• Van der Waals structures formed by aligning monolayer graphene with insulating layers of hexagonal boron nitride exhibit a moir\'e superlattice that is expected to break sublattice symmetry. Despite an energy gap of several tens of millielectron volts opening in the Dirac spectrum, electrical resistivity remains lower than expected at low temperature and varies between devices. While subgap states are likely to play a role in this behavior, their precise nature is unclear. We present a scanning gate microscopy study of moir\'e superlattice devices with comparable activation energy but with different charge disorder levels. In the device with higher charge impurity (~${10}^{10}$ $cm^{-2}$) and lower resistivity (~$10$ $k{\Omega}$) at the Dirac point we observe current flow along the graphene edges. Combined with simulations, our measurements suggest that enhanced edge doping is responsible for this effect. In addition, a device with low charge impurity (~$10^9$ $cm^{-2}$) and higher resistivity (~$100$ $k{\Omega}$) shows subgap states in the bulk, consistent with the absence of shunting by edge currents.
  • We observed broken-symmetry quantum Hall effects and level crossings between spin- and valley- resolved Landau levels (LLs) in Bernal stacked trilayer graphene. When the magnetic field was tilted with respect to sample normal from $0^{\circ}$ to $66^\circ$, the LL crossings formed at intersections of zeroth and second LLs from monolayer-graphene-like and bilayer-graphene-like subbands, respectively, exhibited a sequence of transitions. The results indicate the LLs from different subbands are coupled by in-plane magnetic fields ($B_{\parallel}$), which was explained by developing the tight-binding model Hamiltonian of trilayer graphene under $B_{\parallel}$.
  • We have realized a Dirac fermion reflector in graphene by controlling the ballistic carrier trajectory in a sawtooth-shaped npn junction. When the carrier density in the inner p-region is much larger than that in the outer n-regions, the first straight np interface works as a collimator and the collimated ballistic carriers can be totally reflected at the second zigzag pn interface. We observed clear resistance enhancement around the np+n regime, which is in good agreement with the numerical simulation. The tunable reflectance of ballistic carriers could be an elementary and important step for realizing ultrahigh-mobility graphene field effect transistors utilizing Dirac fermion optics in the near future.
  • We use scanning gate microscopy to map out the trajectories of ballistic carriers in high-mobility graphene encapsulated by hexagonal boron nitride and subject to a weak magnetic field. We employ a magnetic focusing geometry to image carriers that emerge ballistically from an injector, follow a cyclotron path due to the Lorentz force from an applied magnetic field, and land on an adjacent collector probe. The local electric field generated by the scanning tip in the vicinity of the carriers deflects their trajectories, modifying the proportion of carriers focused into the collector. By measuring the voltage at the collector while scanning the tip, we are able to obtain images with arcs that are consistent with the expected cyclotron motion. We also demonstrate that the tip can be used to redirect misaligned carriers back to the collector.
  • We demonstrate a vertical field-effect transistor based on a graphene/MoSe2 van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure. The vdW interface between the graphene and MoSe2 exhibits a Schottky barrier with an ideality factor of around 1.3, suggesting a high-quality interface. Owing to the low density of states in graphene, the position of the Fermi level in the graphene can be strongly modulated by an external electric field. Therefore, the Schottky barrier height at the graphene/MoSe2 vdW interface is also modulated. We demonstrate a large current ON-OFF ratio of 10^5. These results point to the potential high performance of the graphene/MoSe2 vdW heterostructure for electronics applications.
  • We performed detailed studies of the current-voltage characteristics in graphene/MoS2/metal vertical field-effect transistors. Owing to its low density of states, the Fermi level in graphene is very sensitive to its carrier density and thus the external electric field. Under the application of a bias voltage VB between graphene and the metal layer in the graphene/MoS2/metal heterostructure for driving current through the van der Waals interface, the electric field across the MoS2 dielectric induces a shift in the Fermi level of graphene. When the Fermi level of graphene coincides with the Dirac point, a significant nonlinearity appears in the measured I-V curve, thus enabling us to perform spectroscopy of the Dirac point. By detecting the Dirac point for different back-gate voltages, we revealed that the capacitance of the nanometer-thick MoS2 layer can be determined from a simple DC transport measurement.
  • We demonstrate a quantum Hall edge-channel interferometer in a high-quality graphene pn junction under a high magnetic field. The co-propagating p and n quantum Hall edge channels traveling along the pn interface functions as a built-in Aharanov-Bohm-type interferometer, the interferences in which are sensitive to both the external magnetic field and the carrier concentration. The trajectories of peak and dip in the observed resistance oscillation are well reproduced by our numerical calculation that assumes magnetic flux quantization in the area enclosed by the co-propagating edge channels. Coherent nature of the co-propagating edge channels are confirmed by the checkerboard-like pattern in the dc-bias and magnetic-field dependences of the resistance oscillations.
  • Detail transport properties of graphene/MoS2/metal vertical heterostructure have been investigated. The van der Waals interface between the graphene and MoS2 exhibits Schottky barrier. The application of gate voltage to the graphene layer enables us to modulate the Schottky barrier height; thus gives rise to the control of the current flow across the interface. By analyzing the temperature dependence of the conductance, the modulation of Schottky barrier height {\Delta}{\phi} has been directly determined. We observed significant MoS2 layer number dependence of {\Delta}{\phi}. Moreover, we demonstrate that the device which shows larger {\Delta}{\phi} exhibits larger current modulation; this is consistent with the fact that the transport of these devices is dominated by graphene/MoS2 Schottky barrier.
  • This paper demonstrates the high-quality tunnel barrier characteristics and layer number controlled tunnel resistance of a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) measuring just a few monolayers in thickness. Investigation of vertical transport in WS2 and MoS2 TMDs in graphene/TMD/metal heterostructures revealed that WS2 exhibits tunnel barrier characteristics when its thickness is between 2 to 5 monolayers, whereas MoS2 experiences a transition from tunneling to thermionic emission transport with increasing thickness within the same range. Tunnel resistance in a graphene/WS2/metal heterostructure therefore increases exponentially with the number of WS2 layers, revealing the tunnel barrier height of WS2 to be 0.37 eV.
  • Graphene-based vertical field effect transistors have attracted considerable attention in the light of realizing high-speed switching devices; however, the functionality of such devices has been limited by either their small ON-OFF current ratios or ON current densities. We fabricate a graphene/MoS2/metal vertical heterostructure by using mechanical exfoliation and dry transfer of graphene and MoS2 layers. The van der Waals interface between graphene and MoS2 exhibits a Schottky barrier, thus enabling the possibility of well-defined current rectification. The height of the Schottky barrier can be strongly modulated by an external gate electric field owing to the small density of states of graphene. We obtain large current modulation exceeding 10^5 simultaneously with a large current density of ~10^4 A/cm^2 , thereby demonstrating the superior performance of the exfoliated-graphene/MoS2/metal vertical field effect transistor
  • We demonstrate electrical spin injection from a ferromagnet to a bilayer graphene (BLG) through a monolayer (ML) of single-crystal hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). A Ni81Fe19/ML h-BN/BLG/h-BN structure is fabricated using a micromechanical cleavage and dry transfer technique. The transport properties across the ML h-BN layer exhibit tunnel barrier characteristics. Spin injection into BLG has been detected through non local magnetoresistance measurements.