that both its strength and angular dependence can be fine-tuned with great flexibility by choosing appropriate Rydberg states and applying external electric and magnetic fields. More and more experiments are probing this interaction at short atomic distances or with such high precision that perturbative calculations as well as restrictions to the leading dipole-dipole interaction term are no longer sufficient. In this tutorial, we review all relevant aspects of the full calculation of Rydberg interaction potentials. We discuss the derivation of the interaction Hamiltonian from the electrostatic multipole expansion, numerical and analytical methods for calculating the required electric multipole moments, and the inclusion of electromagnetic fields with arbitrary direction. We focus specifically on symmetry arguments and selection rules, which greatly reduce the size of the Hamiltonian matrix, enabling the direct diagonalization of the Hamiltonian up to higher multipole orders on a desktop computer. Finally, we present example calculations showing the relevance of the full interaction calculation to current experiments. Our software for calculating Rydberg potentials including all features discussed in this tutorial is available as open source.
  • We experimentally study the effects of the anisotropic Rydberg-interaction on $D$-state Rydberg polaritons slowly propagating through a cold atomic sample. In addition to the few-photon nonlinearity known from similar experiments with Rydberg $S$-states, we observe the interaction-induced dephasing of Rydberg polaritons at very low photon input rates into the medium. We develop a model combining the propagation of the two-photon wavefunction through our system with nonperturbative calculations of the anisotropic Rydberg-interaction to show that the observed effect can be attributed to pairwise interaction of individual Rydberg polaritons.
  • We often wish to use external data to improve the precision of an inference, but concerns arise when the different datasets have been collected under different conditions so that we do not want to simply pool the information. This is the well-known problem of meta-analysis, for which Bayesian methods have long been used to achieve partial pooling. Here we consider the challenge when the external data are averages rather than raw data. We provide a Bayesian solution by using simulation to approximate the likelihood of the external summary, and by allowing the parameters in the model to vary under the different conditions. Inferences are constructed using importance sampling from an approximate distribution determined by an expectation propagation-like algorithm. We demonstrate with the problem that motivated this research, a hierarchical nonlinear model in pharmacometrics, implementing the computation in Stan.
  • Random networks are widely used to model complex networks and research their properties. In order to get a good approximation of complex networks encountered in various disciplines of science, the ability to tune various statistical properties of random networks is very important. In this manuscript we present an algorithm which is able to construct arbitrarily degree-degree correlated networks with adjustable degree-dependent clustering. We verify the algorithm by using empirical networks as input and describe additionally a simple way to fix a degree-dependent clustering function if degree-degree correlations are given.
  • Random networks are intensively used as null models to investigate properties of complex networks. We describe an efficient and accurate algorithm to generate arbitrarily two-point correlated undirected random networks without self- or multiple-edges among vertices. With the goal to systematically investigate the influence of two-point correlations, we furthermore develop a formalism to construct a joint degree distribution $P(j,k)$ which allows to fix an arbitrary degree distribution $P(k)$ and an arbitrary average nearest neighbor function $\knn(k)$ simultaneously. Using the presented algorithm, this formalism is demonstrated with scale-free networks ($P(k) \propto k^{-\gamma}$) and empirical complex networks ($P(k)$ taken from network) as examples. Finally, we generalize our algorithm to annealed networks which allows networks to be represented in a mean-field like manner.
  • We study the reaction-diffusion process $A + B \to \emptyset$ on uncorrelated scale-free networks analytically. By a mean-field ansatz we derive analytical expressions for the particle pair-correlations and the particle density. Expressing the time evolution of the particle density in terms of the instantaneous particle pair-correlations, we determine analytically the `jamming' effect which arises in the case of multicomponent, pair-wise reactions. Comparing the relevant terms within the differential equation for the particle density, we find that the `jamming' effect diminishes in the long-time, low-density limit. This even holds true for the hubs of the network, despite that the hubs dynamically attract the particles.